Rolleiflex SL35 Battery Check

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Chris Loffredo, Feb 14, 2004.

  1. Hi,

    I just received a nice SL35 which has an out-of-whack meter.

    5 minutes to get the top off and I find... 3 adjustment trimmers!
    I assume one is for adjusting the BC, so if someone can tell me how the
    battery check is suppossed to be done (no, no button with "bc" on
    it...), I can eliminate at least one variable from the problem.
    If you can also tell me what each trimmer does, then you reach hero
    status!!!!

    Thanks,

    Chris
     
    Chris Loffredo, Feb 14, 2004
    #1
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  2. FIRST, assuming you haven't already done so, DON'T touch the trimmers!
    (and if you ever do, mark or photograph the exact original positions
    first.)

    OK. I used to sell the SL35 when it was new... I know a bit about them.

    First, the camera has no provision for a battery test function, so
    don't look for one. The original mercury battery had the characteristic
    of working correctly until it died; it was nearly an all-or-nothing
    proposition.

    Second, what kind of battery are you using to "check" the meter? This
    camera was designed to use the now unavailable PX13 or PX625 mercury
    cells; most other batteries (like the current ALKALINE variant of the
    625) will produce incorrect exposures - typically by two or more stops.
    Don't assume there's anything wrong with it until you check it with an
    appropriate battery. I use Wein air cells, which, while short-lived,
    put out the correct voltage.

    Third, even with the correct battery, don't expect modern performance
    from the meter. The SL-35 uses the old CdS technology; which is slow
    and has a memory effect. Even in bright sunlight, it may take two or
    three seconds for the needle to settle down, while you hold down the
    stop-down button. And AFTER being in bright sunlight, it may take
    several minutes to give accurate readings indoors. And the low-light
    sensitivity is frankly terrible.

    That said, I liked the SL35. It was a solid if uninspiring platform for
    some spectacular lenses. The later Singapore models (SL25E, etc.)
    existed solely to make the original look more reliable) <Grin>

    -- Scott Schuckert
     
    Scott Schuckert, Feb 16, 2004
    #2
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