SI sports comments by Calvin Sambrook

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Calvin Sambrook, Dec 8, 2009.

  1. A special thank you to Bowser for posting this lot after I'd gone to bed.
    With that many good shots there'd have been no way I could have resisted
    commenting straight away if I'd been up.

    Games_Alan_Browne_2.jpg: I want to like this, I really do, and I can see
    what was being attempted but it just doesn't quite do it for me. I think
    maybe the subject is just a bit too blurred. The composition is great btw,
    the position of the subject in the frame combined with the direction the
    head is looking in work really well.

    SI sports - Cycling by Calvin Sambrook.jpg: Mine obviously. For once this
    is the shot I set out to take. Anna has been developing her Triathlon mount
    technique all season and at this event I was able to get in just the right
    place to shoot it. I chose a 300mm focal length and maximum aperture in
    order to defocus the background as much as I could as I knew it was going to
    be messy. I lay on the floor to get a powerful angle and to try to put the
    subject into the clear sky area. With lots of megapixels available I shot
    wide and cropped later as I knew I had only one chance and I got lucky that
    she came through transition alone. The action isn't as fast as it appears
    as the bike is not really moving forward much at this point but ultimately
    it's just luck as to the exact pose when the shutter fires.

    SI sports - Diving by Calvin Sambrook.jpg: I took this along with 6Gb more
    last summer and it didn't stand out as anything special at all. The
    original has too much detail in the foreground and the background is washed
    out. The mandate had me going back through my diving shots and although
    there are quite a few good action photos I wanted something a bit different.
    I played with the tone curve on this and managed to get a decent contrast in
    the background at which point the divers just popped out at me. I love the
    way there's a chaos of things going on but with one diver putting in a
    decent armstand in the middle. In a way I like it because it also shows how
    you can break some rules and improve the photo, there's chopped off heads,
    cluttered background, off verticals but none of them matter to my eye as I'm
    being pulled back to that one guy in the middle (who happens to be my son by
    the way).

    SI sports - Swimming by Calvin Sambrook.jpg. For me indoor action shots are
    a nightmare and I was torn between a whole raft of grainy, cluttered shots
    which had potential but weren't quite there. A couple of fencing shots
    which I'd really like to have used got abandoned as I just couldn't get them
    good enough, this swimming one however just about made it with some serious
    cropping and careful adjustment of contrast and saturation. Ideally I'd
    have preferred to use a much faster shutter and freeze the water but the
    grain was dismal enough anyway so I settled for this.

    SI_Games_Alan_Browne_I.jpg: I really like this. The composition is
    wonderful and the execution superb. The choice of focus and DoF works well
    and the control of reflections in the clock face picks up nicely on the
    white pieces. The only thing I'd maybe criticize is the strong highlight on
    the shoulder surface of the clock, it's slightly distracting.

    SPO_TimConway2_old.jpg: A good study and very well executed, I like this.
    There are lots of little things which help this shot, composition of course,
    good soft lighting but with enough shadow to be interesting, texture.
    Having the puzzle upside down avoids it being the focus of attention and
    forces the viewer back onto the people, very clever.

    SPO_TimConway3_old.jpg: I don't get this at all I'm afraid. The subject
    doesn't "talk" to me and there are too many technical problems getting in
    the way as well, composition, grain, lack of contrast.

    SPO_TimConway_old.jpg: A nice corporate brochure shot but I don't
    particularly find this works for me. I'm finding it hard to analyse what it
    is that doesn't work, maybe the inclusion of too many distracting features
    like parts of trees in the TL and the sand pit TR, maybe the fact that the
    golfers are all looking in different places.

    Sport01_RussellDurtschi.jpg: There's lots to like here but somehow it just
    doesn't quite have the punch it should do. I like the composition and of
    course the action but it needs the subject to stand out more, just a
    slightly lower camera angle would have had him totally in the sky and would
    also have made that bench more of a feature (as it is it's more of a
    distraction). Alternatively a more camera based solution might have been
    less DoF to soften the hills or a wide angle lens to make them smaller.

    Sport02_RussellDurtschi.jpg: I quite like this although I can't help feeling
    I shouldn't, technically that is! Somehow the composition, with the two
    distinct areas of interest between the two groups of people, manages to
    overcome the clutter and distraction and pull my eye back into the shot.
    Well done for picking a camera angle which made this work.

