slide/neg. scanner

Discussion in 'Scanners' started by Graeme Hogan, Jun 25, 2003.

  1. Graeme Hogan

    Graeme Hogan Guest

    What's the best/cheapest scanner for around $250.
    Many thanks
     
    Graeme Hogan, Jun 25, 2003
    #1
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  2. Graeme Hogan

    Valar Guest

    For that kind of money, the only slide scanner you can get is a used HP
    Photosmart S20 (or 20S?), barely useable as a slide scanner.
     
    Valar, Jun 25, 2003
    #2
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  3. You need to add another zero...
    --
    Geoff Wise
    Wise's Wilderness
    http://www.wises.com.au

    Excuse the hotmail email address, too much junk mail.
     
    Wise's Wilderness, Jun 25, 2003
    #3
  4. Graeme Hogan

    Mr Biggus, Guest

    Add another $150-$200 . .and get yourself a decent PrimeFilm 1800 scanner.

    Any idea where in Melbourne to have a look at one of these?

    Im lookin for a scanner to go through boxes and boxes of negatives
    from my parents over 40 yrs!! scanning them in sheets would be so much
    quicker...

    Can you also scan the old ones with the cardboard boarder on them????

    Thanks
    Bruce
     
    Mr Biggus,, Jun 25, 2003
    #4
  5. Graeme Hogan

    [BnH] Guest

    We actually sell them.
    Last time [1 - 2 years ago ] our client bought them [ 5 scanners ] it was
    around $450 each.

    I'll find out what's the price now.

    Cardboard border ? u mean the white slide mount ?
    I believe so.

    =bob=
     
    [BnH], Jun 25, 2003
    #5
  6. Graeme Hogan

    Mr Biggus, Guest

    We actually sell them.
    where are you?
    kewl .... ball park for the HP's Ive been lookin at.
    Sweet... Thanks!
    yes. the thing most slides came with in the 1970's...
    Thanks...
     
    Mr Biggus,, Jun 25, 2003
    #6
  7. Graeme Hogan

    Phred Guest

    Be careful Biggus. I really suspect you could be disappointed. My
    own "searching" over recent months suggests I would need to spend in
    the low thousands of dollars to get a practical slide scanner (i.e one
    that produces an acceptable scan in a convenient manner).

    I've got many, many boxes of Kodachromes. I'm convinced that the only
    serious option for digitising them is to use one of those scanners
    with an automatic slide feeder so you can just bung in a batch at a
    time and walk away. Otherwise you will spend your life on the job and
    give up before you've barely started.

    Anyway, do a google for "PrimeFilm 1800" and check out some of the
    user reviews. I only looked at one set , and the best it scored was
    2 out of 5 (average 1.7). [But it seems there are different versions
    of the "1800" judging by one reviewer's comments, so this set of
    reviews may not apply to the one you're looking at.]
    <http://www.photographyreview.com/PRD_130161_3126crx.aspx>

    Mind you, some journalists do rate it higher (but then the cycnic in
    me says most of them just reproduce the publicity blurb from the
    manufacturer). See:
    <http://www.referenceguide.com/reviews/pacific1800.htm>


    Cheers, Phred.
     
    Phred, Jun 25, 2003
    #7
  8. Graeme Hogan

    Brenton Guest

    otmail email address, too much junk mail.
    You will need to go for a flat bed scanner that can do film for that
    cost (or close to that cost)
    Brenton
     
    Brenton, Jun 25, 2003
    #8
  9. Graeme Hogan

    Auspics Guest

    I've got a nearly new Canon 9900f scanner you can have cheap
    I bought it and then because of the level of my work, decided to go for a
    dedicated film scanner instead. I have scanned 35mm and 6x10 film as well as
    photos for restoration and it works quite well but unfortunately, not at the
    professional level Canon claim. The RRP is $799 but I'll sell it for $600
    (plus freight). This is about as cheap as you'll get a good quality
    slide/film scanner.

    Everything is as new. The packaging, the paperwork and the scanner itself.
    There is absolutely nothing wrong with it either. It's in Brisbane and you
    are welcome to see it working on your own film or mine.
    0421 288815
    Justin
    -----------------------------------------
     
    Auspics, Jun 25, 2003
    #9
  10. Graeme Hogan

    Adam F Guest

    i saw an epson 2240 (or something) at harvey norman's yesterday for $199
    which had a neg/slide attachment

    sure it only does 300dpi but that's good enough for 10x15cm prints from most
    inkjet printer i would have thought...and more than good enough for
    uploading and sharing...


    adam f
     
    Adam F, Jun 26, 2003
    #10
  11. Graeme Hogan

    Auspics Guest

    The problem with low cost scanners is not so much the scan quality... Most
    will do a pretty good scan but the speed with which they will scan film. The
    one I'm selling does supurb quality but to scan a 6x9 neg at it's highest
    resolution (3200dpi) and 48 bit colour, it can take 15 minutes to finish.
    It's a whole other story that PhotoShop coughs at editing 48 bit files.

    God only knows where Canon got the idea this was a professional scanner.
    Having said that... Canon film/flatbed scanners are pretty good at the
    quality end and to scan a print for enlarging, are fast and reliable... They
    just bog down at scanning serious number of slides or film.
    JT
     
    Auspics, Jun 26, 2003
    #11
  12. Graeme Hogan

    Phred Guest

    I don't wonder! Isn't 3200 dpi about 1.5MB of "dots" per sq. cm?
    Is your 6x9 in inches or centimetres? Even if the latter, we're still
    looking at about 82MB of "dots" or about 490MB for the uncompressed
    image at 48 bits.
     
    Phred, Jun 26, 2003
    #12
  13. Graeme Hogan

    Lyn Guest

    ummm... let me see... for the sake of simplicity lets just say that a slide
    is an inch wide x one inch high.
    If you can the slide at 300 dots per inch you will end up with a picture
    that is only 300 pixels wide x 300 pixels high.
    If you print this at 300 dpi the picture will only be one inch high x one
    inch wide.
    If you print it at 200 dpi (believe this is the minimum that places like
    Teds will do digital printing) the picture will be around 1.5 inches high by
    1.5 inches wide.
    Spend an extra $150 on an epson with a built in TPU and scan them at 1200
    dpi, or 600 if you only want to use them on the web.
     
    Lyn, Aug 1, 2003
    #13
  14. Graeme Hogan

    Adam F Guest

    Well the Epson SAYS 1200x600 or so dpi, afaik 300dpi is a so-called "true
    dpi" the shop uses to give the customer an idea of what sort of print res
    they can get with it...I could be wrong (often am).


    Adam F
     
    Adam F, Aug 3, 2003
    #14
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