Shoulder Strap for DSLR???? Non-slip!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by infiniteMPG, Apr 27, 2009.

  1. infiniteMPG

    infiniteMPG Guest

    I have a Sony Alpha A100 and my standard lens is my Tamron AF
    18-250/3.5-6.3 DI II Macro Lens. The stock strap that came with the
    A100 is narrow, pretty slippery and not the most comfortable of straps
    on my shoulder all day. Was looking at some different straps like the
    Lowpro "Speedster" but wanted to see what shoulder straps people would
    recommend for the A100.

    Also, with the Tamron 18-250 attached, the lens tries to pull the
    camera down but the strap clip locations are on the top back edge of
    the body, so the camera sits kinda hangs half-way between horizontal
    and vertical. Would much prefer the camera to hang from my shoulder
    with the lens straight down but don't think this would happen without
    duct-taping a brick to the end of my lens. Anyone have any secret
    ways to shoulder carry a camera like this and not have it sticking out
    banging your arm while you hike?

    Thanks/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
     
    infiniteMPG, Apr 27, 2009
    #1
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  2. infiniteMPG

    Pete D Guest

    I use a neoprene strap from LowePro, simply brilliant.
     
    Pete D, Apr 27, 2009
    #2
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  3. infiniteMPG

    DRS Guest

    I've been happily using Optech (OP/TECH) straps for many years.
    http://optechusa.com/category/second/?CATEGORY_ID=4
     
    DRS, Apr 27, 2009
    #3
  4. infiniteMPG

    me Guest

    Let it hang with the top of the camera facing towards, not away from
    the body. You might also consider letting out the strap so the camera
    ends up off your hip. This is how I've carried a D70/200/300 with the
    70-200mm f/2.8 for years. I now use the detachable LowePro strap which
    allows for quick removal when I mount the 200-400 f/4 and use it's
    strap instead.
     
    me, Apr 27, 2009
    #4
  5. I have detested camera shoulder straps since I began photographing
    almost a half century ago. I could never figure out why anyone
    would tolerate a noticeably heavy odd-shaped object bobbling
    against themselves, especially if suspended by a strap insecurely
    not placed over the head, but somehow balanced on a shoulder.
    A real mystery.....;-) My solution has always been to place the
    camera (with a shoelace wrist strap) and attached lens in a bag
    with easy access (with the top left unlocked when shooting). I add
    a wide pad to the strap at the area of contact. I have never felt that
    I have "missed a shot" as a result of doing this, and when it is time
    to quit shooting, the gear is essentially "prepacked" in a case that
    also holds an additional lens plus whatever other minor items may
    be needed for the day.
    --DR
     
    David Ruether, Apr 27, 2009
    #5
  6. infiniteMPG

    infiniteMPG Guest

    My solution has always been to place the camera (with a shoelace wrist strap) and attached lens in a bag with easy access (with the top left unlocked when shooting).

    Always open to suggestions so could you expand on your suggestion and
    tell me what kind of "bag" you're referring to? A backpack kind of
    bag or a waist pack kind of bag? Often when I am walking I also have
    on either my Camelbak M.U.L.E. or a fully loaded gear back pack. I
    also have hunting knife, GPS, PDA (we geocache a lot) and other items
    hanging from my belt. Can't put the camera over my neck as it would
    be whacking me in the chest constantly. If it was smaller then that
    would be an option, but a full sized DSLR with zoom lens is a load to
    have bouncing.

    I like the idea of a pack as we're in Florida so the sun becomes an
    issue baking an exposed camera so the "bag" idea caught my attention.

    And thanks to all for the strap suggestions, will most definitely shop
    around before I buy.
     
    infiniteMPG, Apr 27, 2009
    #6
  7. If you hike in rough enough places that you sometimes stumble and
    possibly fall, you may find it much cheaper in the long run to carry
    your camera in a well padded quick access bag.

    Do you sometimes hike to the summit of a craggy mountain? Popular
    spots for photography. If so, are you as familiar as I am with the
    toe-curling sound of someone's DSLR bouncing off a rock? :)
     
    Chris Malcolm, Apr 28, 2009
    #7
  8. infiniteMPG

    infiniteMPG Guest

    If you hike in rough enough places that you sometimes stumble and possibly fall, you may find it much cheaper in the long run to carry your camera in a well padded quick access bag.

    Guess I need to look up "quick access bags" as I am familiar with
    waist packs, back packs and straps but not that. Any examples/links?
    I've hiked to the summit of every mountain I could find in west
    central Florida, and almost made it to 100-feet in altitude
    once! :O) I know that sound, though. When I had my DiMAGE Z3 I
    picked up my little Tamrac backpack and felt something hit the back of
    my foot. Looked down to see my USB cable laying on the ground...
    which was the same amount of time it took to register that I forgot to
    zip my bag up.... which was all the time my Z3 needed to jump to it's
    freedom onto the concrete and smash into a dozen pieces. Thanks to
    SuperGlue, JB Weld, hot melt glue and some cut pieces of bicycle inner
    tube it still works. You would think after dunking it to the bottom
    of the Little Manatee River I would of learned (no, the Z3 is not
    waterproof... trust me) :O)

    Here the biggest fear is dropping the camera in the sand, once that
    happens nothing works right so the "quick access" needs to be balance
    with "secure hold".

