Report: Film still available

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by David Nebenzahl, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. This report is likely to only be of interest to those still shooting
    film (i.e., what this newsgroup is *supposed* to be about).

    Being out of slow-speed color print film, went to Target[1] yesterday
    with hopes that they'd still have film. In the (digital) photo dep't, I
    was about to give up and was thinking of the futility of asking someone
    there if they had something so antiquated, when I found a corner of a
    shelf with film cameras (disposables) and film. So they still have it,
    at least for the moment. Got two packs of Fuji 200 speed film, the stuff
    I've been shooting for years. 4 rolls for $6.50.

    Disclaimer: Yeah, I know it's not professional film. B&H, et al, have
    the "real" stuff (as well as some local camera stores). But it's nice to
    know that you can still pick up film inexpensively at a local retailer.


    [1] For those not in the U.S., Target (sometimes pronounced "tar-Zhay"
    for mock Frenchification) is a large retailer similar to K-Mart, with
    brand-name stuff.


    --
    Personally, I like Vista, but I probably won't use it. I like it
    because it generates considerable business for me in consulting and
    upgrades. As long as there is hardware and software out there that
    doesn't work, I stay in business. Incidentally, my company motto is
    "If this stuff worked, you wouldn't need me".

    - lifted from sci.electronics.repair
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 17, 2009
    #1
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  2. David Nebenzahl

    Pete D Guest


    Truly amazing David, finally an on topic post. Thanks but we all new this
    anyway.

    Actually loaded up some ISO 400 B&W last night for one of my kids for a
    project they are doing.

    Cheers.

    Pete
     
    Pete D, Feb 17, 2009
    #2
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  3. David Nebenzahl

    Noons Guest

    David Nebenzahl wrote,on my timestamp of 18/02/2009 6:14 AM:
    Amazing. And here I am shooting mainly film since I forgot when, and no one
    told me it had vanished!
    Ah well: another board added to the coffin of digital!
     
    Noons, Feb 18, 2009
    #3
  4. San Francisco Bay Area.
    I quick looked in my local Walgreen's but wasn't sure if they still had
    film or not. Longs Drugs, which is where I have my processing done,
    still has a little bit of Fuji film (same stuff I got at Target), but
    much more expensive. They used to have real deals where you could get it
    close to a buck a roll. (I also heard rumors that they're considering
    dropping their photofinishing business.)

    Target closed their film processing counters last month.
    So what do you think the chances are of this same thing happening to the
    Fuji 6x9 rangefinder? It's one of the cameras I still lust after, but is
    still beacoup bux.


    --
    Personally, I like Vista, but I probably won't use it. I like it
    because it generates considerable business for me in consulting and
    upgrades. As long as there is hardware and software out there that
    doesn't work, I stay in business. Incidentally, my company motto is
    "If this stuff worked, you wouldn't need me".

    - lifted from sci.electronics.repair
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 18, 2009
    #4
  5. David Nebenzahl

    Noons Guest

    Bill Graham wrote,on my timestamp of 18/02/2009 3:55 PM:
    I wish I had a dollar for every time that FUD crap has surfaced on the Usenet in
    the last 10 years...
     
    Noons, Feb 18, 2009
    #5
  6. Disappears altogether? I doubt it. Eventually film will join those things
    that people used to use and now only a few hobbists use, but is still
    avalaible. For example, morse code keys, leaded gasoline (or at least
    an additive to make it), home canning supplies, vacuum tubes, and so on.

    With the reduction in disposable income worldwide, they will dimminish in
    "for the heck of it" demand, but some people will stick with them, and others
    will take them up as ways of conserving money.

    What will "kill" film, is a cheap digital camera that produces results
    close enough to film that people will no longer buy film. Why pay $5 a
    roll for film, when you can get a digital camera for $10? With cell phone
    cameras, and kid's digital cameras (although to pricey and poor quality)
    already out there, it's going to happen soon.

    Compared to 40 years ago when I was a teenager, when you could get 3 or
    4 types of black and white film in 4 or 5 sizes and 3 types of color film
    in any drugstore, supermarket, etc. film has dryed up and gone away. But
    dissappear altogther? Not for a long time.

    Geoff.
     
