Ricoh drivers

Discussion in 'Ricoh' started by Nick Maclaren, Nov 28, 2007.

  1. Do they REALLY support only Microsoft and Macintosh? That is a real
    pain, if so. A Web search finds that Ricoh have ported Linux onto
    one of their cameras, but that's not terribly helpful ....


    Regards,
    Nick Maclaren.
     
    Nick Maclaren, Nov 28, 2007
    #1
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  2. Nick Maclaren

    Chris Savage Guest

    Who are 'they?' Assuming Ricoh what are they supporting under Windows /
    OS/X? If you're only talking of the USB connection to get the photos
    from camera to computer, you'll do much better with a card reader, but
    most cameras these days look like a USB mass storage device which is
    natively supported by any OS with USB awareness.
    Indeed, I can't see how the OS on the camera would have any bearing on
    the OS on your computer. But what you said is probably not what you
    meant.
     
    Chris Savage, Nov 28, 2007
    #2
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  3. |> >
    |> > Do they REALLY support only Microsoft and Macintosh? That is a real
    |> > pain, if so.
    |>
    |> Who are 'they?' Assuming Ricoh what are they supporting under Windows /
    |> OS/X?

    God alone knows, without buying one. I hoped that someone could tell
    me. The language used in most manuals is Modern Gibberish.

    |> If you're only talking of the USB connection to get the photos
    |> from camera to computer, you'll do much better with a card reader, but
    |> most cameras these days look like a USB mass storage device which is
    |> natively supported by any OS with USB awareness.

    Yes, but is that true of Ricoh? I couldn't find any specification of
    that aspect, though it might have been buried somewhere. There are
    lots of ways in which even 'standard' interfaces can be used/abused
    to prevent access from particular systems.

    No, of course it's not done deliberately, but that makes little
    difference to the person who has bought a pup. I am not an expert
    on USB interfaces and formats, and really don't want to have to
    become one :-(

    |> > A Web search finds that Ricoh have ported Linux onto
    |> > one of their cameras, but that's not terribly helpful ....
    |>
    |> Indeed, I can't see how the OS on the camera would have any bearing on
    |> the OS on your computer. But what you said is probably not what you
    |> meant.

    No, that's what I meant ....


    Regards,
    Nick Maclaren.
     
    Nick Maclaren, Nov 28, 2007
    #3
  4. Nick Maclaren

    Chris Savage Guest

    Well, if you don't own the camera in question (CIQ) you could:

    Go to your local camera shop, or even a Jessops, and ask them to
    demonstrate the CIQ's connection to a PC without any Ricoh software
    installed.

    Trust that a) it's in no manufacturer's interest and b) probably beyond
    Ricoh's competence to engineer an in-house modification to the USB
    standard. This stuff is bought in as reference designs and everybody's
    works the same way.

    Pay the extra (no more than) £10 and buy a card reader when you get the
    CIQ. It really is the much better solution.
     
    Chris Savage, Nov 28, 2007
    #4
  5. |>
    |> > Yes, but is that true of Ricoh? I couldn't find any specification of
    |> > that aspect, though it might have been buried somewhere. There are
    |> > lots of ways in which even 'standard' interfaces can be used/abused
    |> > to prevent access from particular systems.
    |> >
    |> > No, of course it's not done deliberately, but that makes little
    |> > difference to the person who has bought a pup. I am not an expert
    |> > on USB interfaces and formats, and really don't want to have to
    |> > become one :-(
    |>
    |> Well, if you don't own the camera in question (CIQ) you could:
    |>
    |> Go to your local camera shop, or even a Jessops, and ask them to
    |> demonstrate the CIQ's connection to a PC without any Ricoh software
    |> installed.
    |>
    |> Trust that a) it's in no manufacturer's interest and b) probably beyond
    |> Ricoh's competence to engineer an in-house modification to the USB
    |> standard. This stuff is bought in as reference designs and everybody's
    |> works the same way.

    You have missed the point. You don't NEED to do that to render things
    inoperable. I have decades of experience in this area, and one thing
    that I learnt over 30 years ago is never to rely on interoperability
    on those grounds alone. Here is one real life example where I have
    seen such an issue - it wasn't a camera, and it wasn't any systems
    currently available on a PC, but the principles are the same.

    The device saves files named by date and time in a user-friendly,
    rational format - e.g. '2007/11/28 17:16:23'. The supplied software
    uses very low-level interfaces, so would be happy with any string,
    but 'standard' USB software 'mounts' the storage as a 'filing system'
    (as it does, incidentally), so that becomes a file name.

    Kablooey!

    Now, YOU read a file name (NOT a path name) of that form under Unix,
    MacOS, and even most versions of Microsoft Windows :)

    I go back long enough to remember when it could be done, sometimes,
    and how - but those ratholes through the system interfaces were
    blocked up decades ago. Nowadays, you have no option but to drop
    down below the file system interface level. Yes, I could, but
    damned if I am going to for this purpose.

