SI Mandate suggestion

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Tony Cooper, Mar 16, 2013.

  1. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    How about "furniture"? Regardless of the weather, there's chairs and
    tables and sofas and beds around. It can be "indoor furniture" or
    "outdoor furniture" or just "furniture".
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 16, 2013
    #1
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  2. Tony Cooper

    Bowser Guest

    Sounds fine. I think I'll use a two-up for the next two mandates so
    the more difficult of the two can be shot over a two month period.
     
    Bowser, Mar 16, 2013
    #2
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  3. Tony Cooper

    Rob Guest


    Count me out of that one. That's not a challenge.
     
    Rob, Mar 16, 2013
    #3
  4. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    You must be very, very, good if any subject is not a challenge. It's
    no challenge to *find* furniture, it's no challenge to *photograph*
    furniture, but it is a challenge to come up with an interesting
    photograph of furniture.

    It's not the subject, but how the photographer sees the subject and
    what the photographer does with the subject that makes it a challenge.

    Here's one I shot six days ago:

    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/64147677/2013-03-10-100.jpg

    I'm sure you can do better. Let's see one.
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 17, 2013
    #4
  5. Tony Cooper

    Rob Guest

    May have the bright eye catching colours, but still this does not appeal
    to me, its a personal thing.
     
    Rob, Mar 17, 2013
    #5
  6. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    The funny thing is that we've been doing these "letter" mandates and
    no one has said they are not a challenge. Actually, they are less of
    a challenge than a specific object.

    I could submit this image and meet

    B = Blue Wall
    R = Red bench
    C = Chair
    P = Porch
    F = Furniture
    A = Aqua Chair

    and maybe some other letters.
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 17, 2013
    #6
  7. Tony Cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On 17/03/2013 11:32 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
    : >
    : >> On 17/03/2013 6:54 AM, Bowser wrote:
    : >>> On Sat, 16 Mar 2013 11:24:27 -0400, Tony Cooper
    : >>>
    : >>>> How about "furniture"? Regardless of the weather, there's chairs and
    : >>>> tables and sofas and beds around. It can be "indoor furniture" or
    : >>>> "outdoor furniture" or just "furniture".
    : >>>
    : >>> Sounds fine. I think I'll use a two-up for the next two mandates so
    : >>> the more difficult of the two can be shot over a two month period.
    : >>>
    : >>
    : >>
    : >> Count me out of that one. That's not a challenge.
    : >
    : > You must be very, very, good if any subject is not a challenge. It's
    : > no challenge to *find* furniture, it's no challenge to *photograph*
    : > furniture, but it is a challenge to come up with an interesting
    : > photograph of furniture.
    : >
    : > It's not the subject, but how the photographer sees the subject and
    : > what the photographer does with the subject that makes it a challenge.
    : >
    : > Here's one I shot six days ago:
    : >
    : > http://dl.dropbox.com/u/64147677/2013-03-10-100.jpg
    : >
    : > I'm sure you can do better. Let's see one.
    : >
    :
    : May have the bright eye catching colours, but still this does not appeal
    : to me, its a personal thing.

    I liked it. The cat is what makes it work.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 17, 2013
    #7
  8. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    That's kinda what I meant when I said that the challenge is what the
    photographer does with the subject. I shot several frames of this
    furniture grouping. Just as I was about to move on, the cat came into
    the scene. From the series, I selected this one because the cat added
    an element. I would like the cat to have been looking to the left
    into the frame, but cats resist being told how to pose.
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 17, 2013
    #8
  9. Tony Cooper

    Eric Stevens Guest


    Garn!

    That's not a shot of furniture.

    It's a shot with furniture in it.
     
    Eric Stevens, Mar 17, 2013
    #9
  10. Tony Cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : >: On 17/03/2013 11:32 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
    : >: >
    : >: >> On 17/03/2013 6:54 AM, Bowser wrote:
    : >: >>> On Sat, 16 Mar 2013 11:24:27 -0400, Tony Cooper
    : >: >>>
    : >: >>>> How about "furniture"? Regardless of the weather, there's chairs and
    : >: >>>> tables and sofas and beds around. It can be "indoor furniture" or
    : >: >>>> "outdoor furniture" or just "furniture".
    : >: >>>
    : >: >>> Sounds fine. I think I'll use a two-up for the next two mandates so
    : >: >>> the more difficult of the two can be shot over a two month period.
    : >: >>>
    : >: >>
    : >: >>
    : >: >> Count me out of that one. That's not a challenge.
    : >: >
    : >: > You must be very, very, good if any subject is not a challenge. It's
    : >: > no challenge to *find* furniture, it's no challenge to *photograph*
    : >: > furniture, but it is a challenge to come up with an interesting
    : >: > photograph of furniture.
    : >: >
    : >: > It's not the subject, but how the photographer sees the subject and
    : >: > what the photographer does with the subject that makes it a challenge.
    : >: >
    : >: > Here's one I shot six days ago:
    : >: >
    : >: > http://dl.dropbox.com/u/64147677/2013-03-10-100.jpg
    : >: >
    : >: > I'm sure you can do better. Let's see one.
    : >: >
    : >:
    : >: May have the bright eye catching colours, but still this does not appeal
    : >: to me, its a personal thing.
    : >
    : >I liked it. The cat is what makes it work.
    :
    : That's kinda what I meant when I said that the challenge is what the
    : photographer does with the subject. I shot several frames of this
    : furniture grouping. Just as I was about to move on, the cat came into
    : the scene. From the series, I selected this one because the cat added
    : an element. I would like the cat to have been looking to the left
    : into the frame, but cats resist being told how to pose.

