Question for Olympus Users

Discussion in 'Olympus' started by MoParMaN, Feb 24, 2009.

  1. MoParMaN

    MoParMaN Guest

    I use and have always used the Olympus E-series digital SLR's. My current
    main camera is the E-3 and I have 8 lens's for it, but most were actually
    made for the E-1 and E-300. I usually just shoot wildlife and nature
    shots, but in June my middle son is getting married and has asked me to do
    the photography. You hear some really bad stuff about wedding
    photographers and I really don't want to do it, as I don't shoot people,
    specially at weddings.

    I've got a coupla questions. Anyone using the new 12-60mmSWB lens? Would
    that be a good lens to shoot indoors at a wedding? Since it's a zoom and
    can also do wide angles and is fast (the fastest autofocus around) I was
    thinking of buying it for the occasion.

    Thanks for ideas.
     
    MoParMaN, Feb 24, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. MoParMaN

    Get lost Guest

    It should work fine, it's reasonably fast (f2.8-4), very sharp and
    focusing is quick. The 50mm f2.0 might get you more flattering
    portraits. I think you should consider, if you/he can afford it, to
    hire a pro. Why dilute the market doing a job a pro should do that
    (frankly) is not going to be up to a professional standard? It's like
    when some company owner says his neighbour's kid is designing the
    company website.
     
    Get lost, Feb 24, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. MoParMaN

    MoParMaN Guest

    It should work fine, it's reasonably fast (f2.8-4), very sharp and
    focusing is quick. The 50mm f2.0 might get you more flattering
    portraits. I think you should consider, if you/he can afford it, to
    hire a pro. Why dilute the market doing a job a pro should do that
    (frankly) is not going to be up to a professional standard? It's like
    when some company owner says his neighbour's kid is designing the
    company website.


    Exactly why I don't want to do it, he doesn't have the money to hire a pro
    and he knows I take a lot of pictures....I'm prolly stuck with the job for
    now. I already has the 50mm F2.0 lens. It's fine for up close and I've
    got the 50-200mm F2.8 for long shots. I was thinking the new 12-60mm
    would be nice for in between.
     
    MoParMaN, Feb 25, 2009
    #3
  4. MoParMaN

    Steven Wandy Guest

    Firstly - assuming money is not the issue I agree with the other
    poster to hire some else to shoot the wedding. My daughter got married
    a few years ago and while I did take along small camera I really would
    not have enjoyed myself if I was doing the shooting. Also, if the
    shots don't come out good, your son's and daughter-in-law's memories
    will be ruined (and they probably won't forgive you anytime soon. It
    is one thing if you were a pro WEDDING photographer, but from what I
    read you are not. It is not as easy/simple as it looks. (And yes I
    have done it a few times.)

    Second - the 12-60 is a great addition, especially since you have the
    E3, which can take advantage of the SWD motor in the lens. As was
    stated it is very sharp and focuses very fast - even in pretty dim
    light.
    I also agree with the other poster about bringing a second body. Just
    imagine if something goes wrong with your primary camera.
     
    Steven Wandy, Feb 25, 2009
    #4
  5. MoParMaN

    Alan Hoyle Guest

    You might also consider the Sigma 30mm f1.4 or Leica 25mm f1.4 for
    indoor/low light shots without flash. An Sigma 30mm and an Olympus
    14-54mm f2.8-3.5 approches the same price as the 12-60mm.

    Do you have a second body? It would be quite disappointing to miss
    some shots because you were changing lenses...

    Also, if you're going to be using flash, do you have an FL-50 or
    FL-50R with an external battery pack? The internal flash or FL-36
    won't recharge very quickly, and you have to get all the way up to the
    50/R before you can connect an external pack.

    On the other hand, this is your son's wedding. Would you rather be
    participating and celebrating it yourself or trying to document the
    moment? I have a couple of semi-pro friends who do wedding
    photography (not as their primary source of income) who charge rates
    competitive to what the $600-800 that the 12-60 would cost.

    -a
     
    Alan Hoyle, Feb 26, 2009
    #5
  6. MoParMaN

    Bruce Guest


    Well said. That's probably the best advice so far in this thread.

    Amateurs who plan to shoot weddings always ask the same question: what
    equipment should I buy? The problem is, wedding photography is not
    primarily about equipment.

    Wedding photography is about managing people, and getting the shots you
    need while disrupting the flow of the event (and the joy of the day) as
    little as possible.

    Some people have the necessary people skills and just need a little
    training in the shots that are needed and what are the easiest and least
    disruptive routines for getting them. Other people just don't have the
    necessary people skills. They should just butt out, employ a
    professional who knows what he/she is doing, and enjoy the day.

    The worst possible way to approach wedding photography is to ask what
    equipment needs to be bought. The answer is probably "none".

    More equipment isn't the answer; learning about managing people relative
    to the nature of the venue and the ambient conditions is. But that's
    far more difficult than charging a new lens to your VISA card.
     
    Bruce, Feb 26, 2009
    #6
  7. MoParMaN

    Robert Coe Guest

    I use and have always used the Olympus E-series digital SLR's. My current
    : main camera is the E-3 and I have 8 lens's for it, but most were actually
    : made for the E-1 and E-300. I usually just shoot wildlife and nature
    : shots, but in June my middle son is getting married and has asked me to do
    : the photography. You hear some really bad stuff about wedding
    : photographers and I really don't want to do it, as I don't shoot people,
    : specially at weddings.
    :
    : I've got a coupla questions. Anyone using the new 12-60mmSWB lens? Would
    : that be a good lens to shoot indoors at a wedding? Since it's a zoom and
    : can also do wide angles and is fast (the fastest autofocus around) I was
    : thinking of buying it for the occasion.
    :
    : Thanks for ideas.

    Find at least one similar event (an anniversary party, for example) to
    practice on and see what you're up against. If you don't do it very well,
    re-think the idea, because a wedding is one of the tougher challenges an event
    photographer will face.

    How will you handle the fact that, as the father of the groom, you'll have to
    be *in* some of the pictures?

    Even if you do get stuck with this job, you may never photograph a wedding
    again. So you may not want to buy an expensive new lens unless you're sure
    you'd use it for your wildlife photography. Especially if, as someone else
    suggested, you can find a paid photographer for about the same cost as the
    lens.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 28, 2009
    #7
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.