Recommend a Point & Shoot 35mm w/Flash and Manual modes??

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Dr. Slick, Jul 11, 2004.

  1. Dr. Slick

    Dr. Slick Guest

    Hi,

    If you read my other post, you will know that I bought my APS
    just to get a quick and dirty fully-auto
    camera with built-in flash. But I was thinking lately that i would
    prefer a fully-auto 35mm (with auto-focus), that also had full manual
    modes, so that on my next vacation I could chose between full-auto,
    no-need-to-think mode (barroom pics, etc.), and an aperture
    priority mode (artistic pics of the Sphinx with a small tripod,
    for example).

    And I would get the benefit of a larger negative too,
    and cheaper processing.

    So if anyone can recommend an fully-auto 35mm, with a good
    built in flash, that has full manual modes as well, please let me
    know. Hopefully is has a good overall lens with it, although
    i do have a telescopic lens (fits my T70) that I could lug around if
    I could be convinced it was worth it.



    Slick
     
    Dr. Slick, Jul 11, 2004
    #1
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  2. Dr. Slick

    bmoag Guest

    You want an SLR. There are new low end units from Minolta and Canon that
    will do better than any P&S.
     
    bmoag, Jul 11, 2004
    #2
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  3. Dr. Slick

    Dr. Slick Guest


    ok, I don't know my cameras then.

    Can't a point and shoot also be an SLR? Or by definition, they
    are very different? I mean, can't a SLR also be auto-focus and
    have a built in flash too?


    S.
     
    Dr. Slick, Jul 11, 2004
    #3
  4. Dr. Slick

    Skip M Guest

    Point and shoots are viewfinder cameras, not SLRs. SLRs can indeed be AF
    with built in flash, like the Canon Rebel Ti, K2 and Nikon N65, which is why
    bmoag thought you would be better off with one of them. All of the 35mm
    SLRs have a manual mode, few of the p&s cameras do, and those that do are
    relatively expensive.
     
    Skip M, Jul 11, 2004
    #4
  5. And even fewer have a zoom lens. None have telephoto beyond about 80mm.

    A modern SLR *can* be a point and shoot- with AF and Program modes on.
     
    Martin Francis, Jul 11, 2004
    #5
  6. Dr. Slick

    Sabineellen Guest

    Hmmm... strangely it would be far easier to find you a P&S digital that has
    fully auto and fully manual (sic) modes than it would be to find you a 35mm
    one.

    I agree with the others; if you insist on manual and automation plus flash in
    35mm then it's an SLR. If you want these features in a P&S then consider the
    digital ones - 5 to 6 megapixels is enough for most ordinary uses and you'll
    find plenty that meet your requirements. I would even dare to say that you'll
    probably get practically better results with 6 megapixels than your APS camera.
     
    Sabineellen, Jul 11, 2004
    #6
  7. Dr. Slick

    Paul W. Ross Guest

    If you are willing to give up auto-focus, then something like a Pentax
    ZX-M works real nice. I just got back from a 3 week trip through
    Germany on a river boat. 2 bodies, 35-85, 28, and 50mm lenses. With
    the manual focus, the weight is much less, cheaper, and battery life
    excellent. For out-of-doors stuff, since you usually have a fair
    amount of light, just set for the hyperfocal distance and blaze away.
    I used one body for color (asa 800 print film), the other for B&W
    (Tmax 100). A couple of 49mm filters, and that was it.

    With the ZX-M, I can run auto/point&shoot or easily over ride
    automation for either shutter priority, arp. priority, or full manual.

    I also had along an Olympus C-5000 digital with built in flash for the
    limited indoor stuff where I needed it.

    Simple is good... Trip before, I just took one body, 35-85 zoom and
    ASA 800 color print film. This time, I had a little more space (summer
    vs. winter, so no heavy clothing), so took 3 cameras.
     
    Paul W. Ross, Jul 11, 2004
    #7
  8. Dr. Slick

    Dr. Slick Guest


    ok, gotcha.