    No, I like the direction the cat is facing. You get a good look at his eyes.
    If he were facing the sun, he'd probably be squinting. Also, it emphasizes his
    lack of interest in the project, which is clearly real. (Alternatively, he
    could be seen as glowering at a little kid approaching with an ice cream cone,
    ready to spill it on the bench.) Incidentally, the cat needed to be solid
    black or solid white. If he were any other color, you'd have had to
    Photoshoppe him black.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 17, 2013
    #10
  11. [furniture]
    Nice cat, but I can't see detail in most of the fur.
    Additionally, shouldn't the cat at least lounge on the
    furniture? Or on that bird?

    :)

    -Wolf'SCNR'gang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Mar 17, 2013
    #11
  12. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I am not a cat person, and no idea how one goes about posing a cat.
    This is a feral cat that lives on the museum grounds and is a quite
    independent creature. I feel lucky that it deigned to even enter the
    frame and remain there for a few moments. I went there to shoot the
    scene and didn't expect to have a creature in it.

    This, by the way, is a re-shoot of a scene I've shot before, and was
    done for a mandate in another group, but it wasn't used for that
    group because I had another shot I liked better. That answers your
    comment about my position on shooting "fresh".
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 19, 2013
    #12
  13. Tony Cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    : [furniture]
    :
    : > It's not the subject, but how the photographer sees the subject and
    : > what the photographer does with the subject that makes it a challenge.
    :
    : > Here's one I shot six days ago:
    :
    : > http://dl.dropbox.com/u/64147677/2013-03-10-100.jpg
    :
    : Nice cat, but I can't see detail in most of the fur.
    : Additionally, shouldn't the cat at least lounge on the
    : furniture? Or on that bird?

    I don't think you want much texture in the cat's fur. Everything else in the
    picture is bright solid colors. The cat needs to be solid black.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Mar 19, 2013
    #13
  14. Just as the groom needs to be solid black and the bride be
    solid white, right?

    There's texture in fur, and IMHO it belongs there. Just as I
    can see texture in the furniture.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Mar 20, 2013
    #14
  15. My condolences.

    :)

    Oh, there are ways to entice a cat to behave in certain ways ---
    but cats do have a free will. Maybe they'll allow you to use
    their furniture and their camera to make photos of themselves
    --- or maybe not.

    However, having some texture in fur is not so much dependent on a
    cooperating model, but on the actual dynamic range of the photo.

    Shooting only planned scenes and using only cooperating
    models is rather boring, IMHO, and only emphasizes planning,
    not observation and preparedness.

    It does. You're on the extreme side of it. I could be saying
    that you shouldn't use a photo that was in any way staged or
    pre-planned --- but I recognize that that would be extreme.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, Mar 20, 2013
    #15
  16. Tony Cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    I am not exactly a cat person myself (mainly due to allergies and a
    preference for dogs), but there are times a cat might be worthy of an
    iPhone shot.
    < http://db.tt/bIMswEZ7 >

    I don't go out of my way to shoot cat subjects with a decent camera
    unless it is a cheetah.
    < http://db.tt/w0bdoUro >
     
    Savageduck, Mar 20, 2013
    #16
  17. Tony Cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    Though I must confess, that was shot with my D300S. ;-)
     
    Savageduck, Mar 20, 2013
    #17
  18. Tony Cooper

    Frank S Guest

    Frank S, Mar 20, 2013
    #18
  19. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    I got the shot, didn't I? Isn't that utilization initiative?
    All shots are pre-planned to some extent. When I shoot "Street", the
    pre-planning is little more than raising the camera and firing, but
    all other shots have some planning involved. Even "Street" requires
    having the camera set to the shutter speed and aperture that is
    expected to give the best results for the conditions. That's
    planning.

    Or, don't you consider the angle, the relationship of the subject to
    the sun, the camera settings, the decision to use or not use fill-in
    flash, and the framing of a shot to be "planning"?

    I don't do much in the way of "staged shots", but anyone who shoots
    non-candid people shots stages their subjects. Or should. Anyone who
    shoots table-top or still life stages their shots. I do some of that.

    It seems to me that pre-planning and staging shots are two of the most
    important parts of coming up with a good photograph. The rest is just
    pushing the button.
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 20, 2013
    #19
  20. Tony Cooper

    Tony Cooper Guest

    This one's a bit soft, but I like the softness of it:
    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/64147677/2012-06-15-1.jpg
    It was taken at our zoo, and all the cats are behind fences that make
    shots difficult.

    No attempt was made to pose the subject.
     
    Tony Cooper, Mar 20, 2013
    #20
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