Setting brightness/Black-point

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Paul Busby, Mar 27, 2005.

  1. Paul Busby

    Paul Busby Guest

    Hi

    I've just tried setting the brightness up on my iiyama 413 monitor using the
    instructions on AIM:
    http://www.aim-dtp.net/aim/
    Unless I'm misreading the instructions given, I get a far too dark a picture
    where shadow detail is lost. The problem seems to be the advice to set the
    blackpoint to virtually pure black as contrasted against the monitor's
    surrounding mask. I contend that my monitor & no doubt most others just
    don't have the brightness range to use this method!

    If I use the Gamma chart method that appears to be the standard, the
    black-point gets set much higher which results in a solely black screen
    being slightly grey looking. As soon as other brightness levels are viewed
    such as photographs or a normal desktop the eye/brain renders these less
    than black areas as black.

    Unfortunately, I've come unstuck in the past with these settings. I can
    remember checking my colour temp was set to 6500k late one night. The next
    morning, I thought my monitor looked a bit dim but forgot about it. I
    preceded to edit some photos & thought at the back of my mind that something
    seemed different but beyond being able to pin it down. When I compared
    pictures previewed on my Olympus C4040, they seemed far punchier than when
    viewed on my monitor. The penny eventually dropped when I rechecked the
    brightness settings on my monitor - resetting the colour temp from 6500 (it
    was already correct) to 6500 also resets the brightness to the default 50%
    instead of ~74% that I'd previously set it to.

    The moral here is to not necessarily to believe what you read on certain
    sites & to be aware of how your monitor controls interact with each other. I
    now tend to check both white & black parts of an important image being
    edited by reading their respective values - very handy when ambient light
    levels are high such as during a sunny day.
     
    Paul Busby, Mar 27, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Paul Busby wrote:
    []
    I recommend the chart at the top of:

    http://www.jasc.com/support/kb/articles/monitor.asp

    and not making any attempt at setting the gamma. This is under Windows.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Mar 27, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Paul Busby

    Paul Busby Guest

    Thus spake David J Taylor:
    I recommend it too. My Gamma comes out at 2.60 - very slightly higher than
    recommended. The AIM method results in high shadow detail compression. If
    using the Gamma method:
    http://www.normankoren.com/makingfineprints1A.html#Monitor_test_pattern
    seems to be comprehensive.
     
    Paul Busby, Mar 27, 2005
    #3
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.