Resdy to buy

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by jim, Sep 4, 2010.

  1. jim

    jim Guest

    I've putzed around with digital cameras for years and am now ready to take
    the plunge and purchase a DSLR. I'm pretty sure it's gonna be a Canon EOS
    Rebel XSi. Any input from you posters would be appreciated. Really I don't
    want to compare brands, just some input with Canon cameras and their
    reliability, photo quality, etc., would be greatly appreciated.
     
    jim, Sep 4, 2010
    #1
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  2. jim

    jim Guest

    too bad I don't know how to spell !!!!!!!!!!!!
     
    jim, Sep 5, 2010
    #2
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  3. jim

    Ofnuts Guest

    That's what I have. Very nice camera for the price, even nicer when you
    fit it with good lenses (the 18-55 IS kit lens isn't bad for the price,
    but you can find significantly better) because it's good enough to merit
    them. I had a slight mishap (built-in flash got stuck and would not pop
    out) fixed under warranty, otherwise I'm not over-careful with my gear
    and it's still in good shape after two years.
     
    Ofnuts, Sep 5, 2010
    #3
  4. jim

    Wilba Guest

    Most of the criticisms of that camera can be solved by avoiding the basic
    zone modes and shooting raw. You should do that anyway, but it means you
    avoid problems like auto selection of the wrong AF point, no ability to
    compensate the exposure, and disappointing auto white balance.

    I don't know about other Canon series or other brands, but a significant
    number of Rebels are delivered with poor autofocus calibration. I had my
    450D and three lenses calibrated by Canon in Sydney and now it performs
    superbly, so there's nothing wrong with the design or build. It can take
    several trips and some effort to get it sorted (see
    http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/readflat.asp?forum=1031&message=31555078).

    I haven't tried one myself, but users of both claim that the 550D is
    significantly better (IQ, AF, etc.), and well worth the cost over the 450D.
    If you don't want video and need to minimise spending, you won't be
    disappointed with a well-calibrated 450D.
     
    Wilba, Sep 5, 2010
    #4
  5. jim

    Peter Guest


    You certainly set out troll bait. However, if you can get to a brick and
    mortar store, pick the one you feel handles best for you. However, you never
    state what type of photography you plan to do. For general purpose, what you
    propose wily be just fine. Even if you make a mistake, it's only money and
    correct it on the next upgrade.

    Enjoy
     
    Peter, Sep 5, 2010
    #5
  6. jim

    Peter Guest


    the above words came from a sick troll and cannot be relied upon.
     
    Peter, Sep 5, 2010
    #6
  7. jim

    Peter Guest


    Troll point proven. Knew it couldn't resist.
     
    Peter, Sep 5, 2010
    #7
  8. jim

    Tim Conway Guest

    I find it truly amazing how everyone is wrong and you are the only one who
    stumbled on the truth. If superzooms outperformed DSLRs so consistently,
    why don't the world's top photographers toss aside their expensive cameras
    and take them up? hmmm.
     
    Tim Conway, Sep 5, 2010
    #8
  9. jim

    Bruce Guest


    What makes you think you need a DSLR? What will you use it for that
    demands that you absolutely must have a DSLR?

    There is now a wide selection of P&S and superzoom cameras that offer
    very good image quality. They neatly avoid the hassle and expense of
    interchangeable lenses. They also avoid the hassle of expensive
    sensor cleaning because - except in extreme circumstances - dust just
    cannot get in.

    Entry-level DSLRs come with kit lenses that are optically mediocre.
    All the budget priced lenses for DSLRs are similarly mediocre. To get
    lenses of a quality that justifies having a DSLR, you are going to
    have to pay considerably more.

    So why not consider a top of the range zoom P&S, or a superzoom? You
    can probably find one that provides all the features and performance
    that you will ever need.
     
    Bruce, Sep 5, 2010
    #9
  10. jim

    Ofnuts Guest

    Show us the math... because I'm far from that and I definitely have
    better image quality than I ever had with my superzoom.
     
    Ofnuts, Sep 5, 2010
    #10
  11. jim

    Robert Coe Guest

    : >I've putzed around with digital cameras for years and am now ready to take
    : >the plunge and purchase a DSLR. I'm pretty sure it's gonna be a Canon EOS
    : >Rebel XSi. Any input from you posters would be appreciated. Really I don't
    : >want to compare brands, just some input with Canon cameras and their
    : >reliability, photo quality, etc., would be greatly appreciated.
    :
    :
    : What makes you think you need a DSLR? What will you use it for that
    : demands that you absolutely must have a DSLR?
    :
    : There is now a wide selection of P&S and superzoom cameras that offer
    : very good image quality. They neatly avoid the hassle and expense of
    : interchangeable lenses. They also avoid the hassle of expensive
    : sensor cleaning because - except in extreme circumstances - dust just
    : cannot get in.
    :
    : Entry-level DSLRs come with kit lenses that are optically mediocre.
    : All the budget priced lenses for DSLRs are similarly mediocre. To get
    : lenses of a quality that justifies having a DSLR, you are going to
    : have to pay considerably more.
    :
    : So why not consider a top of the range zoom P&S, or a superzoom? You
    : can probably find one that provides all the features and performance
    : that you will ever need.