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Feb 18, 2009
    #6
  7. I've got an even better "real" photo store nearby, my favorite Looking
    Glass Photo on Telegraph in Bezerkeley; not as big as Keeble, but minus
    the snobitude. They seem to be doing fine; of course, they sell a lot of
    digital stuff these days, but they still have a completely-stocked
    darkroom section, plus lots of film (including sheet film in their freezer).

    I get film at Target because it's a lot cheaper.


    --
    Personally, I like Vista, but I probably won't use it. I like it
    because it generates considerable business for me in consulting and
    upgrades. As long as there is hardware and software out there that
    doesn't work, I stay in business. Incidentally, my company motto is
    "If this stuff worked, you wouldn't need me".

    - lifted from sci.electronics.repair
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 18, 2009
    #7
  8. David Nebenzahl

    Paul Furman Guest

    In SF, 'Photographer's Supply' is apparently still in business, though I
    haven't been there is probably 15 years.
    http://www.yelp.com/biz/photographers-supply-san-francisco-2

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 18, 2009
    #8
  9. David Nebenzahl

    Ken Hart1 Guest


    Taking this thread a bit sideways... Recently, a fashion designer contacted
    me about using my studio, specifically my high-key studio. He would do his
    own shooting on digital for his website and promo literture. While he was
    shooting in that studio, I was able to shoot some experimental and sample
    portraits in my other studio with his models. His models were all young
    (legal age of course) and had only ever worked with digital shooters,
    machine-gunning to hopefully get a good shot. They had never worked with a
    film photographer who would direct and pose them, making small adjustments
    to a foot, a hand, a sleeve, or a collar; then take one shot and move on to
    another pose or set. By the end of the day, the models had a appreciation
    for the difference between film and digital.

    Contrasting Mr Mendelson's next-to-last paragraph: what will "kill" digital
    (or at least give it a kick in the -ahem-) is people losing their photos due
    to the failure of their storage medium, whether it be faded inkjet printed
    pictures, failed hard drives, online storage companies that go under without
    notice, or CD's that get scratched. I've talked to people who have
    experienced these things, and while they still have their digital camera or
    cell phone camera, when it's an 'important' picture, they pull out the old
    film camera.

    I agree that film still has a lot of life to it.
     
    Ken Hart1, Feb 18, 2009
    #9
  10. One wonders if film company CEOs aren't thinking exactly the same thing
    and hedging their bets, just in case ...


    --
    Personally, I like Vista, but I probably won't use it. I like it
    because it generates considerable business for me in consulting and
    upgrades. As long as there is hardware and software out there that
    doesn't work, I stay in business. Incidentally, my company motto is
    "If this stuff worked, you wouldn't need me".

    - lifted from sci.electronics.repair
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 19, 2009
    #10
  11. David Nebenzahl

    Guest Guest

    it's not a fad.
     
    Guest, Feb 19, 2009
    #11
  12. David Nebenzahl

    Guest Guest

    nothing about digital prevents someone from taking their time and there
    were bulk film backs for power shooters.
    that's not a flaw of digital, that's just being lazy. plenty of people
    have lost film to mold, heat, natural fading, fire, flood, theft, etc.


    it's very easy to make a backup of a digital image and unlike film,
    every copy is *identical*. plus, they can be stored in multiple
    locations, making loss nearly impossible.
     
    Guest, Feb 19, 2009
    #12
  13. David Nebenzahl

    Colin.D Guest

    I rather think they will just get a digi p&s, and take the card in for
    printing, just the same as if it were film. The kids these days clamor
    to see the picture on the lcd, and it throws them when there is no
    viewing on a film camera.

    As has been mentioned, storage is still not something that people
    Yes, but what did she do with the negatives? Most people junk the negs
    when they have the prints, so archiving the images off the card wouldn't
    interest them, specially when Kodak proclaim you don't need the negs,
    just bring us the print to copy.
    Cellphones cameras may - should? - die out, but that cannot be
    extrapolated to include digital cameras.

    I used my film camera, an EOS 10, when I was in Hong Kong in 1993, and
    took hundreds of shots on negative film. The prints I got are pretty
    good still, but I have been thinking of making a sound-slide show from
    the negs, and started to scan them on my Canon 9950F, a high-end scanner.

