Scanning in film camera photo lab prints?

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by What's In A Name?, Sep 21, 2004.

  1. I realize this might be a bit off topic but I hope someone can confirm this.

    I had asked my all in one tech support for my lexmark machine what
    resolution I should scan photos that were taken with a film camera/developed
    at a local photo lab etc so that I may print those scanned images out in
    sizes up to 8x10. He said I only needed to go as high as 300dpi, anything
    higher would make the scanner work really slow and then anything higher
    would just be a waste of space on my drive. He said my prints would be
    outstanding.

    Can anyone confirm this?

    Thanks.
     
    What's In A Name?, Sep 21, 2004
    #1
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  2. What's In A Name?

    Bob Williams Guest

    Tech Support is basically correct.
    A print from a local photolab only has about 300 pixel/inch of
    information. So scanning it at anything higher just gives you a larger
    file size but no additional image information. (You can't get something
    for nothing).
    Keep in mind, however, that if your original print is 4 x 6, the image
    quality of an 8 x 10 will suffer somewhat in comparison. But it will
    still be pretty good. You MIGHT help yourself a little bit by resampling
    the image in Photoshop (Bicubic Interpolation) so your image will be
    8x10 at 300 pixels/inch. This may smooth out pixelation a little bit.
    Bob Williams
     
    Bob Williams, Sep 21, 2004
    #2
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  3. I agree that scanning at 300dpi is probably adequate but, if you
    intend to do any resizing or clipping, 600dpi would be better, IMHO. I
    don't find that a 600dpi scan of a 4x6 print is particularly slow on
    my relatively inexpensive Canon D1250.
     
    James Silverton, Sep 21, 2004
    #3
  4. What's In A Name?

    Big Bill Guest

    I think you'd be better off scanning at a resolution that will get you
    300PPI *at the final printed size*.
    IOW, to print that 4x6 at 8x10, scan at 600PPI; that'll get you 300PPI
    at 8x10.

    Bill Funk
    Change "g" to "a"
     
    Big Bill, Sep 21, 2004
    #4
  5. What's In A Name?

    Bob Williams Guest

    It all sounds logical except that a drugstore print does not have more
    than 300 pixels/inch of image information. If that's all the information
    that is present, you can scan until you are blue in the face and you
    cannot get more information than that from the scan. For instance, if
    you scan a 4x5 print at 600 ppi/dpi, you will, indeed, generate a file
    with 7.2MP of data but remember, your original print had only 4x5 @ 300
    ppi or 1.8 MP. of image information. Where did the new pixels come from?
    Suppose you scanned the 4x5 print at 1200 dpi. You would generate a 28.8
    MP file. Even though the math says you can print a 16 x 20 print at 300
    dpi, (which should be excellent quality), you know intuitively that this
    cannot be possible and it isn't.
    You may get a warm fuzzy feeling from scanning a drugstore print at 600
    dpi, but the extra data is bogus. You could get the same effect by
    scanning a 4x5 at 300 dpi and resampling in Photoshop to 8x10 at 300 ppi.
    A worthwhile read would be a book called Scantips by our resident
    scanning guru, Wayne Fulton. See especially:
    http://www.scantips.com/basics08.html
    Bob Williams
     
    Bob Williams, Sep 22, 2004
    #5
  6. What's In A Name?

    Bob Williams Guest

    A "Drugstore Print" is a generic term for a print made commercially for
    the general public. It doesn't really make much difference whether,
    Walgreens, WalMart, or Kodak makes the print. It still contains only
    about 300 dpi resolution, and scanning at 600 dpi will not create more
    image information than scanning at 300 dpi. Scanning a color print at
    600 dpi is basically equivalent to scanning it at 300 dpi and resampling
    to 600 dpi.in a photo editor.
    Wayne Fulton (Scantips) has this to say:
    "I am suggesting that the real life benefit of scanning 35 mm color
    prints above 300 dpi is mostly wishful thinking."
    Bob
     
    Bob Williams, Sep 24, 2004
    #6
  7. What's In A Name?

    Big Bill Guest

    What I saw was this:
    "I had asked my all in one tech support for my lexmark machine what
    resolution I should scan photos that were taken with a film
    camera/developed at a local photo lab etc so that I may print those
    scanned images out in sizes up to 8x10."
    No mention of a drug store there.
    While what you say may well be true, there's nothng to say the OP was
    dealing with a drug store.
    He *may* have been, but he didn't say he was.

    Bill Funk
    Change "g" to "a"
     
    Big Bill, Oct 22, 2004
    #7
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