Sensor cleaning - Nikon D70s

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by AlanW, Jan 4, 2008.

  1. AlanW

    AlanW Guest

    Hello Everyone,

    I finally was a victim to a big blob of dust on all of the photos I
    took recently. (All were repaired in Photoshop Elements 5).
    Fortunately, I was able to fix the problem in the field by "blowing"
    on the sensor which dislodged the offending dust particle. I now plan
    to invest in a Giotto Rocket Blowerfor the future. My question is: "Is
    there a preferred sensor cleanig kit for the Nikon D70s?" Also, how
    often should the sensor be cleaned? Any recommendations or comments
    will be appreciated.

    Many Thanks,
    Alan
     
    AlanW, Jan 4, 2008
    #1
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  2. AlanW

    acl Guest

    Hi,
    I can't really recommend anything, but what I do is to use a blower (a
    cheapo one, bought several years ago) on the sensor once every couple
    of weeks-a month on my d200 preemptively. I've never needed to do
    anything more serious. Mind you, for the first year I used the camera,
    I only did that when I saw dust spots; still no problems. I change
    lenses quite often (at least once a day, often outside).

    However, there may be a dependence on humidity etc.
     
    acl, Jan 4, 2008
    #2
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  3. AlanW

    Wilba Guest

    I can't vouch for what this guy says, but he anwers all your questions -
    http://www.bythom.com/cleaning.htm.
     
    Wilba, Jan 4, 2008
    #3
  4. Giotto it much safer than just blowing yourself on sensor as you do not want
    to risk getting spit on sensor!

    Anything the Giotto won't shift with a few puffs can be got off using a
    "wet" method such as the popular copperhill method. (sensor wand or sensor
    swipe, with pec pads & eclipse).
     
    Adrian Boliston, Jan 4, 2008
    #4
  5. My first try is with a Giottos Roacket Blower. If the dust is a bit
    stubborn and won't come off then I use a sensor brush. The Visibledust
    sensor brushes are simply overpriced nylon brushes. Actually, overpriced is
    putting it mildly. I bought a 100% nylon makeup brush and cleaned it with
    some mild detergent and water then let it dry overnight. Give the brush a
    blast of compressed air to give it a static charge and then gently wipe
    across the sensor. Works great. BTW, to check for dust, take a shot at the
    sky or a light colored wall at f22 (or as high an f-stop setting you can).
    Any dust will show up.
     
    Peter Stavrakoglou, Jan 4, 2008
    #5
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