slides on overcast day

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Jud McCranie, Dec 26, 2003.

  1. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    When Elite Chrome is used on an overcast day without a skylight
    filter, it looks a little too blue. Is Kodachrome the same way?
     
    Jud McCranie, Dec 26, 2003
    #1
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  2. Jud, I don't know for sure, but I seem to recall that in the "old days"
    Kodachrome tended a bit towards the red and "Ektachrome" towards the blue.

    And the sky is blue! Even under overcast. It shows up on film more so than
    to the naked eye. But I haven't had a particular problem with it. Overcast
    lighting can be so wonderful, depending on what you're making pictures of.
    Can you post any examples somewhere?

    Charles

    P.S. Does a skylight - e.g. "1A" - slightly pinkish or rosy hue - compensate
    adequately for this? I almost always use one, so perhaps that's why I
    haven't noticed a problem. I've always been concerned about the image
    degradation from adding more glass, and I know some pros who rarely use
    filters, for that reason. But then one day I scratched a lens, and my camera
    guy pointed out to me that filters cause a lot less image degradation than
    that!

    ====

    Charles T. Low
    - remove "UN"
    www.boatdocking.com/Photos/ - gallery
    www.ctlow.ca/Photo/ - essay (equipment is neat, but it's really all
    composition)

    ====
     
    Charles T. Low, Dec 27, 2003
    #2
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  3. In the old days (before I switched to digital), I tended to use Fuji film
    because I thought the oclors were more natural. If I used Kodak film, I
    preferred Ektachrome, for the same reason.

    I think Kodak makes Kodachrome for the masses who like certian colors ot be
    emphasized.

    One of the pleasures of digital photography is that I have better control
    over the color in my pictures.
     
    Marvin Margoshes, Dec 27, 2003
    #3
  4. Jud McCranie

    Jud McCranie Guest

    Yes, that's what the skylight filter is for. I don't want to leave a
    skylight filter on all of the time because with print film on sunny
    days, it gives a pink cast to print film. Also, I shoot more print
    film than slides, and print film doesn't seem to be bothered as much
    as Elite chrome by overcast days.
     
    Jud McCranie, Dec 27, 2003
    #4
  5. Jud McCranie

    flytoomuch Guest

    And Velvia doesn't exagerate colors? I have never seen a Velvia sky
    in nature.. only on film... nice saturated color but not natural.
     
    flytoomuch, Jan 18, 2004
    #5
  6. Jud McCranie

    flytoomuch Guest

    Yup... Your eye sees what it wants to see.. Film sees the color that
    is there. Any slide film will look "bluer" in open shade or on an
    overcast day because it is. Print film doesn't show this because the
    printers compensate during the print process.. but if you took two
    identical pictures, one on a cloudy day and one on a sunny day,
    printed them the same settings on the printer, the cloudy day pic
    would look bluer


    Jim
     
    flytoomuch, Jan 18, 2004
    #6
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