Significant difference between Nikon D200 and Nikon D70 Image Quality?

Discussion in 'Nikon' started by Ron, Jul 22, 2006.

  1. Ron

    Ron Guest

    G'day all. I currently own a nikon D70 and am thinking of upgrading. Anyone
    out there used both the nikon D200 and D70 that can give me their opinions
    re: image quality differences between them? Also is the viewfinder brighter
    than the terrible D70 viewfinder?

    Many thanks.

    Cheers
    Ron
     
    Ron, Jul 22, 2006
    #1
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  2. what's terrible about the D70 viewfinder?
    Isn't it an SLR? Isn't the viewfinder simply a mirror/prismatic view
    through the lense? and if so, what's terrible about that?

    it's those dicky lcd viewfinder things I find 'terrible'
     
    Andrew Hennell, Jul 22, 2006
    #2
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  3. Ron

    [BnH] Guest

    Larger VF
    Faster speed [+ bigger buffer too]
    More solid body
    Better AWB
    Lower noise @ high ISO
    Optional vertial grip [MB-D200]

    D200 and D70 sits in a different class as D200 is D100 sucessor.
    Try waiting for the D80 that will be announced in a few days.
    MAYBE Nikon already sort out their strategy and
    actually sells the camera within few days after announcement.
     
    [BnH], Jul 23, 2006
    #3
  4. Ron

    Joan Guest

    And what lens do you think will be the kit lens for the new camera?
    The hard-to-find 18-200? Maybe that's why they've been kept in short
    supply.

    --
    Joan
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/joan-in-manly

    "[BnH]" <b18[at]ii[dot]net> wrote in message
    : Larger VF
    : Faster speed [+ bigger buffer too]
    : More solid body
    : Better AWB
    : Lower noise @ high ISO
    : Optional vertial grip [MB-D200]
    :
    : D200 and D70 sits in a different class as D200 is D100 sucessor.
    : Try waiting for the D80 that will be announced in a few days.
    : MAYBE Nikon already sort out their strategy and
    : actually sells the camera within few days after announcement.
    :
    : : > G'day all. I currently own a nikon D70 and am thinking of
    upgrading.
    : > Anyone out there used both the nikon D200 and D70 that can give me
    their
    : > opinions re: image quality differences between them? Also is the
    : > viewfinder brighter than the terrible D70 viewfinder?
    : >
    : > Many thanks.
    : >
    : > Cheers
    : > Ron
    : >
    :
    :
     
    Joan, Jul 23, 2006
    #4
  5. Ron

    Jeff R. Guest


    I can answer that with another question:

    Is there *anyone* who grew up using film SLRs who is _not_ disappointed with
    the VF of a dSLR?
     
    Jeff R., Jul 23, 2006
    #5
  6. What is *your* disappointment with the viewfinder of a dSLR?

    I use Nikon F90x & D50 regularly (and D70 & D100 less so), along with
    dSLRs of other brands. Going between the Nikons hasn't been an issue
    at all. I'm not disappointed with the viewfinders in any of my Nikons -
    perhaps you can enlighten me as to what I should consider a disappointment.
     
    Andrew Hennell, Jul 23, 2006
    #6
  7. Ron

    Ron Guest

    I also use both a nikon F5 and a pentax MZ6 and I can assure you that both
    their viewfinders are much brighter and clearer than the nikon D70
    viewfinder.

    Cheers
    Ron
     
    Ron, Jul 23, 2006
    #7
  8. Ron

    Dick Simpson Guest

    Yes, after a series of SLRs (Mamiya, Minolta and Pentax) I`m not the
    least bit disappointed with the viewfinder in a Pentax ist DS.
    Simmo
     
    Dick Simpson, Jul 23, 2006
    #8
  9. same lense used between the f5 & the d70?
     
    Andrew Hennell, Jul 23, 2006
    #9
  10. There is a reason. While I can't tell you *how much* better.. the D70
    uses a mirror 'prism' ie, it is an empty space with mirrors doing the
    reflecting. The D200 uses a real glass prism, and the quality is MUCH
    better by all accounts. Why the mirror-prism system doesn't work well,
    I'm not sure, and would be happy to be enlightened.

    I've looked down the D70 vf, and while it isn't terrible, it's
    certainly not a viewfinder to be very proud of.
     
    mark.thomas.7, Jul 23, 2006
    #10
  11. Ron

    Jeff R. Guest

    Sure:

    1) size of image. Constrained due to size of sensor (so I can't speak for
    the 5D etc.) Its not unlike looking down the wrong end of a telescope.

    2) dull image. No doubt due to the modern fashion to produce you-beaut
    zooms which open up to (wow!) f/3.5 or so. When I was last "into"
    equipment, no manufacturer would have *dared* to produce a standard lens
    slower than f/2. f/1.8 or 1.4 was the standard. Zooms? Pahhh! Kiddy stuff.

    3) lack of focussing aids. A split-image or a microprism wouldn't hurt -
    'though it probably wouldn't work too well with the dismal slow lenes of
    today. (Yes, I know you can get them as "optional extras".)

    I know I'm just a grumpy old sod, and that AF is the "way to go", but I used
    to (still do) get a kick out of seeing the shimmering microprism go steady
    when the focus was pulled up right... (sigghhh)

    I have both Pentax and Nikon dSLRs, and despite the "common knowledge" that
    prism viewfinders are better than mirrored, I find the Nikon mirror markedly
    superior to the Pentax prism - even with similar speed lenses.

