Questionnaire about stereoscopic movie

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by Bagna83, Mar 11, 2009.

  1. Bagna83

    Bagna83 Guest

    Hello everybody, sorry to bother you, but i would like you to fill a
    simple questionnaire (5-6 minutes at most) about stereoscopic movie.
    I apologize in advance for all the possible spelling mistake we've
    done.

    http://www.digit-one.net/2020/index_eng.php

    Thank you all :)

    Francesco
     
    Bagna83, Mar 11, 2009
    #1
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  2. I can't be bothered with the survey, but The Register and other news
    sites reported Sky (UK broadcaster) will be trialling stereoscopic
    movies shortly here :

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/dec/18/bskyb-3d-television
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/12/18/sky_3d_demo/
    http://www.reghardware.co.uk/2009/03/09/sky_3d_tv_confirm/


    Cheers - Neil
     
    Neil Smith [MVP Digital Media], Mar 11, 2009
    #2
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  3. Bagna83

    David McCall Guest

    I haven't really been satisfied with any of the approaches to 3D
    I've seen holograms that looked pretty 3d, even when you move
    around them, but I don't think they ever got color or motion working.

    I find the tradition 2 camera approach annoying to view and to work with.
    Most of the solutions require something mounted to your head. Shuttered
    glasses are heavy, red/blue just looks dumb. There is a relatively new
    (within a couple decades) that used a sort-of normal image and a blue
    image and it hurt my eye to watch. Polarized lenses are about the most
    practical today but tilting your head messes up the effect. If you try to
    look at something other than the subject then the subject becomes a
    double image.

    It is difficult to shoot because everything has to be within the frame,
    Imagine a rectangular cone that starts at the lens and goes out to the
    plane of the main subject. That is the point where the 2 images will
    line up. Everything behind that plane will display properly, but anything
    that is between the camera and that plane has to stay within that cone.
    If an object breaks through the sides iv the cone it will be cut off
    unnaturally and be confusing to the eye. This is really limiting to
    the cinematographer. It pretty much rules out foreground objects.

    We need a whole new technology before 3d will ever be worth much.
     
    David McCall, Mar 11, 2009
    #3
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