    I think i will stick to Canon, as i have had great cameras from them.

    It seems like the Canon Rebel Ti is slightly better than the K2?


    Slick
     
    Dr. Slick, Jul 11, 2004
    #8
  9. Dr. Slick

    Dr. Slick Guest


    Well, i already have a Canon Powershot3, which is 4 megapixel, and it's
    great for taking non-flash pics (flash really ruins the ambience, doesn't it?)
    because you can check to make sure you held still enough.

    However, i was a bit disappointed, when after a small bit of cropping,
    that my 8.5x11" digital prints were just on the limits of the resolution.

    So i don't really think 6 megapixels will be enough, especially since
    i have seen 35mm blown up tremendously (4'x6' or so!), while still looking
    very cool, even though you can see the grain of the film close up!

    I understand now how people can prefer the grain of analogue film
    over that of the pixelation of digital: The grain of real film
    is somewhat more "natural" looking, for lack of a better term.

    I think i will stick to Canon, as i also have a T70 that works well,
    although getting a flash for the hotshoe of the T70 seems like it would
    be a bit bulky on a trip.

    It seems like the Canon Rebel Ti is slightly better than the K2?

    But neither of them have any sort of zoom, unless i bring another
    lens, right? I wonder if the telephoto lens i have for my T70
    will fit these?



    S.
     
    Dr. Slick, Jul 12, 2004
    #9
  10. Dr. Slick

    Skip M Guest

    The Ti is a little higher in the line than the K2, but I'm not sure of the
    differences. The lenses from your T70 won't fit without an adapter, which,
    I'm sure, are not in production any longer. You can check places like
    KEH.com and bandhphotovideo.com for them, though.
     
    Skip M, Jul 12, 2004
    #10
  11. Dr. Slick

    Dr. Slick Guest

    Ok, i've been seeing some 35mm point and shooters, view camera type.

    But these fully auto SLR 35mm cameras, I don't think any of them
    come with mechanical zooms like that, right? And with a proper
    zoom lens, does the auto focusing still work>? Or do you have to
    manually focus when using a telephoto lens?

    No big deal, i just wanna know.


    S.
     
    Dr. Slick, Jul 13, 2004
    #11
  12. Dr. Slick

    Skip M Guest

    What do you mean by "mechanical zoom?" No one makes a powered zoom for a
    35mm anymore. (I believe Pentax did for a while, but I may be mistaken.)
    All of the zooms I have are AF, I can manually focus, but I don't have to.
     
    Skip M, Jul 13, 2004
    #12
  13. Dr. Slick

    Alan Browne Guest

    Some of Minoltas xi series were powered zoom and powered
    manual/auto focus. I had the wretched 28-80xi 4-5.6. It could
    take brillant images in optimum conditions, but generally was not
    that great a lens. I put it up for sale and it sold within a
    week... go figure.
     
    Alan Browne, Jul 13, 2004
    #13
  14. Dr. Slick

    Skip M Guest

    That's who it was, Minolta. I couldn't remember. I never even knew anyone
    who had one, but I heard they were pretty dire, as far as operation.
     
    Skip M, Jul 13, 2004
    #14
  15. Ah, but Pentax had some, too. See Bojidar Dimitrov's Pentax K-Mount
    Equipment Page at http://kmp.bdimitrov.de/ for the gory K-mount
    details.
     
    Stephen H. Westin, Jul 13, 2004
    #15
  16. Dr. Slick

    Skip M Guest


    Well, then, my memory didn't fail me completely. I'm rapidly approaching
    the age in which that is a minor victory, in and of itself...
    ;-)
    OTOH, I find it a little disturbing that two such well respected mfrs. went
    down the same technological garden path at the same time...
     
    Skip M, Jul 14, 2004
    #16
  17. Dr. Slick

    Dr. Slick Guest


    I mean like on my APS point and shoot, the zoom is a powered zoom, that
    you adjust with a two-button lever, incrementing closer and farther.

