sharp focus

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by oneThousand, Aug 16, 2003.

  1. oneThousand

    oneThousand Guest

    Folks,

    I have been having a problem w/sharp portraits.
    Any recommendation on my technique?

    I often use a Nikkor 28-105mm f/3.5-4.5

    I also have a Nikkor 85mm fixed at f/1.8, should I be using this instead for
    less sharpness?

    Any other recommendations on technique would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks!
    one.
     
    oneThousand, Aug 16, 2003
    #1
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  2. The latter is a very sharp lens. If your problem is to get soft
    portraits, maybe a high quality diffusion filter is very helpful.
     
    Silvio Bacchetta, Aug 16, 2003
    #2
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  3. oneThousand

    Ken Cashion Guest

    To experiment easily, tape a single ply of sheer panty hose
    over the lens.
    Try two layers...I did this for young men with bad
    complexions. (I had the hose mounted in a polaroid mount and could
    turn one slightly for a little control.)
    If you are doing your own printing, consider going for the
    sharp negative and using a diffusor on the enlarger. This will give a
    little different result.
    One way may give a glowing-skin aspect to the print.
    The other way the reverse. This is less attractive for
    females but I found it good for a grizzled old man with rough hands
    and dark background.
    If you put a diffusor on the camera and on the enlarger as
    well, it puts everything back like it was. (No! I am just joking!
    Just joking!!!)
    Play.

    Ken Cashion
     
    Ken Cashion, Aug 16, 2003
    #3
  4. There are soft focus filters that would solve your problem admirably, or you
    can take a cheap throw away UV filter and either smear vasoline on it, or
    stretch a piece of nylon stocking over it to achieve a similar effect.
     
    Skip Middleton, Aug 16, 2003
    #4
  5. oneThousand

    Don Stauffer Guest

    Actually, many portrait photographers LIKE a softer lens :)

    Anyway, you did not mention if you were using a tripod. Are you? Even
    85 mm is long enough you probably should be.
     
    Don Stauffer, Aug 16, 2003
    #5
  6. oneThousand

    oneThousand Guest

    Thanks folks!
    These comments are great!!!
    I think I will try a soft focus or diffusion filter (is there a difference?)
    Can anyone recommend any high quality ones (with experience using it... not
    reading an article :) )

    Don,

    As for the tripod I seldom use one as my shutter speed permits hand holding.
    Besides, I also do fashion and 'active' shooting which makes a tripod
    difficult to use at times.

    Thanks a mill.!
    one.
     
    oneThousand, Aug 16, 2003
    #6
  7. Yes, there is.
    Softars are by far the best.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Aug 16, 2003
    #7
  8. oneThousand

    Polytone Guest

    pantyhose? clean or worn?


     
    Polytone, Aug 17, 2003
    #8
  9. oneThousand

    snaps! Guest

    The filter you need is called Duto. It softens the lines in people's faces.
    Hoya make a good one. Smearing anything on a lens is totally unpredictable.
    Sometimes I huff on the lens but this too is unpredictable. Using a stocking
    is overkill and will not result in soft portraits... More like murkey ones.

    Doug
     
    snaps!, Aug 17, 2003
    #9
  10. (Thud![sound of forehead hitting desk!]) It would depend entirely on your
    source, I'd think...
     
    Skip Middleton, Aug 17, 2003
    #10
  11. Ideally, you ask the model to borrow hers........
     
    William Graham, Aug 18, 2003
    #11
  12. oneThousand

    Gordon Moat Guest

    I nominate Polytone's question for "Question Of The Month". He should be
    awarded an expired roll of Kodak Gold for that one!

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    Alliance Graphique Studio
    <http://www.allgstudio.com>
     
    Gordon Moat, Aug 18, 2003
    #12
  13. heheheh

    --
    Skip Middleton
    www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
     
    Skip Middleton, Aug 18, 2003
    #13
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