question about a Durst enlarger...

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Beppe Alborè, Dec 16, 2004.

  1. hi ! (excuse me for this question, but i'm a beginner)

    i have a Durst F60 enlarger.
    Naturally, there is the filter drawer, where i know i can put the contrast
    filters for multigrade papers, but there's also a red filter, which is
    integrated in the enlarger head, that can be used or not.
    when i use it, turning a little red knob, the projected image becomes red.

    i can't understand what's its task : maybe it is useful to project the image
    onto the paper without exposing it ?

    thanks for your answers, and excuse me for my english.......
     
    Beppe Alborè, Dec 16, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Beppe Alborè

    Nick Zentena Guest


    The red filter is supposedly so you can put the paper on the easel. Frame
    and compose the print. I never use it on the one enlarger that has it and
    I've never missed it on enlargers that don't. I figure sooner or later that
    red filter would get me in trouble.

    Nick
     
    Nick Zentena, Dec 16, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. : hi ! (excuse me for this question, but i'm a beginner)

    : i have a Durst F60 enlarger.
    : Naturally, there is the filter drawer, where i know i can put the contrast
    : filters for multigrade papers, but there's also a red filter, which is
    : integrated in the enlarger head, that can be used or not.
    : when i use it, turning a little red knob, the projected image becomes red.

    : i can't understand what's its task : maybe it is useful to project the image
    : onto the paper without exposing it ?

    That's exactly what the red filter is for. On many enlargers, this filter
    is on a small arm that swings in and out underneath the lens. I know it's
    build into the enlarger head on a Durst M600, and perhaps on some other
    Durst models. This allows you to check the positioning of the easel
    before exposure.

    Warren B. Hapke


    : thanks for your answers, and excuse me for my english.......
     
    Warren B. Hapke, Dec 16, 2004
    #3
  4. Beppe Alborè

    jjs Guest

    Exactly.
     
    jjs, Dec 16, 2004
    #4
  5. i ask this because my enlarger doesn't have the switch to turn the light on
    or off.
    i just insert the plug, and it turns on, i remove the plug and it turns
    off....
    can i use this red knob as a substitute of the switch, or may i have
    problems ?
    thanks for answers !!!
    p.s. i don't own the timer !!!
     
    Beppe Alborè, Dec 16, 2004
    #5
  6. The Troll morphs once again.
     
    Gregory Blank, Dec 16, 2004
    #6
  7. : i ask this because my enlarger doesn't have the switch to turn the
    light on
    : or off.
    : i just insert the plug, and it turns on, i remove the plug and it turns
    : off....
    : can i use this red knob as a substitute of the switch, or may i have
    : problems ?
    : thanks for answers !!!
    : p.s. i don't own the timer !!!

    It's unusual for the power cord not to have a switch in it that will
    let you turn the enlarger on and off. Using the red knob as a substitute
    for the switch is likely to cause minute vibrations in the enlarger head,
    which will degrade sharpness in the final print.

    In the US, hardware stores sell switches that can be spliced into
    standard two-wire power cords. I would assume that you could find
    something similar in Italy. If you have any mechanical ability at all,
    it's a very easy fix.

    Warren B. Hapke







    : : > : hi ! (excuse me for this question, but i'm a beginner)
    : >
    : > : i have a Durst F60 enlarger.
    : > : Naturally, there is the filter drawer, where i know i can put the
    : contrast
    : > : filters for multigrade papers, but there's also a red filter, which is
    : > : integrated in the enlarger head, that can be used or not.
    : > : when i use it, turning a little red knob, the projected image becomes
    : red.
    : >
    : > : i can't understand what's its task : maybe it is useful to project the
    : image
    : > : onto the paper without exposing it ?
    : >
    : > That's exactly what the red filter is for. On many enlargers, this filter
    : > is on a small arm that swings in and out underneath the lens. I know it's
    : > build into the enlarger head on a Durst M600, and perhaps on some other
    : > Durst models. This allows you to check the positioning of the easel
    : > before exposure.
    : >
    : > Warren B. Hapke
    : >
    : >
    : > : thanks for your answers, and excuse me for my english.......
    : >
    : >
    : >
     
    Warren B. Hapke, Dec 16, 2004
    #7
  8. Ciao Beppe,

    It is theorically feasible but I strongly advise you insert a switch in the power cord or, better,
    buy a timer, a very simple one is enough.
    You can find them very cheap on eBay, including pretty sophisticated timers (with analyzers which
    may be somewhat to early for you as you're a beginner) at very low prices (50 Euros and less) on
    eBay Germany.
    Or ask the italian photo newsgroup (it.arti.fotografia), chances are someone close to you sells one.

    Un salutone,
     
    Claudio Bonavolta, Dec 17, 2004
    #8
  9. Beppe Alborè

    Mike King Guest

    A timer is a most useful addition to any darkroom. If you get a Gralab 300
    or equivalent you can use the same time for the enlarger and for timing
    processing of you film developments. Very useful if you want consistent
    repeatable results in the darkroom. If you didn't care about quality it's
    unlikely you'd be posting here so I'd invest in a timer (or multiple timers,
    I forget how many I own!).
     
    Mike King, Dec 19, 2004
    #9
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.