Sensor Film (for cleaning sensor)

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Paul Furman, Apr 10, 2010.

  1. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Paul Furman, Apr 10, 2010
    #1
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  2. Paul Furman

    Bruce Guest


    Thanks for this, Paul.

    I agree, it looks very good indeed. I used something very similar for
    cleaning lens surfaces and - if used with care - it was excellent.

    My Kodak DCS Pro 14n has acquired a large blob of dust on the sensor
    so, rather than pay $$ for professional cleaning, I have ordered one
    of these cleaning kits.

    I will try it, and report back.
     
    Bruce, Apr 10, 2010
    #2
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  3. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Cool, yes, let us know. I'll bet blue painter's masking tape works well.
    I've used that to protect lenses while machining/grinding and it always
    comes off perfectly clean.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Apr 10, 2010
    #3
  4. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Yeah, that's what the second dab on the paper is for, so the pull tab
    doesn't get thwacked by the mirror if the battery fails. Keeping the
    mirror locked for 3 hours to dry sounds kind of crazy though.

    I'm going to try masking tape. Swabs drive me nuts.
    Yep, I found this idea in a discussion of that idea.


    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Apr 11, 2010
    #4
  5. Paul Furman

    Bruce Guest


    Be careful, because the sheet of glass that you are cleaning (the
    infra red filter) is very thin and might break if the masking tape is
    stuck hard to it.
     
    Bruce, Apr 11, 2010
    #5
  6. Paul Furman

    Bruce Guest


    It was widely available in the UK. Or at least a similar product was,
    because I don't recall it being made by 3M.
     
    Bruce, Apr 11, 2010
    #6
  7. This one (Dust-Aid) looked really easy to use --
    .
    Has anyone tried it?
    --DR
     
    David Ruether, Apr 11, 2010
    #7
  8. Paul Furman

    C.P. Robbins Guest

    All of which induce an even stronger electrostatic charge on the substrate
    as it is peeled off, making it an even greater dust magnet afterward. (This
    method of optics cleaning is nothing new by the way. Collodion methods have
    been used for centuries. Goggle: optics cleaning collodion) 3M has done a
    lot in their adhesives research to try to prevent inducing a static charge
    between adhesive and the foundations to which they are applied and removed,
    but a completely neutral substance to the triboelectric scale is wholly
    impossible. I recently had to research this when trying to find a good belt
    material for a many-megavolt electrostatic generator--considering even some
    of 3M's adhesive tapes for the purpose (adhesive removed, of course). Their
    formulations for adhesives will bleed off a charge while they are in place,
    but they can do little about the problem when the two different layers are
    pulled away from each other. They are non-electrostatic inducing while
    applied but not when separated.

    My photography work-flow is free and clear of all these image and
    opportunity destroying problems. I only buy cameras without all these
    encumbrances.
     
    C.P. Robbins, Apr 11, 2010
    #8
  9. Paul Furman

    John A. Guest

    I find my windshield is at its cleanest after I chip ice off it. Maybe
    a drop of water and a little liquid nitrogen would do the trick
    without introducing static. ;)
     
    John A., Apr 11, 2010
    #9
  10. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    The post-peel static issue could be tested easily on any piece of glass.
    I wouldn't take the troll's word for it. If it's a problem, savageduck's
    kinetronics link above has all sorts of static controlling products.
    http://www.kinetronics.com/store/photoproducts.html
    I like the idea of giving the whole mirror box a good cleaning while the
    sensor is painted over. It's not clear to me how all those anti-static
    products work, the speck-grabber seems like a little swab of microfiber
    cloth but how do you clean it after using? I'm inclined to buy a pack of
    microfiber cloth at the drug store, cut it into smaller pieces and use
    those as disposable mirror box wipes. For the brushes, I'd need some
    sort of breathable bag to dry them in after washing or more dust would
    just settle in from the air as they dry :-(

    Plus those anti-static cleaning brushes use static charge to attract the
    dust, but how could that eliminate static on the glass?

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Apr 11, 2010
    #10
  11. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Looks good. Their faq has some caveats:
    http://www.dust-aid.com/08faq.html
    -which is a reminder that probably even with the paint-on stuff, you'd
    need a wet cleaning once in a while. Or at least I would <g>.