    Neither of them come within cooee of *any* of the twenty or so 35mm SLRs I
    have owned.

    They _work_ - the AF operates - but the view is dark and dismal compared to,
    say, my 35-year-old Pentax Spotmatic. (which cost $119 nearly four decades
    ago).

    ....and don't get me started on modern cameras making you wait until
    *they're* ready to shoot!
     
    Jeff R., Jul 23, 2006
    #11
  12. Ron

    [BnH] Guest

    Since you are used to D50, D70 and D100 VF , I would suggest you to try D1
    or D2 VF and let us know what you think.
    I don't have 20-20 vision hence D1 and D2 VF helps me a lot when I am
    snipping my object.
    D50 and D70 VF OTOH are also quite good , but not upto the F90 or F5
    standard that offers 92 to 100% viewing.
    [D50 and D70 only 82% iirc]
    And about the lenses, yes I use the same lenses. 17-35 / 2.8 , 28-70 /2.8
    and 80-200 / 2.8 most of the time.

    =bob=
     
    [BnH], Jul 23, 2006
    #12
  13. Ron

    Pete D Guest

    I find my Pentax D-SLR pretty much as good as my film Pentax cameras, having
    a PentaPrism helps of course. :)
     
    Pete D, Jul 23, 2006
    #13
  14. Ron

    Pete D Guest

    Extremely doubtful I would think.
     
    Pete D, Jul 23, 2006
    #14
  15. Ron

    POTD.com.au Guest

    Yep... me! Nothing wrong with the 1DS2's VF. ;-)
     
    POTD.com.au, Jul 23, 2006
    #15
  16. Ron

    Mr.T Guest

    What has the image sensor got to do with the viewfinder image, other than
    your lens choice?
    stuff.

    Last time I looked, the big SLR/DSLR makers still had pretty much the same
    lenses available.
    If *YOU* choose to buy a slower lens, don't blame the manufacturer. They are
    happy to sell you a body and YOUR choice of lens.
    If you need *exactly* the same lenses, then buy a full frame DSLR obviously.
    Yep, the better SLR/DSLR's have interchangeable focusing screens as always.
    How funny, I always hated the old Spotmatic for it's dismal viewfinder
    compared to the Olympus OM1 for example.
    Yes, that 0.15 seconds can be a real bitch :)
    Not to worry, they're getting faster all the time.

    MrT.
     
    Mr.T, Jul 23, 2006
    #16
  17. Well, one would hope that the viewfinder screen would closely match the
    size of the sensor - if it doesn't you'll find you have one hell of a
    time framing images.
    So.. Given that the viewfinder screen matches the sensor size, an APS
    camera (ie almost all DSLR's) has a viewfinder screen that is 1.5x
    smaller than the screen in a 35mm camera. There are 2 ways this can be
    handled - a perceptibly smaller screen (which makes manual focus harder,
    and also framing to some extent harder), or they can use the optics in
    the viewfinder to make the screen to appear the same size. However doing
    this means that the screen is roughly 1 stop darker.
    All else being equal then, the viewscreen in a 35mm camera (or fullframe
    DSLR) will be either bigger or brighter (or some combination of both)
    compared to an APS camera.
     
    Graham Fountain, Jul 23, 2006
    #17
  18. Ron

    Jeff R. Guest

    You're serious?
    Ask yourself what determines the size of the flip mirror, and hence the
    mirror/prism, and hence the focus screen, and hence the overall VF
    appearance.
    No they're not.
    Both of my dSLRs did not make available decent fast compatible lenses at
    time of purchase. I asked when I bought both of them for a body-only price,
    and they either refused, or quoted "$5 less." Seriously.

    Uh huh. $5k is such a reasonable price, too.

    Yes - I said that.
    ....and SLRs (35mm) don't need interchangable screens to get decent focussing
    aids. They're built in.
    Not my recollection (from 2 minutes ago), but hey - YMMV.
    How was the OM1 compared to a dSLR? (my original point)

    Har de har.
    I'm referring to the modes which will not allow the shutter to trip until
    the camera is convinced that focus is OK - even when it *is* OK.
    I'd rather make that judgement call myself.
     
    Jeff R., Jul 23, 2006
    #18
  19. strange - my Nikon dSLRs accept all my Nikkor & Tokina lenses, even my
    fast ones. And I've since purchased additional Nikkor lenses. I
    suspect they _were_ available, but you didn't want to pay for them. The
    lense that comes with the dSLR is a freebie that 'does the job', but if
    you want performance you can pay for it. Simple concept really :)
    No, "same lense" is available for both film, full-frame and 'part-frame'
    dSLRs. The body doesn't change the lense.
    not always.
    How selective you are in what you want to pick on. If YOU set it to
    such a setting, then you expect the wait. If you set your camera to
    manual focus, then YOU can make that 'judgement call' yourself.

    From your post, I doubt any dSLR will satisfy you - perhaps go back to
    your box brownie.
     
    Andrew Hennell, Jul 23, 2006
    #19
  20. Ron

    werdan Guest

    Mirrors bend light by reflection which exhibit some loss each time the light
    changes direction.

    Prisms bend light by refraction which, when the angles are correct, is
    lossless.
     
    werdan, Jul 24, 2006
    #20
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