Screwed by Canon Rebate

Discussion in 'Canon' started by John, Dec 29, 2006.

  1. John

    John Guest

    I know that the institution of rebates is meant to rip you off so I'm
    quite anal about paying attention to the details and ALWAYS sending in
    the rebate with delivery confirmation. The delivery confirmation at
    least minimizes the "Sorry, we never received your rebate" or "Sorry, we
    didn't receive your rebate in time" excuses.

    I read the rebate forms several times looking for the "gotcha's". I know
    I go through way more trouble than I should for $20-$50 but it's the
    principle. They make it as annoying as possible to claim a rebate so
    that most people won't bother. I'm the one that bothers.

    I send in my rebate to Canon along with all the rebate form, purchase
    receipt and I cut out the UPC code from the box and put that in the
    envelope. My new tactic is to use wide tape and tape the UPC code to
    the rebate form.

    I checked on my rebate status just now.

    Error(s): An original qualifying UPC was not included

    Yep. No matter how hard I tried, Canon still managed to screw me over.

    Since they want "an original" qualifying UPC", my copy won't suffice.

    Canon, the next time I'm in the market for a product I'll remember this
    incident.
     
    John, Dec 29, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. John

    RichA Guest

    Mail-in rebates are always a scam. Why do they do them? Because
    people buy based on this.
    50-80% never claim them.
    Rebates take 8-12 weeks and often are never delivered, another 50%
    forget about them.
    They force you to call someone to fix the problem or ask where your
    rebate is 16 weeks past due delivery time.
    At the end of it all, according to various business studies, only 3% of
    rebates are ever paid out. So, they can boost sales with what might
    amount to a 0.5% overall discount paid.
    It is business genius.
     
    RichA, Dec 29, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. John

    Malcolm Hoar Guest

    Try contacting the retailer from whom you made the purchase.

    The courts have recently ruled that the retailer is legally
    bound to honor the rebate.

    I am hopeful that this ruling will help bring about the demise
    of the rebate scam.

    --
    |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
    | Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
    | Gary Player. |
    | http://www.malch.com/ Shpx gur PQN. |
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Malcolm Hoar, Dec 29, 2006
    #3
  4. John

    k Guest

    You know, I wonder about these rebate centers. I've had that exact same
    thing happen to me twice in the last half-dozen years; once for a Sony
    rebate and once for a Hitachi rebate. I wonder if these rebate centers
    aren't scamming the manufacturers somehow, and cheating some percentage of
    customers, while still accepting the money from the mfgrs.
     
    k, Dec 29, 2006
    #4
  5. John

    J.A. Michel Guest

    Rebates are such a RIP! Just give me a good deal up front, with no BS.
    I got ripped off on a 30.00 rebate on a Netgear networking kit one time.
    They rejected my rebate because my address was a PO box. What bullshit.
    I guess that was a good enough excuse for them.

    Not everyone has the luxury of home-delivered mail - some of us live in
    small towns.
     
    J.A. Michel, Dec 29, 2006
    #5
  6. John

    measekite Guest

    Malcolm Hoar wrote:

    I know that the institution of rebates is meant to rip you off so I'm quite anal about paying attention to the details and ALWAYS sending in the rebate with delivery confirmation. The delivery confirmation at least minimizes the "Sorry, we never received your rebate" or "Sorry, we didn't receive your rebate in time" excuses. I read the rebate forms several times looking for the "gotcha's". I know I go through way more trouble than I should for $20-$50 but it's the principle. They make it as annoying as possible to claim a rebate so that most people won't bother. I'm the one that bothers. I send in my rebate to Canon along with all the rebate form, purchase receipt and I cut out the UPC code from the box and put that in the envelope. My new tactic is to use wide tape and tape the UPC code to the rebate form. I checked on my rebate status just now. Error(s): An original qualifying UPC was not included Yep. No matter how hard I tried, Canon still managed to screw me over. Since they want "an original" qualifying UPC", my copy won't suffice. Canon, the next time I'm in the market for a product I'll remember this incident.



    Try contacting the retailer from whom you made the purchase. The courts have recently ruled that the retailer is legally bound to honor the rebate.


    What court and what state?


    I am hopeful that this ruling will help bring about the demise of the rebate scam.
     
    measekite, Dec 29, 2006
    #6
  7. John

    tom Guest

    I have successfully gotten 3 rebates (all at the same time, a package
    deal about this time last year) from Canon. Took a while, but they did
    pay off.


    I'd try appealing to whoever is appropriate and sending the copy with
    all the documentation that you have...might just do the trick. Never know.

    I can certainly understand the sentiment...have had some NOT pay off on
    rebates (have a data base set up for when to expect the money back etc).
    But you know, I have somewhat recently taken the approach that I will
    *not* play the rebate game. I look for the "instant rebate" or the best
    price without the rebate trying to encourage the folks that don't
    indulge in this garbage. I've heard a while back that Best Buy was going
    to be rebate-free sometime RSN...that was about a year to 1.5 years
    ago...guess they're not rushing in to anything. <g>

    Just wanted to let you know that Canon has paid off in the past (at
    least for me).