    The scans are nowhere near as good as the prints. They show crossed
    color, i.e. green highlights and purple shadows. Clearly the film is
    not lasting too well after 15 years in the plastic sleeves and stored in
    the top of a wardrobe - a dry one at that. About the only film that
    lasts is Kodachrome, which is/was no good if you want prints.

    Granted, it can be easy to lose digital images, but diligent care and
    backup routines can greatly reduce the chances of loss, and as long as
    they exist the color will remain just as taken, unlike film. I know
    many people have stated that they have old negatives stored for umpteen
    years and they are perfect - until they come to scan or reprint them and
    they see what's happened to the dyes. Sub-optimal processing has a lot
    to do with how well negatives keep, and that's a completely unknown
    parameter.

    Kodak's term for dyes is 'fugitive'. What does that tell you about
    long-term storage?

    The short answer is, digital storage with sensible backups stored at
    multiple sites using the current technology of the time will give a
    digital image a theoretically infinite lifetime. Can you say that about
    negatives?


    Colin D.
     
    Colin.D, Feb 19, 2009
    #13
  14. David Nebenzahl

    Noons Guest

    Bill Graham wrote,on my timestamp of 19/02/2009 9:40 AM:
    Interestingly enough, mail order specialty shops are exactly and precisely the
    CHEAPEST way of getting film right now and have been for years, and getting
    cheaper by the minute.

    But nothing like spreading FUD, eh? ;)

    There is no such thing as film collectors, there will never be.
     
    Noons, Feb 19, 2009
    #14
  15. Yes, there are. There are a few people that collect old fim in it's
    original package. Often they collect other things, like instruction books,
    etc and many also collect cameras. They display the camera with the film that
    would have been available when the camera was sold.

    Geoff.
     
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Feb 19, 2009
    #15
  16. To which I can only say: [wait for it] ... Good riddance!


    --
    Personally, I like Vista, but I probably won't use it. I like it
    because it generates considerable business for me in consulting and
    upgrades. As long as there is hardware and software out there that
    doesn't work, I stay in business. Incidentally, my company motto is
    "If this stuff worked, you wouldn't need me".

    - lifted from sci.electronics.repair
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 21, 2009
    #16
  17. David Nebenzahl

    Summer Wind Guest

    I'm going to an orchid show tomorrow with my Elan 7N, shooting both color
    and B&W film. Film is alive and well in my world.

    SW
     
    Summer Wind, Feb 21, 2009
    #17
  18. David Nebenzahl

    Colin.D Guest

    You have the personal freedom, David, to use any recording medium you
    want, even a shoebox with a pinhole.

    But you have to realize that your preferences are not my preferences,
    nor anyone else's.

    Digital is capable of long-term storage, more so than any film, provided
    attention is paid to that storage - just as with film.

    But, film does deteriorate even in ideal storage (usually within one
    lifetime), which digital images don't. Why do you think that high-end
    or professional photogs who shoot with film go to the trouble of
    scanning and storing the digital images as as well as the film originals?

    Quoting 'the vast majority' includes people who use cameras purely for
    social occasions, with no thought or need to preserve what they take.
    Using those types as an argument against digital is totally specious.

    Colin D.
     
    Colin.D, Feb 21, 2009
    #18
  19. Not really, when the substance of their photographs is ****-all worth
    saving. With digital, more quantity == less quality. Not specious at all.


    --
    Personally, I like Vista, but I probably won't use it. I like it
    because it generates considerable business for me in consulting and
    upgrades. As long as there is hardware and software out there that
    doesn't work, I stay in business. Incidentally, my company motto is
    "If this stuff worked, you wouldn't need me".

    - lifted from sci.electronics.repair
     
    David Nebenzahl, Feb 22, 2009
    #19
  20. David Nebenzahl

    Robert Coe Guest

    : I still shoot slide film in my F5......I haven't seen anything digital yet
    : that compares with the brilliant colors I get. But, the handwriting is on
    : the wall, and I know that it's only a question of time before film
    : disappears altogether.....

    It's not just in photography either. It's very difficult to find steam-powered
    automobiles anymore.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 28, 2009
    #20
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