    Sport_Troy_Piggins_1.jpg: This is nicely executed and manages to keep the
    relaxed feel of a casual knockabout while having the precision and tension
    of a formal game. I particularly like the composition, with the action
    moving into the frame as well as the defocus of the background which I think
    adds to the shot.

    Sports-Bullseye-TonyCooper.jpg This is a shot where the subject just doesn't
    grab the attention the way it could. For me the impact is lost because of
    the relatively sharp focus of the background. The subject naturally
    generates two conflicting attention points as well which doesn't help.

    Sports-Checkers-TonyCooper.jpg: Wonderful. The post processing (at least
    that's what I assume it is) adds so much to this. The textures are
    fantastic and the lighting great too. It takes real artistic flair to see
    this final result in a raw photo and then to make it happen. One of my
    favourites.

    Sports-Games_Savageduck-01.jpg: I quite like the way the tension is built by
    the composition and the strange posture of the boy, either of these on their
    own would have looked wrong but together they seem to work. The tonal range
    is a bit strange although I guess that adds tension too.

    Sports-Games_Savageduck-02.jpg: No. A postcard shot but in my opinion
    nothing to grab the attention and hold it. Sorry.

    Sports-LawnBowling-TonyCooper.jpg: I love this. The composition just forces
    my attention to the balls and their tracks while the mass of detail in the
    background conceals the players almost completely. Superb.

    Sports-OldFarts-TonyCooper.jpg: The interesting textures and look of these
    subjects is lost here because of a confusing background. I'd love to see
    this again but with a really short DoF. Given that the shot is what it is
    maybe a much tighter composition in post would have helped, I think it
    might.

    bowser_sg-1.jpg: It these guys were wearing any other colour this would be a
    disaster of a shot. As it is it's great. The inclusion of lots of autumn
    tree colour set against the red kit works really well and the blokes on the
    right work really well compositionally too, adding a boundary to the shot,
    without them it would just fade away on both edges.

    bowser_sg-2.jpg: This is another shot which demonstrates one of the common
    problems with sports action photography, making the subject stand out from
    the background. It's really hard to do and I feel that this shot is just
    the wrong side of the line, the arms and ball especially are lost in the
    visual clutter. I'd definitely have photoshopped that post out too, it just
    chops the shot in half.

    bowser_sg-3.jpg: It actually took me a second look before I even noticed the
    player here, he's so lost in the background. If the original has enough
    resolution there's actually quite a good shot to be rescued by cropping in
    tight on the player and the two officials behind him although a good bit of
    photoshop would be needed to make it work, not least removing that post he's
    about to impale himself on.

    sports-dudley-hanks.JPG: I've never been to an ice hockey game but I've been
    to ice rinks and they're not that cold so how come this shot makes it look
    like an Arctic wilderness? I guess it's the overexposure and uplift off
    black which do that. This shot has power and tension. The composition and
    the use of off vertical (that was intentional right?) as well as the posture
    of the player make everything so immediate. The shutter speed adds just the
    right amount of action blur. I look at this and realise I'd have mucked
    this shot up in so many ways! Great.

    Once again thank you all for sharing your photos. I think this was one of
    the best collections for a long while.
     
    Calvin Sambrook, Dec 8, 2009
    #1
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  2. Calvin Sambrook

    tony cooper Guest

    I am not a hockey fan, and I really don't understand a lot of the
    nuances of the game. However, a few years ago I was in Boston so I
    went to the fabled Boston Gardens to see a hockey game.

    I really didn't appreciate much of what went on down on the ice, but I
    enjoyed myself immensely watching the spectators. Boston fans really
    get into a game.
     
    tony cooper, Dec 8, 2009
    #2
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  3. I think Detroit takes the cake on that one, though I've never been to a
    hockey game in the Red Wings' home palace. Too many squid.....
    As to hockey in Oz, one day, I am sure, if the game increases in
    popularity. Now in the U.S., we have teams from places like Florida and
    Arizona where there's never been natural ice. It just doesn't seem
    right.....remembering the original 6 or 8....when 95% of the players
    were from Canada.
     
