Some questions on Lense and Filters for Film SLR

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by xtiva, Jan 17, 2004.

  1. xtiva

    xtiva Guest

    Hi there,

    I have a Canon 300V (Rebel Ti) film camera body and BP-220 Battery Pack and
    also the cable release. After research I will need a Tripod and Cable
    release for Night Photography. I bought camera primariry for taking
    Landscape and Architecural photo.

    And have 2 lenses, a 28-90mm non-USM canon Lense and a 90-300 USM f4.5-5.6
    Canon Lense.

    My question is because I only have limited resources..I can only get one
    more lense.
    Reading this NG and on the internet I will need a 50mm lense and for
    landscape and architecure photography I also need wide angle lense, a 20 and
    28mm lense... But what would be the best for me? 50mm f1.8 Canon lense or
    wide angle zoom lense.. like
    Tamron Zoom Super Wide Angle SP AF 17-35mm f/2.8-4 Di LD Aspherical IF
    lense.
    or
    Canon Zoom Super Wide Angle EF 20-35mm f/3.5-4.5 USM?

    Second question is I want to take picture inside of the Windows and take
    night landscape picture... What filter should I get? I have Sky 1B and UV
    clear filter...

    Thirdly..my friend told me to get Fuji film for landscape photo as Kodak's
    Red is too strong...is that true? If true what professional film should I
    get from Fuji?

    Your kind and professional advise is greately appreciated.

    Thanks.

    --
    Regards
    Shin

    Please Remove NOSPAM at the end
    to reply directly to me.
     
    xtiva, Jan 17, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Start with what you have. The 28-90 will do a good job to start. After
    you have worked with it for a while, then you will have a better idea of
    what YOU want. That may well not be what I would want of what someone else
    might want.

    It is not the equipment that makes the photographer, but rather the
    photographer chooses his tools.
    None. Well you may want a polarizing filter for the windows IF you
    find reflections a problem or if you want stronger reflections that you get
    without one. The polarizer can reduce or increase reflections from glass.

    You MAY want some form of color correction filter for those windows, but
    that depends on what results you want and what kind of lights are inside.

    You MAY want some sort of color correction filter for the night
    landscapes as well, but again that will depend on the results you want, the
    film used and the leingth of the exposure you are using.

    Start working and see what YOU want. Photography is an art that must be
    learned but doing, not by following along behind someone else.
    Fuji is fine film as is Kodak. Both make a number of very different
    films. So try the Fuji that was recommended and see if you like it. If you
    do, use it to get some experience under your belt and then consider other
    films.
     
    Joseph Meehan, Jan 17, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. xtiva

    Deathwalker Guest

    The biggest advantages of the 50mm prime are
    1. same magnification as the human eye but not the width of view as we have
    two eyes.
    2. quality for price It is a prime lense (not a zoom) therfore optically far
    easier to make and though priced as a bargain lense is very good.
    3. Far faster than your zoom. I believe the 28-90 zoom is 4.5 at the wide
    end or maybe 3.5. However even the cheapest 50mm is 2.8 and the better ones
    are 1.8. This means you can hand hold in lower light than with the zoom.
     
    Deathwalker, Jan 17, 2004
    #3
  4. xtiva

    stan Guest

    You already have a 50mm built into the zoom. Why buy another if money is a
    problem. If you want to do architectural work a 20mm will probably be your last
    choice. The distortion is great for some things but I wouldn't use one for
    architectural work. I have always been a great fan of the 20mm for landscape
    (I'm ot a landscape shooter by trade). It has a wonderful depth and range that I
    really like. I would go for a wide angle zoom. Can't recommend one because I've
    never owned one.
    You won't need a filter. Get your camera as close to the glass as possible. If
    you can, use a rubber lens hood and mush it against the glass. This eliminates
    reflections from other sources. I use tungsten film at night and shoot a bit
    earlier than total darkness. This makes the sky darker than normal. Give it a
    try.
    I have been a Fuji fan for a LONG time. You probably don't need pro film. Get a
    couple rolls of any film and shoot it. My taste and your taste will differ.
    Experiment is the key with film. Even under and over exposing. You can get a lot
    of info from one 36 shot roll.
    Stan
    Visual Arts Photography
     