    That's a bit patronizing, don't you think? What reason do we have to suppose
    that Jim's reasons for upgrading to a DSLR aren't valid? He's told us that
    he's already a digital camera user, and he's done enough homework to narrow
    his search to a particular well-established brand. You're asking him to go
    through the process again with us involved. Does everyone who asks a similar
    question in this newsgroup have to do that? Are we so experienced and smart
    that a decision made without our input should automatically be questioned?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 5, 2010
    #11
  12. jim

    Bruce Guest


    Today's superzooms are a long way ahead of where they were only a
    couple of years ago. At that time, stepping up to a DSLR meant a
    considerable improvement in image quality. That is much less the case
    now than it was then. DPReview's recent group test of superzooms
    makes interesting reading:
    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/Q110superzoomgroup/

    There are also some very high quality compact P&S cameras that have
    excellent 3X or 4X zoom lenses with plenty of attention paid in the
    design to the control of noise. These cameras, which include the
    Canon S90, Panasonic DMC-LX5 and the Samsung TL500, plus the slightly
    larger Canon G11, are capable of producing results that are
    practically indistinguishable from those made with DSLRs.

    At low ISOs, DSLRs with the usual poor quality consumer-grade kit
    lenses would struggle to produce results that equalled those from
    these point and shoot cameras.

    Probably more than 90% of DSLR owners would find that their needs are
    better served by a small-sensor camera, either one of the high quality
    compacts or one of the leading superzooms. But to many people, a DSLR
    is a badge that says a lot more about them than their results ever do.
     
    Bruce, Sep 5, 2010
    #12
  13. jim

    Bruce Guest


    It is sincere advice, sincerely given. Certainly not patronising.


    Because at least 90% of DSLR owners have no need of a DSLR.


    The OP stated "Any input from you posters would be appreciated." If
    the OP considers my advice irrelevant I am sure he is capable of
    ignoring it without any assistance from others.

    Different people have different opinions. The primary purpose of
    Usenet newsgroups is so that people can discuss - and potentially
    learn from - a variety of opinions.

    If you believe contrary opinions should be banned, as you appear to
    imply, then there would be absolutely no point to this newsgroup.

    There are quite a few one-brand online photo discussion forums where
    contrary opinions are banned. Perhaps you should join one of those
    rather than expose your over-sensitive persona to other Usenet users'
    independence of thought? ;-)
     
    Bruce, Sep 5, 2010
    #13
  14. jim

    SMS Guest

    You might want to consider the T1i instead, the extra capability and
    resolution is worth it.

    You also need to decide which lenses to buy. I'd suggest the EF-s 10-22,
    EF-S 18-200mm IS, and the EF 50mm f/1.8 II, though to start just the
    EF-S 18-200mm IS is sufficient.

    The kit lens that comes with that camera is not great.

    $684 Body
    $589 EF-S 18-200mm IS
    $765 EF-s 10-22
    $101 EF 50 1.8
    $443 Speedlite 580EX II (if you expect to do a lot of indoor photography)

    So you're at about $2500 to get started, not including filters or other
    accessories. I'd avoid the kits that include the EF-S 55-250 IS lens as
    that's a low end lens. The lenses in the list I provided are all close
    to L quality lenses in optics.
     
    SMS, Sep 5, 2010
    #14
  15. jim

    Ofnuts Guest

    Because you call that good pictures? make this simple test: load this
    picture (the first I tried...):

    http://a.img-dpreview.com/reviews/q110superzoomgroup/samples/specific/casioexh25_CIMG0507.JPG

    into your favorite photo editing software, and use the magic wand on one
    of the masts. See how jagged the selection is. In that same picture, the
    big motorboat on the right is a riddled with a greenish (on white) and
    blueish (on dark) color aberration.
    from far away. And when conditions are good (good light, enough time to
    focus....). And we aren't talking about superzooms anymore.
    because in a $350 P&S it isn't consumer-grade optics? And my experience
    is that at low ISO, my DLSR already does a lot better than superzooms
    (and thanks for the pointer to pictures that confirm that my 2-year old
    DSLR is still better than the current superzoom offerings).
    I still don't see the math... what DSLR body, lens... etc, would you
    use? Still all talk and no show?
     
    Ofnuts, Sep 5, 2010
    #15
  16. jim

    Ofnuts Guest

    It's adequate... It's the IS version, much better than the previous
    generation sold with the 300D/350D/400D and the 1000D. My only gripe
    against it is that at 18mm its distortion isn't regular and is very
    difficult to correct by software (mix of barrel and pincushion...) so
    that doesn't make it the perfect lens for architecture.

    And the 55-250 isn't that bad either for the price (but too short for
    what most people would use a zoom for). I eventually sold mine and
    replaced it with a 100mm f/2.8 macro (old version, sans IS, which is a
    bargain those days) and a Sigma 120-400.