    John McWilliams, Dec 9, 2009
    #3
  4. Calvin Sambrook

    tony cooper Guest

    I was seated next to a young, well-dressed couple. He looked like a
    bond trader. The referee called "icing the puck", and I had no idea
    what that meant, so I asked the guy what it meant.

    He turned to me and snarled, "If you don't understand the fucking
    game, read a fucking book". This was in the 70s when such language
    was not heard in polite company.
     
    tony cooper, Dec 9, 2009
    #4
  5. Well, what'd you expect from a fucking bond trader??

    :)

    There's a lot less icing in today's game than of old, and goals scored
    off faceoffs are rare as hen's teeth, not that they were common 40 years
    ago.
     
    John McWilliams, Dec 9, 2009
    #5
  6. Or freeze in place and think "I am not food, I am not food, I am not...."

    Nice shot. Yours? When?
     
    John McWilliams, Dec 9, 2009
    #6
  7. Calvin Sambrook

    Robert Coe Guest

    : I am not a hockey fan, and I really don't understand a lot of the
    : nuances of the game. However, a few years ago I was in Boston so I
    : went to the fabled Boston Gardens to see a hockey game.
    :
    : I really didn't appreciate much of what went on down on the ice, but I
    : enjoyed myself immensely watching the spectators. Boston fans really
    : get into a game.

    The next time you're in Boston in the winter, try to go to a college hockey
    game. We have three of the best college teams in the country (Boston
    University, Boston College, and Northeastern University), and some years
    Harvard is pretty good as well. College hockey doesn't rely on fistfights the
    way professional hockey does, so you get to see the game the way it's intended
    to be played.

    A tip: In the Harvard arena, which isn't very big and where almost all the
    seats are good, I like to sit behind one of the goals. It seems
    counterintuitive, but you get a great view of the action because the players
    are coming toward you as they attack the goal.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 9, 2009
    #7
  8. Calvin Sambrook

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : >On Tue, 08 Dec 2009 16:54:18 -0500, tony cooper
    : >
    : >>On Wed, 09 Dec 2009 07:39:29 +1000, Troy Piggins
    : >>
    : >>>Being from Australia, I had never been to an ice hockey game in
    : >>>my life. Few years ago I was travelling around Europe with a
    : >>>mate. We were in Prague, Czech Republic, and there was an ice
    : >>>hockey stadium over the road from the Backpackers we were staying
    : >>>in. By pure coincidence there was a "big" game on that night, so
    : >>>we decided to go along and watch.
    : >>
    : >>I am not a hockey fan, and I really don't understand a lot of the
    : >>nuances of the game. However, a few years ago I was in Boston so I
    : >>went to the fabled Boston Gardens to see a hockey game.
    : >>
    : >>I really didn't appreciate much of what went on down on the ice, but I
    : >>enjoyed myself immensely watching the spectators. Boston fans really
    : >>get into a game.
    : >
    : >Yes, we do! Sometimes we're sober enough to see the end of the game,
    : >too. Bruins fans are a much rowdier bunch than Celtics fans, though.
    :
    : I was seated next to a young, well-dressed couple. He looked like a
    : bond trader. The referee called "icing the puck", and I had no idea
    : what that meant, so I asked the guy what it meant.
    :
    : He turned to me and snarled, "If you don't understand the fucking
    : game, read a fucking book". This was in the 70s when such language
    : was not heard in polite company.

    Translation: He didn't know the answer either. He probably *was* a bond
    trader.

    Suppose a player shoots the puck from his own end of the ice, and it goes all
    the way across the other team's goal line. If it happens to go in the net, it
    counts as a goal. If it doesn't, it's called icing, and they then have a
    face-off back in the shooter's end of the ice. You're allowed to ice the puck
    if your team is shorthanded (one or more players in the penalty box), but not
    otherwise.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 9, 2009
    #8
  9. Icing is waived off more often than not: If a Defenseman could have
    reasonably intercepted the puck before it crosses the last line (GLE),
    or if the Offense can touch it first in the icing zone, play goes on.

    I think one reason there's less icing now than a long time ago is the
    skill levels are higher, and stick technology is better; players are
    able to lift the puck - lofting it into the far end but softly enough
    that it doesn't enter the icing zone when they need a desperate clear.
     
    John McWilliams, Dec 9, 2009
    #9
  10. Waiting on the fucking advance.....
     
    John McWilliams, Dec 9, 2009
    #10
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