    Thanks!
     
    infiniteMPG, Apr 28, 2009
    #8
  9. infiniteMPG

    Bruce Guest


    Pretty good list! My priorities would be much the same, although I have
    never seen them expressed quite so precisely. ;-)

    The nearest I have found to the perfect strap - one that satisfies all
    of the above requirements when used with a medium weight DSLR and lenses
    up to 70-200mm f/2.8 zoom - is the Super Classic Strap from Op/Tech.

    http://optechusa.com/product/detail/?PRODUCT_ID=45

    I cannot fault its comfort, and it wears well too. It's worth comparing
    prices for Op/Tech as I have noted a large variation between stores.
     
    Bruce, Apr 28, 2009
    #9
  10. infiniteMPG

    Lloyd W. Guest


    I've been using an RS-4 strap from Blackrapid.com and have been very
    satisified w/ it. I do mostly event and sport shooting with a long lens.
    I'm not a shill for blackrapid, just a satisfied user.

    Rob
     
    Lloyd W., Apr 28, 2009
    #10
  11. A canvas bag of an appropriate size and proportion to hold what you
    want (NOT everything you own! ;-) with quick and convenient access
    to anything you want works well for me...
    The conditions above preclude use of a backpack or "stuffed" waist
    bag. Take only what you want for the day - it generally doesn't really
    need to be much (at least for me). Limit yourself to one or two lenses
    with one body, and you may be happier walking/hiking...
    Yikes! ;-)
    YIKES! But, what about the "kitchen sink"...? 8^)
    I have n-e-v-e-r tolerated the "bouncing camera" feeling - and it it
    a good way to get it damaged, or at least very dirty/dusty.
    Yes - and it also can protect things from sudden rain if a thin plastic
    bag is tucked somewhere in the bag (BTW, do avoid those fake
    "leather" bags - they are water-sponges, being FAR from waterproof).
    Think about what you want - it took a LONG time for the general
    camera-toting population to get past those "never-ready" leather camera
    cases and "vault-like" gigantic heavy leather camera bags that were once
    so popular. I dropped the "camera on a dangling-get-in-the-way" shoulder
    strap with those terrible "quick release" clips many decades ago in favor
    of a simple/cheap/better shoestring wrist strap plus small side bag to drop
    the camera into or grab it from. But, whatever...8^)
    --DR
     
    David Ruether, May 1, 2009
    #11
  12. infiniteMPG

    frank Guest

    I'd think you'd want one of those holster type camera bags, one lens
    on the body, somewhat padded.Lowepro makes them. In the environment
    you're talking about, regular just non padded bags wouldn't be a good
    idea. There are probably others 3rd party. You might want to look at
    REI and see what they have even if its NOT a camera bag.
     
    frank, May 2, 2009
    #12
  13. I'd think you'd want one of those holster type camera bags, one lens
    on the body, somewhat padded.Lowepro makes them.

    -- That could work, but I would want quick access, without the
    -- possibility of the camera slipping out if I sat down...

    In the environment you're talking about, regular just non padded bags wouldn't
    be a good idea.

    -- I agree. All of my many bags (for different gear choices) are
    -- padded except my very small travel-kit bag, which can hold a
    -- Nikon FA with folding handle, 85mm f2 MF (tiny), 35mm f2 MF
    -- (same size), 20mm f2.8 MF (smaller yet), and sometimes the
    -- compact 16mm f3.5 - plus 20 36-exposure rolls of film (I will not
    -- claim that this bag is convenient in use, but it does hold an amazing
    -- amount of gear in an amazingly small package, making plane travel
    -- more pleasant - and at the destination, the bag can be partially
    -- unloaded, with a couple of items left out, if desired). If I ever switch
    -- to digital for travel, I will need to rethink the kit, of course...;-)

    There are probably others 3rd party. You might want to look at
    REI and see what they have even if its NOT a camera bag.

    -- My first bags were army surplus gas mask bags...;-) I have also
    -- used coolers with typewriter/large-mouse-pads for separators for
    -- carrying camcorders.
    -- DR
     
    David Ruether, May 2, 2009
    #13
  14. infiniteMPG

    Paul Furman Guest

    Well, I mocked up something like that with string and didn't like it.


    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
    www.baynatives.com

    all google groups messages filtered due to spam
     
    Paul Furman, May 10, 2009
    #14
  15. infiniteMPG

    Bob Roberts Guest

    These folks sell what you want:
    http://www.upstrap-pro.com/
     
    Bob Roberts, May 10, 2009
    #15
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