    I'm thinking the problem with my masking tape idea is getting it pressed
    down firmly, that stuff is kind of wrinkly and might miss spots. I'll
    try it and report back when I get the nerve.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, Apr 11, 2010
    #11
  12. Paul Furman

    C.P. Robbins Guest

    That wouldn't work, you effin' moron. Because even a one-atom thick layer
    of AR coating would change the results. As would even the glass composition
    itself if there were no AR layer at all. Soda-glass is on a completely
    different place on the triboelectric scale than flint-glass, as is Pyrex
    glass or any other glass you care to name. Yes, you can rub two pieces of
    glass together to induce a static charge in them both, if they are two
    different varieties of glass. You can even pull two piece of the same glass
    away from each other and induce a charge in them both if one of them is
    backed by a dissimilarly charged substance (i.e. air vs. anything). A
    Wimshurst electrostatic generator even works on this principle. The initial
    charge started just due to the random variances in electric charges in the
    air itself around the Wimshurst machine's plates. So even if both pieces of
    glass are surrounded by the same air, pulling them away from each other can
    induce a charge. The Wimshurst machine is just a very effective
    amplifier/multiplier of this effect.

    You can only test this principle on the sensor on which it is used and if
    all are using the very same collodion composition in the exact same
    environment as everyone else. Since no two sensor designs will have the
    exact same AR coating, AR coating layer thicknesses, nor compositions then
    your results would be null and void when compared to anyone else's sensors.
    For an example of how a one-molecule thick layer can affect things, on some
    of 3M's tapes a molecule thick layer is applied to the outside surface to
    bleed off a static charge (after the fact). If that is rubbed off then the
    tape can be used to induce and hold a charge indefinitely.

    Go back to trolling on topics for which you also don't have a clue, but
    where your ignorance is much more easily noticed by all others. That way I
    don't have to waste my time in correcting you so often. You'll reveal
    yourself to be the ignorant fool that you are to everyone and then there's
    no need for correction.
     
    C.P. Robbins, Apr 11, 2010
    #12
  13. Paul Furman

    Paul Furman Guest

    Yes I'm sure it's all impossible and hopeless and nothing works.
    Very helpful.
     
    Paul Furman, Apr 11, 2010
    #13
  14. Paul Furman

    Bruce Guest


    That's very interesting, thank you.


    Please explain?
     
    Bruce, Apr 11, 2010
    #14
  15. David Ruether, Apr 11, 2010
    #15
  16. Paul Furman

    Bruce Guest


    I apologise. I thought the first part of his reply was interesting
    and quite helpful so I didn't suspect it was the troll. Perhaps it
    shows that, if he could stop his repetitive ranting, he might actually
    have something useful to say.
     
    Bruce, Apr 12, 2010
    #16
  17. Paul Furman

    John A. Guest

    I've been known to use post-its to clean my monitor in a pinch. I
    wonder how they'd do on a sensor for a quick in-the-field attempt at a
    new but stubborn speck.
     
    John A., Apr 12, 2010
    #17
  18. Paul Furman

    John A. Guest

    A bit OT, but this reminds me of an article I read not long ago about
    the discovery that peeling tape off in a vacuum generates x-rays.
    IIRC, it was hoped that maybe someday it could be the basis of a
    manually-powered single-use field x-ray for paramedics and military
    units.
     
    John A., Apr 12, 2010
    #18
  19. Paul Furman

    C.P. Robbins Guest

    What you fail to realize is that those who call others a troll are they
    themselves the penultimate troll.


    There are a plethora of camera designs that are bereft of this unending
    sensor cleaning problem.

    Leave it to the real trolls to explain likewise.
     
    C.P. Robbins, Apr 12, 2010
    #19
  20. Paul Furman

    stephe_k Guest


    I laugh about this topic every time it comes up. I've been using
    digi-cams for many years and have never had to bother with cleaning a
    sensor on any I own, but have seen the effects of sensor dust when I
    have tried out other people's. But if you mention these models that
    don't have this issue, the crowd here goes nuts about what a POS they are.

    Stephanie
     
    stephe_k, Apr 12, 2010
    #20
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