Recommendations for medium format camera

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Gary Stewart, Jul 15, 2005.

  1. Gary Stewart

    Gary Stewart Guest

    Hello group,

    First post, so go easy on me. I am looking to buy a new(used) medium format
    camera off of e-bay. The quandary is this, I am a 35mm man and have no idea
    what to get. Firstly, I will be shooting calendar shoots and commercial
    projects. Secondly, I will shoot 90% or so in the studio and the rest on
    location. And finally, all the gear I have is for 35mm, can it be used for
    medium formats?
    Now, assume that I can get any brand at a good price, what would you get and
    why?

    Thanks in advance
    --
    Gary Stewart
    Got The Look Photography & Model Consulting
    Allentown, Pa. 18109
    610-432-5871
    www.gotthelookpmc.com
     
    Gary Stewart, Jul 15, 2005
    #1
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  2. Gary Stewart

    RSD99 Guest

    See
    rec.photo.equipment.medium-format
    rec.photo.marketplace.medium-format
     
    RSD99, Jul 16, 2005
    #2
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  3. Gary Stewart

    Diverse Art Guest

    This is always a personal choice and any advice you get will be tainted by
    personal prejudice, whatever the arguments put forward.

    Personally, I'm a big fan of the Mamiya RZ-67. Maybe not quite as robust as
    a Hasselblad, but I love the 6x7 format. I shoot digital for most of my
    paying work, these days, but use the RZ whenever I shoot something for
    myself. I've used 'Blads a lot and the whole range is of exceptional
    quality, which means you may be slightly safer buying used kit. The 'Blad
    is also rather smaller than the RZ, which may be a factor if portability is
    important, though you say you'll mostly be in the studio. If you have the
    money, my ideal combo would be an RZ for the studio and a Mamiya 7 for
    location (they don't share lenses, alas, so it's a pricey combo).

    You don't say precisely what 'gear' you have, but you may need a beefier
    tripod.
     
    Diverse Art, Jul 16, 2005
    #3
  4. Gary Stewart

    b.ingraham Guest

    Mamiya RZ-67 or, cheaper and still wonderful, Mamiya RB-67. Heavy
    beast, so you'll need a really hefty tripod. Best thing about these
    cameras is the rotating back, and second best is the quick-change film
    holders to allow easy switching from color to B&W.

    Given the speed of technological advances in digital photography, I
    wouldn't buy a new camera. Who knows how long it will be before digital
    medium format is affordable by ordinary mortals? Sooner rather than
    later, I suspect.

    Bob
     
    b.ingraham, Jul 16, 2005
    #4
  5. Gary Stewart

    dj_nme Guest

    Something like a Kiev 60 TTL or Pentacon Six (both share a lensmount) or
    perhaps a Pentax 67 (_not_ k-mount compatible!) would make you feel
    pretty much at home.
    They all handle like slightly heavy 35mm SLR cameras, but (of course)
    take 120 roll film.
    Everything except your camera bodies and lenses should be compatible
    with whatever mf camera gear you get.
    All of your auto-exposure flashguns will probably have to be used in
    manual mode.
    You might need to get a 3/8" tripod socket adapter to use your current
    tripods or monopods.
    Value for money wise, I think that the Ukranian-made Kiev 60 TTL is
    pretty good.
    If you are left handed, I would recommend the Kiev 6C, because it has
    the shutter release on the left hand side (It is otherwise idental to
    the Kiev 60, with the wind lever on the right).
     
    dj_nme, Jul 16, 2005
    #5
  6. Gary Stewart

    Matti Vuori Guest

    wrote in @g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
    It already is, for those who are professional photographers and have any
    kind of revenue. From this point of view, going directly to digital
    medium format might be the best choice, and a Hasselblad H1D or the new
    digital Mamiya (it may not be in stores yet) might be worthy of serious
    consideration.

    A Mamiya 67 on the other hand might not be a good choice from the
    viewpoint of going to digital in the near future.
     
    Matti Vuori, Jul 16, 2005
    #6
  7. Gary Stewart

    dj_nme Guest

    A better idea in my way of thinking is don't bother going to digital mf.
    Buy a Canon EOS 1Ds II (or Kodak SLR/C or SLR/N) body and a few lenses
    for the price of just the price of a digital back for a medium format
    camera.
    The sensor is about the same size and the camera is smaller, lighter
    more portable than most of the digital mf solutions.
    I am not any-ones spokesperson, I just don't see the point of throwing
    vast sums of money at a problem that can be solved with slightly less
    outlay.
    A added bonus is that a vast line-up of 35mm SLR lenses can be used.
     
    dj_nme, Jul 17, 2005
    #7
  8. Gary Stewart

    Gary Stewart Guest

    Why do you like the 6x7 as opposed to the 6x6?
    --
    Gary Stewart
    Got The Look Photography & Model Consulting
    Allentown, Pa. 18109
    610-432-5871
    www.gotthelookpmc.com
     
    Gary Stewart, Jul 17, 2005
    #8
  9. Gary Stewart

    Gary Stewart Guest

    Isn't the H1D going to run like $15,000 or more? One Hell of a wad o'cash to
    drop on a single piece of gear.
    --
    Gary Stewart
    Got The Look Photography & Model Consulting
    Allentown, Pa. 18109
    610-432-5871
    www.gotthelookpmc.com
     
    Gary Stewart, Jul 17, 2005
    #9
  10. Gary Stewart

    RSD99 Guest

    "dj_nme" posted:
    "...
    Buy a Canon EOS 1Ds II (or Kodak SLR/C or SLR/N) body
    <snip>
    The sensor is about the same size
    ...."

    Not true ... not by a long shot.
     
