Sandisk 12 in 1 Card Reader

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Chuck Olson, Jun 24, 2007.

  1. Chuck Olson

    Chuck Olson Guest

    I looked for reviews on this reader and found some dated back in 2005. Many
    gave it 5 stars, so it appeared to be an excellent product. But for some
    reason, the specifications for the current product SDDR-89-A15 have never
    been updated by many vendors that carry it, so the fact that it now supports
    SDHC cards was a surprise when I found it on a peg at Best Buy. SDHC
    compatibility was the "acid test" for a reader that is reasonably
    up-to-date, so I bought it. Installation was very simple on my Windows ME
    machine (I know, time to catch up with the world) and it works perfectly. I
    have a set of photos, about 88MB, that it read into memory in 6.75 seconds,
    for 13.04MB/sec transfer rate from a 2GB CF card. Not bad.

    Now this reader has a pushbutton. There's a CDROM furnished with the reader
    that contains what they call "Button Application" software. One might expect
    that the pushbutton does something good and that this is necessary for it to
    work correctly. Wrong. The software is a reasonably useful image management
    program (I presume - - I never actually used it), and provides two
    functions,"Transfer All Files" and "Use Photo Tools". Installation puts an
    Icon on the desktop - - so much for needing the pushbutton. Also,
    transferring any files to the computer automatically starts the software - -
    sorry, pushbutton, you lose again. Okay, there's nothing wrong with all
    that - - time marches on, and the pushbutton just got displaced in the
    eagerness of the software programmer. Nothing lost, nothing gained - - wrong
    again. After installing the software on my admittedly ancient machine, I ran
    into a rash of hard lockups - - suddenly, although the cursor seems still
    alive, it doesn't do anything when I click on stuff. Can't even ctl-alt-del
    out of the condition. I uninstalled the pushbutton software and the computer
    came back to its old, dependable self. Too bad - - I had hopes for that
    programmer.

    But the reader is still really terrific! You can hot plug and unplug the USB
    connection (unplugging will get you a complaint message that you didn't use
    the "eject" icon, but as long as all the slots were empty, who cares? A
    yellow light says the reader is connected. Inserting media lights a green
    light (one of four), and it stays lit even after executing the "eject"
    procedure, but if the green isn't flashing, you can pull the media out
    anyway - - it's safe - - the drive has been deleted. If you want to go back
    with more pictures then, there's a problem since the drive letter for that
    slot is gone. Here's where the USB hot unplug followed by hot plug feature
    comes in. Unfortunately you get another bawling out message, but no matter.
    Everything's fine and all four drive letters are again present and the new
    shots can be transferred. To make all this easy, a short USB extension cable
    for conveniently located hot plugging helps a lot. Have fun!

    Chuck
     
    Chuck Olson, Jun 24, 2007
    #1
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  2. Chuck Olson

    Robert Coe Guest

    I looked for reviews on this reader and found some dated back in 2005. Many
    : gave it 5 stars, so it appeared to be an excellent product. But for some
    : reason, the specifications for the current product SDDR-89-A15 have never
    : been updated by many vendors that carry it, so the fact that it now supports
    : SDHC cards was a surprise when I found it on a peg at Best Buy. SDHC
    : compatibility was the "acid test" for a reader that is reasonably
    : up-to-date, so I bought it. Installation was very simple on my Windows ME
    : machine (I know, time to catch up with the world) and it works perfectly. I
    : have a set of photos, about 88MB, that it read into memory in 6.75 seconds,
    : for 13.04MB/sec transfer rate from a 2GB CF card. Not bad.
    :
    : Now this reader has a pushbutton. There's a CDROM furnished with the reader
    : that contains what they call "Button Application" software. One might expect
    : that the pushbutton does something good and that this is necessary for it to
    : work correctly. Wrong. The software is a reasonably useful image management
    : program (I presume - - I never actually used it), and provides two
    : functions,"Transfer All Files" and "Use Photo Tools". Installation puts an
    : Icon on the desktop - - so much for needing the pushbutton. Also,
    : transferring any files to the computer automatically starts the software - -
    : sorry, pushbutton, you lose again. Okay, there's nothing wrong with all
    : that - - time marches on, and the pushbutton just got displaced in the
    : eagerness of the software programmer. Nothing lost, nothing gained - - wrong
    : again. After installing the software on my admittedly ancient machine, I ran
    : into a rash of hard lockups - - suddenly, although the cursor seems still
    : alive, it doesn't do anything when I click on stuff. Can't even ctl-alt-del
    : out of the condition. I uninstalled the pushbutton software and the computer
    : came back to its old, dependable self. Too bad - - I had hopes for that
    : programmer.

    Possibly the function of the pushbutton is to clear the lockup caused by the
    pushbutton software.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Jun 25, 2007
    #2
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  3. My story is not quite the same but I'm on my second one. The first one had
    a bad xD slot, the system would lock up anytime an xD card was put in. The
    replacement unit has been working flawlessly.
     
    Peter A. Stavrakoglou, Jun 25, 2007
    #3
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