skate film director. what is the best camera out there for filming skate videos.

Discussion in 'Professional Video Production' started by kyle, Apr 5, 2006.

  1. kyle

    kyle Guest

    hey i was wonderin i have been reaserching cannon gl-1 gl-2 and some
    other sonys i have been wondering. what is the best camera out there
    with mini dv tapes that would be good for action shots. and i need a
    smooth one too so my filming isnt all shakey. help?
     
    kyle, Apr 5, 2006
    #1
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  2. Well, one with a CCD image sensor rather than a CMOS sensor would help
    with fast motion. All of them come with various shutter settings. You
    could try shooting progressive frames instead of interlaced, see if you
    like that kind of look.

    On a skater's budget you can't afford the Viper, but one of the HDV
    camcorders offers an overcranked motion mode that could give you
    super-sweet super-slow motion. Editing with HDV is still kind of
    voodoo-like, and more work ands expense right now. You could use a
    regular DV camcorder shooting DV25 and then apply Re-timer or a similar
    slomo plug-in to interpolate more frames and get a smooth slomo that
    way.

    As to motion stabilizers, I like Canon's electro-optical systems the
    best, electronic image stabilization is a poor seconds choice IMO. For
    holding the camcorder, I would suggest the Manfrotto FigRig wheel, but
    on your budget, what i'd do is a knock-off version: get a buddy to weld
    some $5 perforated angle iron to a used 26 inch steel bike rim, add
    some pipe wrap foam and tape and use THAT to get a nice 2-handed grip
    on the camera for close-in handheld work. Should work for something
    smaller than the GL-1. Steadicams in the price range you have will not
    do as well a job, IMO. The wheel is something you could use while
    skating along with another guy and shooting. It also lets you shoot low
    and high angles with ease. it's just unfortunate manfrotto charges so
    much for it.

    Wear a helmet. Always. Roll on.
     
    nobody special, Apr 5, 2006
    #2
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  3. Well, one with a CCD image sensor rather than a CMOS sensor would help
    with fast motion. All of them come with various shutter settings. You
    could try shooting progressive frames instead of interlaced, see if you
    like that kind of look.

    On a skater's budget you can't afford the Viper, but one of the HDV
    camcorders offers an overcranked motion mode that could give you
    super-sweet super-slow motion. Editing with HDV is still kind of
    voodoo-like, and more work ands expense right now. You could use a
    regular DV camcorder shooting DV25 and then apply Re-timer or a similar
    slomo plug-in to interpolate more frames and get a smooth slomo that
    way.

    As to motion stabilizers, I like Canon's electro-optical systems the
    best, electronic image stabilization is a poor seconds choice IMO. For
    holding the camcorder, I would suggest the Manfrotto FigRig wheel, but
    on your budget, what i'd do is a knock-off version: get a buddy to weld
    some $5 perforated angle iron to a used 26 inch steel bike rim, add
    some pipe wrap foam and tape and use THAT to get a nice 2-handed grip
    on the camera for close-in handheld work. Should work for something
    smaller than the GL-1. Steadicams in the price range you have will not
    do as well a job, IMO. The wheel is something you could use while
    skating along with another guy and shooting. It also lets you shoot low
    and high angles with ease. it's just unfortunate manfrotto charges so
    much for it.

    FORGOT to mention, to look less shakey, use enough light and keep the
    lens on WIDE, and use you body to get the WIDE lene CLOSE.
    Telephoto(zooming in) magnifies every little shake and bump.

    Wear a helmet. Always. Roll on.
     
    nobody special, Apr 5, 2006
    #3
  4. kyle

    doc Guest

    check out the lightweight, powerful might, in the Panasonci DVX100B with 24p
    and lots of bells and whistles, let alone small and easy to hand carry and
    pack away. several tv shows on primetime are using them. george clooney
    has even been photographed with one in his hands doing filming himself for
    one of the shows :eek:)

    drd
     
    doc, Apr 5, 2006
    #4
  5. kyle

    kyle Guest

    dude those cameras are cool and all, but im looking at 3 gl-1 gl-2 and
    the sony one. i have a mini dv camera already and pinnicle. i just want
    it to be a smoth thing whats the best out of those three. ya ur right
    dude this is gona take me liek 3 years to get so ya.
     
    kyle, Apr 6, 2006
    #5
  6. kyle

    kyle Guest

    for got to ad cuz uh yeah i need like mostion stabilixer that works
    really good
     
    kyle, Apr 6, 2006
    #6
  7. GL-2 based on the Cannon electro-optical stabilization and that your
    short list is *very* short.