    Tom
     
    tom, Dec 29, 2006
    #7
  8. I get every damn rebate I file, so I'm saving money at the expense of
    illiterates/incompetents - so what?
     
    Bob (but not THAT Bob), Dec 29, 2006
    #8
  9. John

    # Fred # Guest

    I think most companies factor in that you forget to send in the rebate
    rather than trying to scam you. By law they have to provide the rebate
    check unless the company goes under.

    One company I used to know, you have to call in and asked the status of the
    rebate first before they would cut the check.

    Another company has so many UPC labels or UPC look alike labels (a few on
    the retail box plus couple more on the inside) that I send everything that
    remotely look like the UPC. Don't know the intend was to confuse but I had a
    rebate for $100 and they said I didn't send in the real UPC.

    If you purchase a few items with one receipt and all the rebate forms
    required the original receipt then you're kinda screwed.

    I had a few different promotions form the same company with only one receipt
    but they only send me one rebate with the smaller amount.

    I have good luck with rebates from Costco and Microsoft - that's like money
    in the pocket.

    Don't do rebates much anymore, just not worth the extra effort.
     
    # Fred #, Dec 29, 2006
    #9
  10. John

    Malcolm Hoar Guest

    My bad. It wasn't the courts per se, it was the FTC:

    http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2005/03/compusa.htm

    They have and are holding retailers liable for non-payment
    of manufacturers rebates.

    The OP should certainly file a complaint with the FTC.
    The more complains they get, the more pressure there
    will be to end this silly rebate nonsense.



    --
    |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
    | Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
    | Gary Player. |
    | http://www.malch.com/ Shpx gur PQN. |
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Malcolm Hoar, Dec 29, 2006
    #10
  11. John

    Malcolm Hoar Guest

    A few major retail chains have already announced their
    intent to phase out all rebates. Complaining (on a large
    scale) really works.

    If you don't receive your rebate, please, please give
    the manufacturer, the retailer and the FTC, lots of
    grief and hassle. Collectively, consumers can put an
    end to this scam.


    --
    |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
    | Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
    | Gary Player. |
    | http://www.malch.com/ Shpx gur PQN. |
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Malcolm Hoar, Dec 29, 2006
    #11
  12. Ok, I consider myself to be a true rebate guru ... hundreds per year
    (although not as many as in past years now that OfficeMax and some other
    stores are cutting back on them). And I get virtually all of them.

    I've been in the situation that you describe. The fact that the issue
    is that they claim that you didn't send in a qualifying original UPC
    code, which you obviously no longer have, does not mean that all is
    lost. I have protested quite a few such situations, and they have
    always been reversed and the rebate approved. The one requirement here
    is that you have a copy of everything that you sent in, including the
    UPC label (Obviously it's not going to be the original - that's ok, the
    copy is good enough for a protest/resubmission). Protest the denial,
    and in the protest include a copy of the original rebate submission
    (with the UPC) and a copy of the delivery confirmation. Let them
    explain why they denied it.

    [Note: It could be that you sent in a bar code but not a UPC bar code;
    this happens a lot, although usually only to rebate "newbies" who don't
    know what a UPC code is. Lots of products have tons of bar code labels
    on them, only one of which is the UPC bar code label. Another
    possibility is that the UPC code on the product was not on the list of
    qualifying UPC codes supplied to the rebate processor by the rebate
    sponsor. This is OFTEN a mistake; sometimes, however, there was no
    rebate on the product that you bought, although there was one on a VERY
    similar product. Either way, this is also worth protesting and denials
    are often reversed. Note that the same product sold in different stores
    can have different UPC labels, one of which qualifies and the other of
    which does not. This is common for products sold at warehouse clubs,
    for example (a product sold at a warehouse club like Costco or Sam's
    doesn't qualify for a rebate while the exact same product sold at Best
    Buy does, and they have different UPC labels.]

    A couple of comments: MOST of the rebate firms and the rebate sponsors
    are NOT out to screw you or deny you the rebate (but yes, there are a
    few exceptions], and they are usually reasonable when an issue arises
    (again, there are exceptions). We've had quite a discussion of this
    recently in another newsgroup (Dell), and my experience is typical of
    people who do a lot of rebates. More than 90% of rebates work just fine
    with no issues if you follow the directions. A small number, less than
    10%, will involve some type of post-application correspondence.
    However, if you follow the instructions and appeal when necessary, you
    will get more than 99% of your rebates.