    RSD99, Jul 17, 2005
    #10
  11. Gary Stewart

    Diverse Art Guest

    Just suits the shots I take. I generally find the square format to be a
    little deadening. The 6x7 format gives you the option of using a landscape
    or portrait format - which often adds a dynamic aspect to the image -
    without it being pronounced. Of course, you also have the option of
    cropping to a square format for those pictures where that might work (and
    Mamiya does a 6x6 back if you want to save film). The image size of the 6x7
    allows a lot of flexibility on those lines without sacrificing quality.

    The rotating back is wonderful. You can switch from landscape to portrait in
    a blink, without all that messing around you have to do with 35mm, as the
    body stays where it is.

    Frankly, I love working with the Mamiya: I've been shooting for over 30
    years now (since I was a teenager). Picked up a degree in photography along
    the way, where I shot everything from 35mm half-frame to 10x8in, worked
    briefly with an advertising photographer who shot 14x11in and have worked
    as a pro, to a greater or lesser extent (a chunk of my living is made as a
    journalist), since graduating. The Mamiya RZ is the camera that I've most
    enjoyed using. It's big and bulky enough that it demands a slow and often
    contemplative method of working. I don't use the metering prism - I shoot
    with the waist-level finder and a handheld meter and I really enjoy the
    very deliberate process it demands, which makes you think about the
    picture. That said, I've occasionally shot hand-held, mostly studio
    portraits using flash, but the odd landscape where I didn't have time to
    set up a tripod. It's not as hard as you might think, in spite of the
    camera's bulk.

    There are digital backs available, all of which require that you sacrifice
    your first-born in order to afford them. Not being psychic, I don't know if
    the prices of such backs will fall. To be honest, where I want digital
    (mainly magazine editorial work), then the 6MP I'm currently getting from
    my D-SLR are good enough. I don't do advertising work where the client
    wants supersite posters, so I don't think I'd ever invest in MF digital. I
    shoot medium format because I like the quality of the image I get from
    film. However, I did invest in a Nikon Coolscan LS-9000 which can scan
    images up to 6x9 at 4000dpi. So all my best MF images are digitised. Takes
    extra time and effort, but that gives you the best of both worlds (and
    given the image size, you could get away with a less-expensive scanner: in
    fact, I tend to scan MF images at around 2000dpi, because that still
    produces an 80-100Mb file).
     
    Diverse Art, Jul 17, 2005
    #11
  12. Gary Stewart

    UC Guest

    Hasselblad. If you even think of anything else, you'll get leprosy....
     
    UC, Jul 17, 2005
    #12
  13. Gary Stewart

    Gary Stewart Guest

    Diverse Art wrote:

    Diverse,

    I will be shooting commercial stuff (local businesses from florists to small
    manufacturers for brochures, business cards, catalogs, etc.) as well as
    inhouse produced calendars (hot womwn, fast cars and sweet bikes).
    I believe these would be satisfactory projects for the Mamiya RZ series? Or
    is there one inparticular to really go for or to really avoid?

    --
    Gary Stewart
    Got The Look Photography & Model Consulting
    Allentown, Pa. 18109
    610-432-5871
    www.gotthelookpmc.com
     
    Gary Stewart, Jul 17, 2005
    #13
  14. Gary Stewart

    UC Guest

    Hasselblad.

     
    UC, Jul 17, 2005
    #14
  15. Through my professional career, I used both. I liked the large 6x7
    negative. But the RB is strictly a studio camera and the big Pentax I
    didn't care for with weddings or in the studio.
    So when it came to an all-around, use-it-for-everything camera...I kept
    coming back to Hasselblad.
     
    Randall Ainsworth, Jul 17, 2005
    #15
  16. Gary Stewart

    Diverse Art Guest

    The RZ would be my first choice for that lot. There is only one current
    model, to my knowledge - the RZ-67 Pro II. I wouldn't go for earlier models
    - there were some issues but can't remember what they were!
     
    Diverse Art, Jul 17, 2005
    #16
  17. Gary Stewart

    Wiseguy Guest

    And if you even think of trying to buy additional lenses you'll end up in the
    poor house.

    I'm a 501 owner and I certainly cannot afford lenses other than the 80mm that is
    on it. Hell, I cannot even find anyone here in western pennsyltucky who will
    sell or process 120 roll films.

    If I had it to do over I would have bought an RZ67 Mamiya used and chanced that
    the leaf shutters in the lenses were still good (a problem with used lenses of
    that type)



    --
    There are no interpersonal problems that cannot be solved with a
    suitable application of the laws of chemistry.

    -anything after the next line is ANNOYING CRAP that newsfeeds adds-
    -directly contact newsfeeds and ISPs that piggy back them to complain-
     
    Wiseguy, Jul 18, 2005
    #17
  18. Gary Stewart

    Diverse Art Guest

    Good point about the leaf shutters. This is less of a problem with the later
    RZ lenses, compared to the RB lenses, because they're electronically timed.
    But I would always buy lenses from a reputable dealer offering warranties
    if buying secondhand.

    Of course, one advantage of Mamiya over Hasselblad is the extra
    affordability of *new* lenses. A quick check at Robert White shows a Mamiya
    RZ 150mm f/3.5 costs £604 new. A Hasselblad CFi 150mm f/4 costs £1407.
     
    Diverse Art, Jul 18, 2005
    #18
  19. Gary Stewart

    UC Guest

    Bullshit. They last forever.....
    Get a better job, moron!
    Support your local pro lab....
     
    UC, Jul 18, 2005
    #19
  20. Gary Stewart

    Wiseguy Guest

    --
    There are no interpersonal problems that cannot be solved with a
    suitable application of the laws of chemistry.

    -anything after the next line is ANNOYING CRAP that newsfeeds adds-
    -directly contact newsfeeds and ISPs that piggy back them to complain-
     
    Wiseguy, Jul 18, 2005
    #20
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