scanner/pdf/paperport question

Discussion in 'Scanners' started by Rod Kenly, Dec 23, 2003.

  1. Rod Kenly

    Rod Kenly Guest

    I've been pondering the thought of finally scanning all my documents -
    bills-donations-etc and then shredding the originals.

    My plan is to scan into a PDF file with a filename (electric_dec03.pdf) and
    then burning a CD at the end of the year. That way I have IRS document (got
    audited this year - owed them an addition $200 with interest - big whoop),
    and get rid of all the paper.

    Is it enough just to use Adobe Acrobat (I have 5.05), or do I need something
    more? - along the lines of paperport 9.0 or an upgrade to Acrobat 6.0X or
    what?

    TIA,
     
    Rod Kenly, Dec 23, 2003
    #1
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  2. Before destroying your originals, I would contact the IRS and ask if
    digital copies of documents are acceptible as proof of expenditures.
    I would suspect that they are not, due to the ease of altering digital
    documents, including pdf files.
    I did a quick search at http://www.irs.gov/ but was unable to find any
    info on digital documents as acceptible proof.
     
    Bill Schnakenberg, Dec 23, 2003
    #2
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  3. In my under-educated opinion, I guess it depends what you're going to do
    with them. If you are going to create an interactive document, then yes, you
    may want to opt for a more current version of Acrobat. If you want to create
    one master file of the "images" of these bills, then scan away with what you
    have, print the graphic to a PDF and then use Acrobat to collect the images
    in a cohesive document. Acrobat 5.x will allow the creation of an indexed
    document, so you could still file the bills in a manner of your choosing.

    I am basically doing this now with rebate coupons, etc, where copies of the
    register receipt are required. I scan the receipt as a graphic, eliminate
    any unnecessary information (credit card info) and then print (or convert
    to) a PDF for my records and a hardcopy for submission. No OCR is needed for
    this scenario, I just use my scanner as a selective copier.

    I love Acrobat 6, but if what you have works, why upgrade? Acrobat 6 does
    allow more interactive options than the previous version did, but if you're
    not using these features, you don't have much rationale to upgrade. I'm not
    familiar with Paperport, but I presume it is OCR software. Same opinion: If
    you're not extracting the text for a specific purpose, why buy software you
    may not need? Save you money for more important stuff, stuff you really
    need, like your next scanner or a 21 inch graphics quality LCD monitor ;-{)
     
    Major Malfunction, Dec 23, 2003
    #3
  4. Rod Kenly

    Rod Kenly Guest

    The IRS started in 1996 to allow electronic copies of all documents. It is
    on their website. I forget the search criteria - but the basic requirement
    is that it has to be legible.
     
    Rod Kenly, Dec 24, 2003
    #4
  5. Rod Kenly

    mk Guest


    I have both PaperPort and Acrobat 6. I would not dream of using the
    latter for your purpose.

    PP is a good front end for managing files. Acrobat just creates them.
    In PP you can see what you want by looking at "thumbnails" of the
    files. You can also "stack" a series of documents.

    Many of these things are possible in Acrobat, but it takes longer and
    is more complicated.

    MK
     
    mk, Dec 28, 2003
    #5
  6. Rod Kenly

    Rod Kenly Guest

    Thanks for the heads up. I will look into Paperport. It seems like I had a
    copy of it 3 or 4 years ago - but I wasn't too impressed. I'll look at it
    again.
     
    Rod Kenly, Dec 28, 2003
    #6
  7. I never worked with Paper Port, so I can't compare it to Acrobat, but
    Acrobat does indeed do all you are using Paper Port for. I guess it comes
    down to personal preferences: Make a choice and learn to work with it.
     
    Major Malfunction, Dec 28, 2003
    #7
  8. Rod Kenly

    mk Guest


    Well, you speak from a position of great knowl;edge, not having used
    PaperPort.

    Believe me, PP does those things much more easily than Acrobat.

    To stack pages in Acrobat, for example, you have to open the file then
    introduce the new pages. In PP you just drag one on top of the other.

    Acrobat offers no filing features. It just creates files that you can
    put where you want them. Quite how you would use it as a front end for
    a filing system escapes me. And I have thousands of pdf files.

    One feature I forgot to mention was the ability to clean up scanned
    files, removing speckles, straightening and so on.

    I have mentioned just a few of the many things that PP does better
    than Acrobat. I suggest trying it before jumping to any conclusions.