    Get a wide angle adapter for it; for skate videos, shot close to the
    action, you'll want that.

    Remember that if you're making them to make money off them, then
    renting a better camera just for the day you shoot gets you much more
    power and quality than getting a lesser camera that sits on a shelf 350
    days a year, costing you money and not making any. The most stable pics
    you will make will be by keeping the lens wide and physically moving
    closer to the action, not zooming. Do spend 10-20 bucks to make your
    own figrig style grip, try it out. or just stop by the bikes or
    automotive section next time you're in a big store, try holding and
    moving a spare bike tire or better yet, one of those steering wheel rim
    cover things fromt he auto accessories dept. Hold it in front of you
    with a tw-handed grip, see how stable and natural the position feels,
    how you can twist or tilt with precision, or hold it steady while
    walking; your two bent arms take up most of the shock. If you
    hand-hold these tiny cameras up to ypur face or chest, you find your
    wrist gets into a very cramped position that's not stable for long
    periods of time. A 2-handed grip with somedistance oput from your body
    will male your shooting look more stable.

    Other options include a monopod: the stability of a tripod, with no
    setup or teardown time, and the ability to instantly move, stick, move,
    stick, from position to position. If you collapse a monopod down but
    leave it attached to the camera, it works also as a poor man's
    steadicam.

    Also, save up for something better than the Pinnacle editor; I don't
    know one person that's happy with theirs.
     
    nobody special, Apr 6, 2006
    #7
  8. kyle

    kyle Guest

    short list? well what exact name of camera would you recomend. 2500
    dollars or less. it needs motion stabilizer, fisheye option, wide angle
    op, and is mini dv. that has a handle like actual skate cameras do
     
    kyle, Apr 9, 2006
    #8
  9. kyle

    Steve King Guest

    snip

    that has a handle like actual skate cameras do
    What does this mean?

    Steve King
     
    Steve King, Apr 9, 2006
    #9
  10. kyle

    kyle Guest

    if youve ever watched a skate film you would know. skaters call em
    death lenses. cameras with handles at the top for stabilization
     
    kyle, Apr 9, 2006
    #10
  11. I'm not Warren Miller, but he perhaps means the camera cradles or cages
    we use for the "low-carry" position on things like steadicams and
    booms, I think, which convert the threaded screw hole on the camera
    bottom into a similar deal for top-mounting. You know, for the "dog's
    eye view" POV shots. This would be good to fly the camera along an inch
    off the ground next to the skateboard wheels. The camera's weight
    concentrated at the bottom of a hand-held pole or monopod thus
    converted has a lot if inertia and gives a fairly stable picture if you
    keep the lens wide and a light grip on the top of the suspension pole.
    But one mistake and boom, you have a Polo mallet and a broken lens.

    I think most camcorders have a threaded insert in the top of the carry
    handle which normally fits a camera light. I would not risk suspending
    the camera from that insert, as it wasn't designed for that kind of
    tension/shear situation load wise, and will give put unexpectedly at
    some point. Safer to cage the camera, and this is something you could
    make for yourself with inexpensive perforated steel strapping from a
    hardware store and regular grip/hand tools. The most exotic shop item
    you would need would be a bench vise to help bend the strapping steel.
    The whole thing could bolt together for simplicity.
     
    nobody special, Apr 10, 2006
    #11
  12. Why would you need all that? :) On Deck Dogz we used an Arri SR2 with a
    9.5mm lens and a good skater to shoot the skating footage of Tony Hawk.
    Didn't need no stabilizers and stuff. Like "nobody special" suggested, get
    a wide-angle adapter, and shoot as wide as possible, following all the
    action.

    cheers

    -martin-
    --
    Never be afraid to try something new.
    Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark.
    A large group of professionals built the Titanic.

    Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php
     
    Martin Heffels, Apr 19, 2006
    #12
  13. kyle

    popwar Guest

    im a litle shaky on recording thats why
     
    popwar, Apr 20, 2006
    #13
  14. Don't worry. With wide-angle you will hardly notice. It's only on close-ups
    that you will see a hefty moving frame and it will look annoying. Also you
    will have to consider your end-format to what you want to play your movie
    on. If it's "just" tv, it's even less of a worry. If you plan of showing it
    on the big screen, it gets a bit more of a worry, because you don't want to
    place buckets in the cinema for people getting sea-sick ;-)

    cheers

    -martin-
    --
    Never be afraid to try something new.
    Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark.
    A large group of professionals built the Titanic.

    Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php
     
    Martin Heffels, Apr 20, 2006
    #14
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