Question on Saturation

Discussion in 'Digital Point & Shoot Camera' started by The PhAnToM, Mar 11, 2005.

  1. The PhAnToM

    The PhAnToM Guest

    Hi- I was wondering if there was a trick to getting rid of bright color
    saturation (especially white) in digital photos without compromising
    the color levels in the rest of the shot (i.e., making the whole photo
    too dark)? Or is this just an artifact of taking photos with a CCD that
    has to be lived with? Thanks.

    Zach
     
    The PhAnToM, Mar 11, 2005
    #1
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  2. Photoshop Elements 3 has a feature that lets you reduce highlights and /
    or make dark spots lighter.

    HTH

    robert
     
    Robert Klemme, Mar 11, 2005
    #2
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  3. The PhAnToM

    The PhAnToM Guest

    Mmm. You mean the burn tool? Or is it some other tool? I have PS 7.0
    (made work buy it for me, and of course my backup copy is on my home
    laptop :^). The parts that are fully saturated contain no variation in
    data, unfortunately, so burn doesn't work _that_ well on monochromatic
    saturated areas, for instance. It _does_ work well if there are
    different levels and colors that came out too bright in the original
    image. What I am talking about is like on the swan's back in the link
    to the bird photos that Deko posted in the max-zoom thread. I think
    this has to be compensated for at the front end (taking the picture).
    When the white is super saturated it has like a blue tint too it (hmm,
    like maybe the blue cells are dominating the pixel, or is it the
    reverse?).

    Thanks for the suggestion just the same. Maybe I shouldn't assume too
    much. (goes to download the swan picture to see what can be done with
    it)

    Zach
     
    The PhAnToM, Mar 12, 2005
    #3
  4. The PhAnToM

    Dekko Guest


    Let me know if that egret turns into a swan...=)

    The snowy egret is just truly that intense of white and the feathers are so
    ....well feathery.. that it looks flat white with little detail. I had no
    polarizing filter when I took those either but I doubt it would have made
    much difference..

    Those as posted have had an unsharp mask used on the egret and may have been
    contrast adjusted for sharpness too because of the added digital zoom they
    were not quite sharp as taken. Then for the web page compressed and resized
    so are not high quality jpegs to play with anyway.
    I can email you an original jpeg file to play with if you like.
     
    Dekko, Mar 12, 2005
    #4
  5. The PhAnToM

    The PhAnToM Guest

    Thanks for the suggestion just the same. Maybe I shouldn't assume
    too
    Oops. I guess I should have looked at it again today, instead of just
    glancing at it from last night...
    Sure. I will attempt my feeble Photoshop skills on it...

    Zach
     
    The PhAnToM, Mar 12, 2005
    #5
  6. The PhAnToM

    Dekko Guest


    Did you get my emails OK?
     
    Dekko, Mar 13, 2005
    #6
  7. Hi- I was wondering if there was a trick to getting rid of bright color
    Some cameras have internal settings that artificially augment the
    colors, to make the photographs look more "striking." Most of these
    cameras have settings to adjust the degree to which the image is
    enhanced, so if your camera allows it, you might try using a lower
    enhancement setting.

    -Joel
     
    Dr. Joel M. Hoffman, Mar 21, 2005
    #7
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