Simple way of estimating shutter and focus lag

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Bryn James, Dec 7, 2004.

  1. Bryn James

    Bryn James Guest

    I saw a nice demo on TV of how to estimate shutter and focus lag on a
    digital camera: put a paper arrow on a record turntable set to 33-1/3
    rpm, and press the shutter button as the arrow passes a given point,
    then check where the arrow shows up on the digital picture. One
    revolution is 1.8 seconds, or 5ms per degree of rotation.

    Not as accurate as the pros might need, but cheap and simple :)
     
    Bryn James, Dec 7, 2004
    #1
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  2. Bryn James

    Owamanga Guest

    Nice one, but how can you tell it didn't go round three times?

    ....some of these digicams are *awfully slow*.

    I'd actually like to do this test on my DV camera, I am sure it's near
    a second and a half. But I don't know what a 'record turntable' is.

    You'd need to repeat the test 3 or more times to see what influence
    your own reaction time to trigger it has. Have 4 beers and repeat.
     
    Owamanga, Dec 7, 2004
    #2
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  3. Bryn James

    Ben Rum Guest


    Digital camera & record turntable owners.. A bit of an oxymoron isn't it?
    (Superstar DJ's excluded)

    How do I do it with my MP3 player?
     
    Ben Rum, Dec 7, 2004
    #3
  4. Or use an analog stopwatch.
     
    Mickey Dunston, Dec 7, 2004
    #4
  5. Bryn James

    secheese Guest

    Easier to just read the spec sheet or review data.
     
    secheese, Dec 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Bryn James

    secheese Guest

    secheese, Dec 8, 2004
    #6
  7. Bryn James

    Larry Guest

    Probably a good deal less than the delay in my 59 YO brain/body.

    It does seem though to be a good thumbnail measurement for a
    photographer/camera combination.
     
    Larry, Dec 8, 2004
    #7
  8. Bryn James

    Bryn James Guest

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