    stan, Jan 17, 2004
    #4
  5. How much and what type of night photography may influence your choices here?
    You may have what you need. You may need a flash. You may want to get a
    higher speed zoom.
    You may want to skip on the exotics for a while... and I would definatly
    consider those exotics. You may want to instead invest in a film scanner to
    avoid paying for prints ($1.50 at Sams Club to develope 36 exposure film
    without prints). This may help extend your budget a bit. Just a thought.
    Maybe a circular polarizer. I would try with what you have first, then if
    needed buy a Circular Polarizer (note, on this, the cheaper ones do have a
    visible diference).
    You may also want to try Agfa (Vista and Ultra are very nice), depending on
    whats cheap near you. You can see a noticible diffecnce with good film. You
    will want to try a lot, and then take what works for you. This is the place
    to wast money. By far.
    Have fun Shin!

    Robert Meyers
     
    Robert Meyers, Jan 17, 2004
    #5
  6. How much and what type of night photography may influence your choices here?
    You may have what you need. You may need a flash. You may want to get a
    higher speed zoom.
    You may want to skip on the exotics for a while... and I would definatly
    consider those exotics. You may want to instead invest in a film scanner to
    avoid paying for prints ($1.50 at Sams Club to develope 36 exposure film
    without prints). This may help extend your budget a bit. Just a thought.
    Maybe a circular polarizer. I would try with what you have first, then if
    needed buy a Circular Polarizer (note, on this, the cheaper ones do have a
    visible diference).
    You may also want to try Agfa (Vista and Ultra are very nice), depending on
    whats cheap near you. You can see a noticible diffecnce with good film. You
    will want to try a lot, and then take what works for you. This is the place
    to wast money. By far.
    Have fun Shin!

    Robert Meyers
     
    Robert Meyers, Jan 17, 2004
    #6
  7. xtiva

    xtiva Guest

    Thanks very much for the tips...

    I have only had SLR for about a month and was hoping to get the hang of it
    too quickly.
    I will take your advise and will try to take many photos...:)



    --
    Regards
    Shin

    Please Remove NOSPAM at the end
    to reply directly to me.
     
    xtiva, Jan 18, 2004
    #7
  8. xtiva

    xtiva Guest

    Thanks for the reply...:)



    --
    Regards
    Shin

    Please Remove NOSPAM at the end
    to reply directly to me.
     
    xtiva, Jan 18, 2004
    #8
  9. xtiva

    xtiva Guest

    Thank you for your great tip.

    Good news to hear that I would only need 1 more lense...:)

    By the way do you have website that you put your photo on?

    Thanks.

    --
    Regards
    Shin

    Please Remove NOSPAM at the end
    to reply directly to me.
     
    xtiva, Jan 18, 2004
    #9
  10. xtiva

    stan Guest

    I do not. I have not seen the advantage of having one. I do have a "light box"
    for clients to view images when necessary. I have played with the idea of
    setting one up and may do so in the future but too busy to do it.
    Stan
    Visual Arts Photography
     
    stan, Jan 18, 2004
    #10
  11. xtiva

    xtiva Guest

    Thanks for your tip...

    I went out for the night photography for the first time...:)
    Was son enjoyable first used Bulb coz didn't know my camera had
    shutter speed of more than a sec... anyway after finding that out i
    used self-timer with 3, 6, 10, 15 sec for the photo..just waiting to
    get the developed photo..

    I can now understand that I need to take more picture..I think I
    learnt quiet few yesterday...:)
    Yeah I think I can skip that and decided to get nice tripod like
    Manfrotto.. mine seems to be a little shaky..at the quick release
    plate...

    Don't know if this is better choice..but I thought 28 mm was just
    ok..Would be good if I have wider lense..but I think I can manage
    without it..but not without Tripod...

    I have a cheapish..Epson 1650P film scanner.. hope this is enough for
    the time being...:)
     
    xtiva, Jan 19, 2004
    #11
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.