    Officially, is no "delivery confirmation" for envelopes (very
    unfortunately), only for packages. The official USPS policy is that you
    can only do delivery confirmation for packages or letters that are more
    than 3/4 of an inch thick. Some postal clerks, however, either don't
    know this or don't enforce it and will sell you a delivery confirmation
    anyway. [I think that this whole policy is a mistake by the postal
    service, but that's another matter].

    However, I have never found this to be an issue. Of all of the rebate
    denials that I have dealt with (a few dozen in 5 or 6 years out of at
    least 600 to 1,000 rebates), the issue has NEVER been that the rebate
    was just "lost". Not even once. Further, delivery confirmation and,
    especially a return signature, can actually slow down the process (and
    some rebate processors won't even accept rebate submissions with return
    signature cards that have to be signed for). What you can do on a
    letter is a lesser known service called a "Certificate of Mailing",
    which you can get on a letter. It proves that the letter was mailed,
    although not that it was received by the recipient. But problems with
    missing/wrong UPC labels or receipts, or non-qualification for whatever
    reason, are the bulk of problems.
     
    Barry Watzman, Dec 29, 2006
    #12
  13. But it says right on the rebate form that rebates will not be honored
    from post office boxes. This is a standard term of virually all
    rebates. Sure, you have a PO box, but normally you do live SOMEWHERE
    where you could get mail.
     
    Barry Watzman, Dec 29, 2006
    #13
  14. John

    J.A. Michel Guest

    I don't remember seeing that 'rule' in the paperwork. This was several
    years ago. So I guess everyone with a PO box is a criminal or something??
    I live in a rural area, where home-delivered mail is not an option. We have
    to have a PO box, and we get to pay box rent for the privilege of being
    treated like crap.
     
    J.A. Michel, Dec 29, 2006
    #14
  15. There have been rulings that in SOME cases, retailers are responsible
    for rebates. I'm not sure that it was a court ruling, but I believe
    that CompUSA signed an FTC consent decree on this matter. However it's
    not "across the board".

    That not withstanding, I have had both Circuit City and Best Buy local
    stores pay me for rebates that were denied (the Circuit City rebate was
    $200 on a laptop .... and they gave me cash right out of the cash
    register, after filling out some forms and having me sign some papers).
    [Interestingly, this rebate, which had been denied by the rebate
    processor, was subsequently reversed and I received my check ... double
    rebate ... which I took back to the store and signed over to them.]
    Best Buy did not give me cash, but a gift card (which, for me, was as
    good as cash).

    It's a last resort, to be used after appealing to the rebate processor,
    but if you have all of the documentation, the local stores will indeed
    sometimes honor a rebate that the rebate processor denies.
     
    Barry Watzman, Dec 29, 2006
    #15
  16. John

    Freckles Guest

    I have put in for many rebates over the years and I have always received
    them.
     
    Freckles, Dec 29, 2006
    #16
  17. No, everyone with a PO box is not a criminal, but most of the scams
    against rebate fulfillment houses and sponsors involve use of PO boxes.
    So quite some time ago (I'd say more than a decade ago) it became just
    about universal to deny rebates with a PO box address (and it states
    that in the rebate terms).

    An interesting situation arose about 2 years ago because almost all
    rebates are limited to "one per address". The NY attorney general
    brought suit against a ton of rebate firms for not paying rebates to
    residents of large NYC high-rise apartment buildings (same address .....
    1234 Broadway, NY, NY). Sometimes some of the things that the rebate
    firms have to do to protect themselves (because they ARE themselves the
    targets of people who would commit fraud) cross the line, sometimes
    unintentionally. The "one per address" rule is reasonable enough in a
    suburban single-family residence environment, but failed miserably in
    environments with high-rise apartment buildings that have a single address.
     
    Barry Watzman, Dec 29, 2006
    #17
  18. John

    Tony Hwang Guest

    Hmmm,
    I always got my rebate check. Only thing is it takes upto a few weeks to
    get it. Follow the procedure and mail it and be paitient.
     
    Tony Hwang, Dec 29, 2006
    #18
  19. John

    Tony Hwang Guest

    Hmmm,
    You may have bought a grey market product? Take it up with your retailer.
     
    Tony Hwang, Dec 29, 2006
    #19
  20. John

    Malcolm Hoar Guest

    The 10-20% of rebates that are never submitted work fine (for
    the issuer).

    In my opinion, none of them work "just fine" for the consumer.
    The paperwork is a hassle. Postage is not free. Keeping copies
    is even more of a hassle. And chasing non-payments is a major
    hassle.

    On top of all that, in CA at least, you pay sales tax on the
    rebate amount.

    The only reason rebates exist is because the issues know with
    a high degree of confidence that they'll get to keep some
    20% of refundable amount. Large manufacturers and retailers
    can play that numbers game to their advantage. Consumers, as
    a group, will always loose.


    --
    |~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
    | Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
    | Gary Player. |
    | http://www.malch.com/ Shpx gur PQN. |
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Malcolm Hoar, Dec 29, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.