Some from the weekend

Discussion in 'Australia Photography' started by Troy Piggins, Aug 15, 2007.

  1. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    Went to Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary last weekend. Took lots of
    photos, but wasn't particularly happy with most of them. I
    thought these were the picks of the bunch.

    Bokeh Emu :
    http://piggo.com/~troy/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/IMG_2340_800x533.JPG
    I thought this was the pick of them.

    I think you're old enough to move out now, son. :
    http://piggo.com/~troy/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/IMG_2345_800x533.JPG
    Self-critique - would've liked to get right in closer to the
    joey, but the little bugger only had his head out for about 10
    seconds. Also the colours seemed a little washed out so I
    increased the saturation a little, but not sure if it's enough or
    something else I could do.

    Dude, where did I put my keys? :
    http://piggo.com/~troy/gallery/albums/userpics/10002/IMG_2369_800x533.JPG
    Self-critique - the tree kanga in the background is out of focus
    and would've liked them both sharper. Also thought it would've
    been better with the full tails included, but they were quite
    long and so I chose to get in on the bodies. Should've done it
    in portrait maybe.
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 15, 2007
    #1
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  2. Troy Piggins

    Rob Guest

    Troy

    My comments, they don't have enough impact, not sharp enough, flat in
    the colours.

    To me they look like happy snaps.

    Sorry

    http://tinyurl.com/2wf7hd

    taken with a D100

    r
     
    Rob, Aug 15, 2007
    #2
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  3. Troy Piggins

    Noons Guest

    that all?
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~nsouto/photos/calimero.jpg
    Astia 100, pentax 6x7 and sb-28.
    trust me: you do NOT want to see the full size
    5420X4340 original. Let's just say the blood vessels
    in the cornea are clearly defined...
    ;-)
     
    Noons, Aug 15, 2007
    #3
  4. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    * Rob is quoted & my replies are inline below :
    Thanks for the comments. I agree. I mentioned I wasn't happy
    with most of the shots. I am a beginner at photography, but I
    could still tell they didn't have the sort of appeal that I
    wanted.

    As for them not being sharp enough, I am finding that with most
    of my shots. I don't know if it's my inexperience (probably) or
    what. I can't get shots anywhere near as sharp as those I see
    here, in other NGs, or even on POTN etc. I was using centre
    point focus on the eyes, 1/500s 200mm f/2.8. I would've thought
    the whole head should be in focus and sharp?
    Those have more colour in the background than mine, and
    definitely sharper for the whole head. Shame some other emu
    stuck his bum in the bottom shot. No pun intended. Classic look
    with the blade of grass (?) in his mouth.
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 15, 2007
    #4
  5. Troy Piggins

    J Guest

    I had this same problem... some reasons I found..

    1. Camera Shake - MY major problem, I shake pretty bad at the best of times.
    I think the rule others use is that the shutter speed should be 3 x the Lens
    Focal length.
    ie. a 50mm lens shutter speed min = 1/150 sec - 200mm lens min = 1/600 sec

    2. Using the lens at max aperture - Only the most expensive lenses are
    really sharp at there maximum aperture.
    Stopping the lens down a little bit usually improves sharpness.

    3. Depth of Field - Remember at maximum aperture on a 200mm f2.8 the Depth
    of Field ( Depth of Focus)
    is pretty small, And the closer to the object you are the smaller it is.
     
    J, Aug 15, 2007
    #5
  6. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    * J is quoted & my replies are inline below :
    Hmm - I was working on a "rule of thumb" I had read where for
    full frame cameras the shutter speed should be
    1/(focal length of lens), so for 200mm lens, 1/200 shutter speed.

    My camera is a Canon 30D, which has a 1.6x crop factor sensor,
    and based on the above I have been assuming
    1/(focal length of lens x crop factor) should be the slowest
    shutter speed, so for 200mm lens, 1/(200x1.6) = 1/320 shutter
    speed.

    I wonder if I read something wrong?
    Thanks. I'll remember that. Hopefully.
    I just had a look at an online DOF calculator. I'm trying to
    remember how far away the emu was, I think 3m. At that range,
    200mm lens, and f/2.8 the DOF is only 20mm. That could be it?

    Thanks again for your help. I need it.
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 15, 2007
    #6
  7. Troy Piggins

    Rob Guest

    OK what camera, then what ISO, it hasn't missed the focal point so it
    maybe movement, both camera and emu, a suggestion that you boost up the
    ISO and even go to 1/1000th and f5.6. ( have you tried the lens at 2.8
    on a tripod focused on a news paper? what's the results?? just to
    eliminate the lens)
    Taken on a farm. The grass gave it a bit of character. Also enough room
    for editing, either crop or clone.

    What I think is important is separation of the subject matter, and the
    eyes being sharp, so you have eye contact.

    The images have been degraded by compression, about the 4th generation.
     
    Rob, Aug 15, 2007
    #7
  8. Troy Piggins

    D_Mac Guest

    DO you use Photoshop Troy?
    If not, there is a program called "Ultra sharpen" you might like to
    investigate. You might also care to study up on "levels" in Photoshop.
    Adjusting white, grey and black can "lift" a computer image
    substantially.

