Rebel XT blurry shots

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Sken, May 10, 2006.

  1. Sken

    Sken Guest

    I borrowed a Digital Rebel 6MP for a couple of weeks and easily took
    shots I thought were amazing, the depth and clarity were very
    impressive, enough so that I ordered a Digital Rebel XT 8MP for myself
    along with a new stabilized 70mm to 300mm Canon lense. I've never been
    able to match the photos I took with the old borrowed Rebel with the new
    one. I've compared lenses, sent everything back to Canon for repair
    or replacement, (Great customer service by the way) and still the shots
    look flat and without depth and usually just a tiny bit out of focus.
    The long lense takes better shots than the kit lense that came with the
    camera (18 to 55(. I've even asked the person I borrowed the original
    Rebel if he wants to trade, so far, no go.... Has anyone had these
    problems? I've compared the camera settings to the old one, and even
    rebooted the camera and reset everything to factory, but alas, still the
    same.. Very frustrating....

    SK
     
    Sken, May 10, 2006
    #1
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  2. What lens did you borrow with the Rebel?
     
    Måns Rullgård, May 10, 2006
    #2
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  3. Sken

    Beach Bum Guest


    Have you tried sharpening the images in photoshop? dSLR's don't destroy
    images by oversharpening them like point and shoots.

    Are you comparing images on a monitor or actual prints? If prints - try a
    different lab, if monitor, try a different monitor.
     
    Beach Bum, May 10, 2006
    #3
  4. Sken

    Scott W Guest

    Try doing everything you can to get a sharp image, mount the camera on
    a tripod, use the mirror lockup and timer, set the f number for
    something like f/8 to f/11 and shoot raw. Don't shoot anything very
    far again as air current mess up a photo pretty fast.

    Not all of the above may be needed but it might tell you what the
    camera can do, then start changing one thing at a time and see where
    the images goes soft again.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, May 10, 2006
    #4
  5. Sken

    ... Guest

    Canon say:
    "If the camera point of focus is anywhere within the depth of field of the
    lens, the auto focus is deemed to be working correctly".

    This is fine when you buy a "kit" with a F/3.5 lens and use it at F/5.6 or
    smaller but when you start to use some high quality (giggle) Canon lenses
    with apertures in the F/1.4 - F/1.8 range, the focus point which was
    acceptable to Canon, becomes much more critical. The 70-300 Canon lens is a
    sharp enough lens. It shouldn't produce soft pictures.

    Obviously you don't have a F/1.4 lens to make some tests so you need to seek
    out someone in your area who can test your camera with one of these lenses
    and take a chart to Canon showing the focus point is somewhere other than in
    the right place. Then they will re-calibrate the camera. They do not do
    focus re-calibration if their plastic lens fits the firsts paragraph.
     
    ..., May 10, 2006
    #5
  6. Sken

    Beach Bum Guest

    That's good advice to find out what is the camera and what is the person
    shooting. Almost all the blurry photos I take are that way because I shook
    or was trying to hand hold at too low a shutter speed. The Rebel XT is
    /very/ light and I bet I'd have a lot of trouble hand holding it.
     
    Beach Bum, May 11, 2006
    #6
  7. Today Sken attempted to dazzle everyone with this profound
    linguistic utterance
    My rather new Rebel XT takes less sharp images that I would
    expect with L-glass Canon lenses, but it is /not/ the fault of
    the camera or glass. It is the fault of the dummy behind the
    camera - me. Despite some 6,000 images (most test shots), I
    have yet to fully exploit the inherrent quality of this
    outstanding camera.

    How about expanding somewhat as to what you mean by "blurry".
    Do you mean not enough DOF with that long lens or maybe camera
    shake from hand-holding at too low a shutter speed or just
    all-around softness? Also, what subject(s) do you shoot under
    what lighting conditions? Tripod or hand-held? Finally, did
    the borrowed older 6 MP Rebel have a long lens or maybe just
    the kit lens?

    I am hardly making sport of you, just trying to understand. I
    will also follow the rest of this thread to pick up what I can
    to improve my own pictures. My 99 44/100% subjects are always
    cars, 50% in daylight and 50% in museums with flash, so I do
    not have a need for a very long zoom nor IS (or at least I
    don't think I need/want IS).

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry

    "'Illigitimus Non Carborundum', loosely translated from the
    Latin to mean 'Don't let the bastards grind you down!" - Motto
    of Oakland University School of Engineering, 1969
     
    All Things Mopar, May 11, 2006
    #7
  8. Today Beach Bum attempted to dazzle everyone with this
    profound linguistic utterance
    I use both Unsharp Mask and Clarify in PSP 9 (can't afford PS
    CS2) in order to crisp up my soft Rebel pics, but again, it
    isn't the fault of the camera or lenses, it is me.
    I assume the OP is comparing images apples-to-apples vs. the
    older Rebel so it doesn't matter how they do the comparo if it
    is that obvious. In my reply, I only guessed that the problem
    might be lack of DOF combined with camera shake from the very
    long lens.

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry

    "'Illigitimus Non Carborundum', loosely translated from the
    Latin to mean 'Don't let the bastards grind you down!" - Motto
    of Oakland University School of Engineering, 1969
     
    All Things Mopar, May 11, 2006
    #8
  9. Today Beach Bum attempted to dazzle everyone with this
    profound linguistic utterance
    Yes, the Rebel XT is small and light. It was those two
    attributes that attracted me to it. However, the mass and C.G.
    of the camera are hardly the only things that affect camera
    shake. Inquiring minds need to know more about the OP's
    situations to be able to diagnose this without shooting arrows
    into the air and wondering where they come down.

