[Semi-Off-Topic] In search of techniques

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Al Denelsbeck, Jul 20, 2004.

  1. Okay, I'm a big fan of experimenting with the camera, finding out
    what can be done with unusual techniques, lighting tricks, and stuff along
    those lines.

    Came across this one the other day, as an excellent example of a
    simple technique used in a creative way:
    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap040708.html

    So this is sparking my creativity. Right at the moment, I'm trying to
    think of a way to take an exposure where the aperture is changed partway
    through and thus the changing depth-of-field becomes visible - maybe
    through multiple exposures, maybe through variable lighting... I haven't
    really determined how yet.

    Anyone else have any ideas they want to contribute? Any method
    they've tried, *wanted* to try, suspect might work, whatever? I figure
    there's gotta be a few new artistic approaches out there. Right?


    - Al.
     
    Al Denelsbeck, Jul 20, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Al Denelsbeck

    Joseph Kewfi Guest

    I'm trying to think of a way to take an exposure where the aperture is
    changed partway through and thus the changing depth-of-field becomes
    visible - maybe through multiple exposures, maybe through variable
    lighting... I haven't really determined how yet.

    With a cable release attached to the camera put the camera into "B" mode,
    trigger the shutter - now in your own time alter the aperture using the ring
    on the lens, y'know the one with the numbers on it ;-]
     
    Joseph Kewfi, Jul 20, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Al Denelsbeck

    Peter Irwin Guest

    One related thing you might try is to use a Waterhouse stop with
    two spaced holes. If you don't have a lens you can take apart,
    you can fit the stop right behind the lens. This will give you
    a double image for those parts of the image which would be
    out of focus with a single large stop.

    Peter.
     
    Peter Irwin, Jul 20, 2004
    #3

  4. :) Well, okay, let me explain this one a little better then. I know
    *how* to do it, what I'm struggling with is the subject/approach to make it
    *obvious* that it has been done ;-)

    Right at the moment, I'm dwelling on taking a shot while aimed at the
    corner of a building, the walls extending deeper into the frame on either
    side. Taken at night in total darkness, light one side with the strobe at
    f2.8, then stop down to f22 or so and light the other side with the strobe
    (several times, or scramble around with distances to keep the lighting
    even). What should result is an evenly lit photo showing split depth-of-
    field. Done properly, anyway.

    The problem is, that's boring, so I'm still thinking about it.

    But okay, that's my secret revealed, that everyone would credit to
    Photoshop anyway ;-). But who else has something to offer along the lines
    of technique?

    Like Tony Spadaro says above in the thread about clichés, instead of
    dragging the shutter for moving water shots, taking a multiple exposure at
    high speeds instead (done that - works only for very violent water).

    I've seen Harris Shutters, and won't attempt to explain them here -
    do a Google search, pictures help. Never tried it, because I see it as a
    serious hassle to make. But I bounced a white marble off of a tabletop
    three times under strobes with red, yellow, and blue gels, while another
    was fixed to the tabletop for all three exposures. Not bad - one marble of
    each color in midair, one white one (kinda, my gels weren't perfect)
    motionless.

    So c'mon, who has some kind of creative technique kicking around?


    - Al.
     
    Al Denelsbeck, Jul 20, 2004
    #4
  5. Al Denelsbeck

    Sander Vesik Guest

    And how does that work in any exposure shorter than say 2 seconds?
     
    Sander Vesik, Jul 20, 2004
    #5
  6. Al Denelsbeck

    Magnus W Guest

    Yes, but we are keeping them to ourselves! ;-)

    On the subject of multiple exposures, the Dynax 7 has a special multi
    exposure mode which meters the scene and then takes seven exposures on one
    frame, with correct final exposure, but stepping down the aperture between
    each of the exposures. The thinking behind this is to create better bokeh,
    simulating the effect of their esoteric 135 STF lens (and the camera
    setting is indeed called the "STF" mode). However, this can be used with
    great results for moving objects, either stationary or panning. The camera
    fires at 4fps so it takes about two seconds.

    However, this effect is somewhat hard to recreate with any camera but the
    Dynax 7.
     
    Magnus W, Jul 21, 2004
    #6
  7. Al Denelsbeck

    Bandicoot Guest

    How about a still life of some sort. Use a small aperture with the key
    light (may need several pops) and then a large aperture with the fill.
    Should give you shadows that are sharp at the plane of focus but sot
    everywhere else, whilst the highlights remain (comparatively) sharp
    throughout. Seems to me like the most likely 'aesthetic' use of the
    technique. Could do it the other way round too, to soften the highlights
    instead.


    Peter
     
    Bandicoot, Jul 22, 2004
    #7
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.