    MK
     
    mk, Dec 29, 2003
    #8
  9. As I said, make a choice and work with it. I am supporting your choice.
    There are many different solutions to the same problem and there are many
    different choices in software to handle a task. If there was one truly Best
    Of Anything, all the other brands would fold up. Ask three people what the
    best car on the road is and you'll likely get four opinions ;-{) For many
    people, the best software is what they started with. This is not a bad
    thing, in fact it is a good thing, they've learned all the ins and outs,
    all the undocumented shortcuts and know every tweak.

    I admit, such is my case with Acrobat. I started using it as a reader and
    moved to the full Acrobat with version 5.0 when I needed those capabilities.
    As I needed to do more tasks relating to PDF preparation, and document
    management, I learned more tricks with Acrobat. This does not mean I think
    it is superior, it just means I know it, I am comfortable with it and have
    not found any shortcoming with Acrobat. With your knowledge of PaperPort,
    you can perform the same tasks because you know it so well. This is a good
    thing.

    Peace to you,
    Happy New year
     
    Major Malfunction, Dec 31, 2003
    #9
  10. Rod Kenly

    Rod Kenly Guest

    It wasn't MY intent to cause an agrument here. I was looking for some
    advice.

    I tried unsuccessfully about 4 (maybe 5) years ago to do this same thing -
    move to an electronic solution of all the stacks of paper that I had. At
    the time, I had a home business requiring me to keep stuff for seven years.
    So I still have bunches of boxes stacked around my old office.

    Back then I tried to use a recommended program - "PageKeeper" from the same
    folks that do Paperport. I had read an article on it, and tried it. I
    invested a LOT of time in it. Scanning stuff for weeks in my spare time.
    Then pagekeeper burped, and I lost a lot of it. I went to the backups to
    recover - did so, and some time later, the software burped again.

    It seemed that I was taking 1 step forward, and 2 back - and I gave up in
    disgust. That software package has since been dropped by the Paperport
    folks. Unfortunately, with all the pain associated with trying to use an
    electronic means I gave up at the time.

    However, I'm going to try this again - starting tomorrow (the 1st). I've
    made up my mind that I'm going to try to use Acrobat. I got my upgrade
    yesterday (from 5.05), and have got it installed. I intend to play with it
    some tomorrow, and hopefully it will answer the bill.

    If you've got some tweaks, shortcuts, etc - I would be very happy to hear
    about them.

    Thanks
     
    Rod Kenly, Dec 31, 2003
    #10
  11. Welcome to the Wild West of the Internet! Skirmishes happen all the time, so
    don't worry.

    Whichever program you pick, learn all the tricks you can. There are a wide
    range of capable programs and each has a dedicated core of followers. If it
    solves your problem, you've made the correct choice.
     
    Major Malfunction, Dec 31, 2003
    #11
  12. Just to clarify, did you get the full Adobe package, or just the reader? If
    you have Acrobat Standard or Pro, Adobe has a nice downloadable tutorial at
    (watch for line wrap)

    http://www.adobe.com/education/curriculum/main.html

    If you really want to get into it, try the Classroom in a Book (CIB)for
    Acrobat. You can probably get one used through Amazon. I'm using the
    individual books Adobe Creative Suite and they are well written and
    extremely helpful. I've not used the CIB for Acrobat, but I have perused it
    at a local bookstore and it seems as well written as the rest of the series
    that I do have.
     
    Major Malfunction, Dec 31, 2003
    #12
  13. Rod Kenly

    Rod Kenly Guest

    I got Standard 6.0. I got the tutorial from the above location. I've
    glanced through all of it this morning, and will play with some of the
    specific lessons that I think will be great for filing & accessing records
    in the future.

    Thanks for this info.
     
    Rod Kenly, Jan 1, 2004
    #13
  14. Rod Kenly

    mk Guest


    Good advice. But asking "Acrobat versus PaperPort" is bound to get an
    Acrobat centred response. It simply has more users.

    Too late now, but anyone really wanting to search this issue should
    get out a bit and ask in a number of places. Acrobat and PaperPort.

    I use both, and love them for their skills.

    One thing where they are both comparable is in the poverty of direct
    support to customers. Acrobat has better user to user support, mostly
    because it has more users (see above).

    There is a Yahoo! group of PaperPort "victims".

    MK

    PS I would not dream of taking advice seriously from someone who says
    "I have never used Paperport (or Acrobat) but..."
     
    mk, Jan 2, 2004
    #14
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