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry

    "'Illigitimus Non Carborundum', loosely translated from the
    Latin to mean 'Don't let the bastards grind you down!" - Motto
    of Oakland University School of Engineering, 1969
     
    All Things Mopar, May 11, 2006
    #9
  10. Sken

    Rod Williams Guest

    If you have it on auto focus with all points selected, I have found that
    many times it picks something that is not your main subject to focus on.
    With my camera lens combination I have found that the top center point
    gives me the best focus. (28-105 USMII 3.4-4.5) I also found this lens
    does best at f5.6 and above. At 3.5 and 4.5 it doesn't look sharp.
     
    Rod Williams, May 11, 2006
    #10
  11. Sken

    tomm42 Guest


    Jerry,
    The only way to check the camera is to totally stabilize it, a tripod
    is fine and a remote release. Focus on an isolated object and see if
    the focus is off. It is not unheard of to get a bad lens and / or
    camera. It also could be that the lens is just too big for you, this
    happens too. Then you have a choice to work off a tripod or take back
    the 70-300 and get a 80-200 f4 L, a very nice light lens. But first
    test the camera and lens, you owe that to yourself.
    Weight has a lot to do with shake, the lighter the camera the more
    shake is transmitted through to the user. That is why pros like cameras
    with some heft. I don't imagine with the smaller mirror it is as much a
    problem with APS Dslrs.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, May 11, 2006
    #11
  12. Sken

    Celcius Guest

    Rod,
    When I bought my XT, I also complained about the focus. I got exactly the
    same advice: choose only one central focus point. If need be, one should
    focus that point on the chosen subject and if necessarey, re-compose the
    image. Since then I've had no problem.
    MArcel
     
    Celcius, May 11, 2006
    #12
  13. Today Celcius attempted to dazzle everyone with this profound
    linguistic utterance
    Me three, Celcius. But, we have yet to hear from the OP as to
    the exact type of unsharpness ...

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry

    "'Illigitimus Non Carborundum', loosely translated from the
    Latin to mean 'Don't let the bastards grind you down!" - Motto
    of Oakland University School of Engineering, 1969
     
    All Things Mopar, May 11, 2006
    #13
  14. Today tomm42 attempted to dazzle everyone with this profound
    linguistic utterance
    I understand that, Tom. However, it should be trivial to
    determine the really egregious culprits here, doncha think?
    Which reminds me, has the OP ever said what the nature of the
    problem really is?

    As to the 70-300, which the OP bought at great expense, I very
    much agree with you. Often, newbies of one sort or another - of
    which I are one wrt to DSLRs - buy things before learning what
    they really want to do, and certainly before they figure out how
    to get past full-auto shooting.

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry

    "'Illigitimus Non Carborundum', loosely translated from the
    Latin to mean 'Don't let the bastards grind you down!" - Motto
    of Oakland University School of Engineering, 1969
     
    All Things Mopar, May 11, 2006
    #14
  15. Sken

    Beach Bum Guest

    OP didn't specify and so far hasn't reposted - so it does indeed seem a good
    idea to me to give him as many possibilities to work from as possible.
    Shoot arrows and hope one lands in his head so to speak. :)
     
    Beach Bum, May 11, 2006
    #15
  16. Sken

    Beach Bum Guest

    Photos do not seem as sharp as ones he took with a different camera.
     
    Beach Bum, May 11, 2006
    #16
  17. Sken

    RichA Guest

    Since the fellow had the Rebel and now has the XT (same weight,
    roughly)
    and got decent photos with the Rebel and not so good with the XT, I'd
    say technique
    is ruled out as a cause of the problem.
     
    RichA, May 11, 2006
    #17
  18. Today Beach Bum attempted to dazzle everyone with this
    profound linguistic utterance
    I got that part, but how exactly? I am still in the dark, so to
    speak, as to whether the images were of the same/similar subject
    (s) and/or same/similar lense(s) and/or same/similar levels of
    operator expertise and/or ...

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry

    "'Illigitimus Non Carborundum', loosely translated from the
    Latin to mean 'Don't let the bastards grind you down!" - Motto
    of Oakland University School of Engineering, 1969
     
    All Things Mopar, May 11, 2006
    #18
  19. Today Beach Bum attempted to dazzle everyone with this
    profound linguistic utterance
    I have no issues with that, BB, but unless/until the OP
    responds, the arrows are only going into our heads, huh? I have
    exhausted all the easy ideas I have to help diagnose the problem
    (s) and can do no more until the Visa-deprived OP condescends to
    grace us with his/her presence again to clarify this archery
    contest.

    Meanwhile, you have a good day, hear?!

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry

    "'Illigitimus Non Carborundum', loosely translated from the
    Latin to mean 'Don't let the bastards grind you down!" - Motto
    of Oakland University School of Engineering, 1969
     
    All Things Mopar, May 11, 2006
    #19
  20. Today RichA attempted to dazzle everyone with this profound
    linguistic utterance
    Not so fast, Rich. What if the OP was using a kit lens or a
    short, compact zoom on the older Rebel and ran out and bought a
    big cannon and proceeded to shoot animals from a mile away at
    dusk when the shutter speed drops to 1/15th? Plenty of
    possibilities still left open in my (small?) mind, I'm afraid.

    --
    ATM, aka Jerry

    "'Illigitimus Non Carborundum', loosely translated from the
    Latin to mean 'Don't let the bastards grind you down!" - Motto
    of Oakland University School of Engineering, 1969
     
    All Things Mopar, May 11, 2006
    #20
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