    BTW if you don't have Photoshop, you need to get it and then when you
    learn how to use it, your photos (which are as good as anyone else's)
    will look as good on a monitor too!
    I'm tempted to dose up one of your photos to show this but the last
    time someone did this to someone else's pic, it started a flame war.

    Regardless of how good a photographer you are or will be, any images
    offered on the Internet are not photographs and should be seen only as
    a facsimile of the actual photograph. Some people here like to keep it
    to themselves how you make a nice photo look stunning on a computer
    screen.

    There certainly is no secret to it. Decide for yourself (again) which
    you want to do. Noons picture of a dog is probably a stunning
    photograph but his method of preparing it for Internet display and
    presentation of the facsimile, let down what could be a truly stunning
    representation of the photograph.

    Doug
     
    D_Mac, Aug 15, 2007
    #8
  9. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    * Rob is quoted & my replies are inline below :
    Canon 30D, ISO 200. The EXIF info is in the image I posted.
    I have since looked at, roughly, how far away the emu was and
    with that focal length and aperture the DOF is only about 20mm.
    But silly on my part. Maybe that's it?
    I hadn't thought of the newspaper test. I've only had the gear
    for a month or so and have only just thought of doing some tests.
    I'll get onto that.

    On the morning we went to Currumbin I took some test shots with
    my 24-70, 70-200 with and without IS, and then the 70-200 with
    and without 1.4x and 2x extenders. I haven't had a chance to
    collate those into conclusions yet, other than to say that IS is
    way cool at those lengths :)
    It's all about the eyes as I've read.
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 16, 2007
    #9
  10. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    * D_Mac is quoted & my replies are inline below :
    G'day Doug.

    No. I use an open-source program called GIMP. I'm familiar with
    it, it's free, and I can use it on both my Windows and Linux
    computers.

    I also use the software that came with the camera - mostly
    Digital Photo Professional which I use to edit and convert the
    RAW files.
    Will do - googling it now.

    Does it do anything that DPP can't do?
    Understood - I'm still learning the taking photos end of the
    deal, let alone post-processing! :)
    No problems from my end. I'd appreciate seeing what some good PP
    can do. Just don't sell them for profit ;-)

    Is the 800x533 jpg enough? Do you require bigger or better
    format?
    I'll take and give any advice I can.
    I didn't understand what that post was about. It offered no
    assistance to me, and at least Rob's f-up was other emu
    headshots.

    Thanks for taking the time, Doug.
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 16, 2007
    #10
  11. Troy Piggins

    Annika1980 Guest

    The crop factor wouldn't enter into it.
    You are still really shooting at 200mm. A sharp pic at 200mm when
    cropped will still look sharp.
     
    Annika1980, Aug 16, 2007
    #11
  12. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    * Annika1980 is quoted & my replies are inline below :
    Ok, thanks for clarifying. So the 1/(focal length) is correct
    approximation?
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 16, 2007
    #12
  13. Troy Piggins

    Mr.T Guest

    Nope, but it's just a rule of thumb. It depends *highly* on the person
    holding the camera.
    Try a tripod for comparison shots of your own abilty.

    What crap, it is all about magnification. The longer the lens, the bigger
    the print, the bigger the crop factor, the more any slight blur will become
    apparent.
    What is acceptable is purely up to the photographers opinion of course.

    MrT.
     
    Mr.T, Aug 16, 2007
    #13
  14. Troy Piggins

    Rob Guest

    Have another thing about that!

    its the circle of coverage. 200mm is 200mm how does that alter?
     
    Rob, Aug 16, 2007
    #14
  15. Troy Piggins

    Troy Piggins Guest

    * Rob is quoted & my replies are inline below :
    Been reading this which may clarify:
    http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=45388
     
    Troy Piggins, Aug 16, 2007
    #15
  16. Troy Piggins

    PixelPix Guest

    Imagine the same composition in the view finder of a full frame camera
    (ie 5D/1Ds) and a 1.6x camera (ie 30D) The 30D captures the image on
    a smaller sensor (ie a smaller area)

    Now print both these images at the same size. The 1.6x image needs to
    be enlarged more and this enlargement also enlarges and blur/movement
    that was captured. Hence a shutter speed of 1.6x the focal length is
    preferred when shooting with a 1.6x camera.

    So yes the 200mm stays 200mm and the image circle it projects is the
    same, but we use a smaller portion of it and enlarge more.

    It also means that we need to adjust subject distance to get the same
    composition in the view finder.

    Cheers

    Rusty
     
    PixelPix, Aug 16, 2007
    #16
  17. Troy Piggins

    Mr.T Guest

    I suggest you think about it instead.
    It all depends on the magnification of the FINAL image as viewed.

    MrT.
     
    Mr.T, Aug 16, 2007
    #17
  18. Troy Piggins

    Rob Guest

    That "thing" was a typo :)
     
    Rob, Aug 16, 2007
    #18
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