    It is very unlikely THAT particular ``gotcha'' is present, but there
    are a zillion similar ones that can be implemented without doing
    anything non-standard. Until and unless I get confirmation from
    someone trustworthy that Ricoh pictures can be read into (say) Linux
    via a standard USB mount, I shall remain unconvinced (either way).


    Regards,
    Nick Maclaren.
     
    Nick Maclaren, Nov 28, 2007
    #5
  6. Nick Maclaren

    Chris Savage Guest

    Obviously. It was an easy point to miss given that you've only just got
    around to actually making a point.
    An awful lot of industry experience in interoperability and standards
    has happened since the mid 1970s. Every camera manufacturer, with the
    possible exception of Canon, is happy to benefit from that exception.
    Apparently your decades of experience have left you with so many
    suspicions that the only possible answer to your lack of question is for
    you to get the CIQ and subject it to your testing regime.

    I don't think you'll find anyone else here, let alone substandard me
    (it's a couple of decades since anyone talked down to me as if I was a
    juvenile so thanks for that) who can answer questions that you can't be
    bothered asking.
    Do you think you could apply some of your experience to implementing a
    proper sig separator, please?
     
    Chris Savage, Nov 28, 2007
    #6
  7. |>
    |> An awful lot of industry experience in interoperability and standards
    |> has happened since the mid 1970s. Every camera manufacturer, with the
    |> possible exception of Canon, is happy to benefit from that exception.

    I have heard that one a few times before, as the actress said to the
    bishop :)

    |> Apparently your decades of experience have left you with so many
    |> suspicions that the only possible answer to your lack of question is for
    |> you to get the CIQ and subject it to your testing regime.

    What I am looking for is someone who has actually DONE it, or
    someone with definite information that either Ricoh or some known
    software supports it.

    I wasn't expecting trouble, until a Web search turned up essentially
    no relevant hits. The most relevant ones were references to a Linux
    driver, dated 2002, and the Ricoh project to port Linux TO a camera.
    At that point, my mental alarm bells started ringing intermittently.
    A similar search for Sony found precisely the sort of hit I expected,
    whereupon they went into continuous mode.


    Regards,
    Nick Maclaren.
     
    Nick Maclaren, Nov 28, 2007
    #7
  8. Nick Maclaren

    Chris Savage Guest

    Supports what?

    You still haven't defined what it is you're expecting these Ricoh
    drivers to dco for you and what problems you're anticipating.

    Somebody else is going to have to answer if you ever do get around to
    asking your question. I've had enough of you already.
    Even a simple "-- " appears beyond you.
     
    Chris Savage, Nov 28, 2007
    #8
  9. Nick Maclaren

    Marty Fremen Guest

    The camera's SD-card will appear as a USB mass storage device if you set
    the camera mode to "MASS STR". If you set it to "ORIGINAL" it will not
    appear as a drive and will only be accessible via Ricoh's proprietary
    software (which does nothing of interest IME apart from automatically copy
    tagged images across when you plug the camera in, it doesn't even give you
    a view of the card or let you delete files).
     
    Marty Fremen, Nov 29, 2007
    #9
  10. |> >
    |> > Do they REALLY support only Microsoft and Macintosh? That is a real
    |> > pain, if so. A Web search finds that Ricoh have ported Linux onto
    |> > one of their cameras, but that's not terribly helpful ....
    |>
    |> The camera's SD-card will appear as a USB mass storage device if you set
    |> the camera mode to "MASS STR". If you set it to "ORIGINAL" it will not
    |> appear as a drive and will only be accessible via Ricoh's proprietary
    |> software (which does nothing of interest IME apart from automatically copy
    |> tagged images across when you plug the camera in, it doesn't even give you
    |> a view of the card or let you delete files).

    Thank you! That is really helpful.


    Regards,
    Nick Maclaren.
     
    Nick Maclaren, Nov 29, 2007
    #10
  11. I connected my Caplio R7 to my Fedora 8 PC and it asked me if I would like
    to import the photos to my album! I can also read the memory card using
    my SD card reader.

    HTH!

    I did not much like the Ricoh Windows software that came with the R7.
    Frankly I prefer the Olympus stuff which you can download for free.
     
    Michael Chare, Dec 5, 2007
    #11
  12. |>
    |> > Do they REALLY support only Microsoft and Macintosh? That is a real
    |> > pain, if so. A Web search finds that Ricoh have ported Linux onto one
    |> > of their cameras, but that's not terribly helpful ....
    |>
    |> I connected my Caplio R7 to my Fedora 8 PC and it asked me if I would like
    |> to import the photos to my album! I can also read the memory card using
    |> my SD card reader.
    |>
    |> HTH!
    |>
    |> I did not much like the Ricoh Windows software that came with the R7.
    |> Frankly I prefer the Olympus stuff which you can download for free.

    Thanks very much. That is very useful. I looked at some of the
    dcoumentation (once I knew what to look for), and it seems that
    Ricoh have now dropped their idiosyncratic mode altogether.
    I didn't check before the R4, so I don't know if the earliest ones
    has only that mode - it is very likely - the R4 defaulted to it,
    but could be changed.



    Regards,
    Nick Maclaren.
     
    Nick Maclaren, Dec 5, 2007
    #12
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