    It's kind of a cool thing, as opposed to the telephoto lens on my
    T70, which you can get closer-up with, but it's adjusted with your hand,
    pushing the focusing tube forwards or back.

    Anyhow, the zoom on my APS camera is very compact, and i've seen
    35mm point and shoot cameras with something similar. I wonder if
    that would be sufficient zoom range for some artistic shots of the
    Giza pyramids and such. Unfortunately, the ones i saw did not
    seem to have any sort of manual modes.


    Slick
     
    Dr. Slick, Jul 14, 2004
    #17
  18. Dr. Slick

    Skip M Guest

    to.


    I mean like on my APS point and shoot, the zoom is a powered zoom, that
    you adjust with a two-button lever, incrementing closer and farther.

    It's kind of a cool thing, as opposed to the telephoto lens on my
    T70, which you can get closer-up with, but it's adjusted with your hand,
    pushing the focusing tube forwards or back.

    Anyhow, the zoom on my APS camera is very compact, and i've seen
    35mm point and shoot cameras with something similar. I wonder if
    that would be sufficient zoom range for some artistic shots of the
    Giza pyramids and such. Unfortunately, the ones i saw did not
    seem to have any sort of manual modes.


    Slick[/QUOTE]

    The speed with which those powered zooms adjust is too slow for most users.
    I know the one on my Canon SureShot 150 is, anyway. As noted in other
    responses on this thread, no one still makes a powered zoom for 35mm SLRs.
     
    Skip M, Jul 14, 2004
    #18
  19. Dr. Slick

    Dr. Slick Guest


    Ok, so here:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/con...&A=getItemDetail&Q=&sku=261869&is=USA&si=feat

    We have a 29-90mm manual zoom (if you can call 90mm much of a
    zoom, it
    might be good enough for me) that comes with the Rebel Ti.

    However, it can still be in auto-focus mode, as well as manual
    focus,
    right? That would be fine.

    This Canon Rebel Ti seems like what i might be looking for.

    The 29mm wide angle should be good for landscapes of Egypt,
    don't you think? And the 90mm side would also be good for
    moving in on particular landmarks and heiroglyphics and such,
    eh? Do you think 90mm will be enough?

    thanks for your help.


    Slick
     
    Dr. Slick, Jul 14, 2004
    #19
  20. Dr. Slick

    Skip M Guest

    SLRs.


    Ok, so here:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/con...&A=getItemDetail&Q=&sku=261869&is=USA&si=feat

    We have a 29-90mm manual zoom (if you can call 90mm much of a
    zoom, it
    might be good enough for me) that comes with the Rebel Ti.

    However, it can still be in auto-focus mode, as well as manual
    focus,
    right? That would be fine.

    This Canon Rebel Ti seems like what i might be looking for.

    The 29mm wide angle should be good for landscapes of Egypt,
    don't you think? And the 90mm side would also be good for
    moving in on particular landmarks and heiroglyphics and such,
    eh? Do you think 90mm will be enough?

    thanks for your help.


    Slick[/QUOTE]

    A zoom is a zoom, (unless it's varifocal, but that's another discussion...)
    whether it goes from 17-35, 28-90 or 28-300. It just ain't much of a
    telephoto zoom, at a max of 90mm.
    That lens does not have what is known as "full time manual" focusing. You
    have to flip a switch from AF to MF to achieve that. Canon lenses called
    "USM" have FTM (let's see how many acronyms I can cram into a single post!)
    What you should look for is the 28-105 f3.5-4.5 USM. Great bargain at
    around $200, the 28-90, from all accounts is a little disappointing,
    optically.
    A second lens, say a 75- or 100-300 may be necessary to really pull in
    distant objects, 90mm or 105mm is really rather short, known to some as a
    portrait length lens.
     
    Skip M, Jul 15, 2004
    #20
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