    I wouldn't even talk about such a lens unless I know the OP is in the
    kind of photography that requires it.
    Yes, can be useful.
    Or look into Metz/Sunpak. Or find an old flash unit at a garage sale and
    use it in manual mode.
    or at whatever the Rebel sells nowadays, and not a penny more.
     
    Ofnuts, Sep 5, 2010
    #16
  17. jim

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : >: >I've putzed around with digital cameras for years and am now ready to take
    : >: >the plunge and purchase a DSLR. I'm pretty sure it's gonna be a Canon EOS
    : >: >Rebel XSi. Any input from you posters would be appreciated. Really I don't
    : >: >want to compare brands, just some input with Canon cameras and their
    : >: >reliability, photo quality, etc., would be greatly appreciated.
    : >:
    : >:
    : >: What makes you think you need a DSLR? What will you use it for that
    : >: demands that you absolutely must have a DSLR?
    : >:
    : >: There is now a wide selection of P&S and superzoom cameras that offer
    : >: very good image quality. They neatly avoid the hassle and expense of
    : >: interchangeable lenses. They also avoid the hassle of expensive
    : >: sensor cleaning because - except in extreme circumstances - dust just
    : >: cannot get in.
    : >:
    : >: Entry-level DSLRs come with kit lenses that are optically mediocre.
    : >: All the budget priced lenses for DSLRs are similarly mediocre. To get
    : >: lenses of a quality that justifies having a DSLR, you are going to
    : >: have to pay considerably more.
    : >:
    : >: So why not consider a top of the range zoom P&S, or a superzoom? You
    : >: can probably find one that provides all the features and performance
    : >: that you will ever need.
    : >
    : >That's a bit patronizing, don't you think?
    :
    :
    : It is sincere advice, sincerely given. Certainly not patronising.

    I didn't say it wasn't sincere. But if I were the OP, I'd consider it
    patronizing. If he doesn't, fine.

    : >What reason do we have to suppose
    : >that Jim's reasons for upgrading to a DSLR aren't valid?
    :
    :
    : Because at least 90% of DSLR owners have no need of a DSLR.

    Irrelevant if true, and a subjective judgement in any case.

    : >He's told us that
    : >he's already a digital camera user, and he's done enough homework to narrow
    : >his search to a particular well-established brand. You're asking him to go
    : >through the process again with us involved. Does everyone who asks a similar
    : >question in this newsgroup have to do that? Are we so experienced and smart
    : >that a decision made without our input should automatically be questioned?
    :
    :
    : The OP stated "Any input from you posters would be appreciated." If
    : the OP considers my advice irrelevant I am sure he is capable of
    : ignoring it without any assistance from others.
    :
    : Different people have different opinions. The primary purpose of
    : Usenet newsgroups is so that people can discuss - and potentially
    : learn from - a variety of opinions.
    :
    : If you believe contrary opinions should be banned, as you appear to
    : imply, then there would be absolutely no point to this newsgroup.

    How can you possibly read that into what I said? All I did was point out that
    the OP asked us a rather specific question; and rather than try to answer it,
    you began to question the decisions (already made) that motivated the
    question. In the absence of any evidence that those decisions were made in
    haste or on insufficient research, I thought it was patronizing.

    : There are quite a few one-brand online photo discussion forums where
    : contrary opinions are banned. Perhaps you should join one of those
    : rather than expose your over-sensitive persona to other Usenet users'
    : independence of thought? ;-)

    I assume that's an allusion to the fact that I'm a Canon owner, which is
    silly. I don't care what brand of camera he buys or why he's leaning towards
    Canon. My reference to a "well-established brand" was only in the context that
    if he were about to pick, say, a Sigma or Sony or Olympus DSLR, there *might*
    be more reason to doubt that he had done his homework. If he were leaning
    towards Nikon or Pentax, I'd have said exactly what I did say.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 5, 2010
    #17
  18.  
    Superzooms Still Win, Sep 6, 2010
    #18
  19. Well said.
     
    Superzooms Still Win, Sep 6, 2010
    #19
  20. Funny, all the DSLR TROLLS that jump into and hijack any thread about
    someone wanting a high-quality superzoom or compact camera do exactly that.
    Typing from experience are you? Got a mirror?

    You've got about seven more years of people pushing compacts and superzoom
    cameras in every thread about DSLRs before your fuckingly useless
    DSLR-TROLLS' relentless behavior can be called even-up. That is of course,
    if every last one of you moronic DSLR TROLLS stopped hijacking threads this
    very day. You've still got a seven-year deficit of getting the very same
    behavior paid in return until it could be remotely called "even". It just
    depends on if you want to keep doing it and extending that seven-years from
    every day you keep doing it, or just stop now and only have to deal with
    seven more years of it. It's all up to you, the lousy thread-hijacking
    DSLR-TROLLS.
     
    Superzooms Still Win, Sep 6, 2010
    #20
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