[Sony A65] A lense for closer distances indoors than the SAL18135

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Harry Putnam, Apr 8, 2013.

  1. Harry Putnam

    Harry Putnam Guest

    Note: This message is a repost of a message I posted on the Dpreview
    (www.dpreview.com) forum for Sony A65 cameras. I see no way to access
    that forum as nntp protocol so thought I'd try this forum too. I much
    prefer discusions with newsgroup (nntp) access.

    Please bear with my dialog for a moment:

    (The A65 camera is one of Sony's Translucent mirror style cameras)

    The kit lense I got with my A65 (SAL18135) is not able to shoot well
    indoors unless in a cathedral or gymnasium. Trying to use it, for
    example, to record the look of every room in a house for sale, is not
    working out.

    Even when telescoped tight into the camera at its closest it is only
    able to resolve a smallish portion of say, a bedroom.

    But more often, its a problem when trying to shoot people indoors in
    regular houses.

    (I realize this camera has a panorama function that would allow me to
    capture a whole room at once but it requires some messing about that
    I'd prefer not to have to do.)

    I need a lens that captures a fuller array of objects within 5 or a
    bit farther feet of me.

    I'm way to much the amateur, and these lenses are way to expensive for
    me to just jump out and try something else. Also reading specs on
    lenses is singularly useless until I gather enough experience to know
    what any of it means.

    ===================================

    In short, can I get some advice on lenses to do the type of tasks
    mentioned above?

    I'd like to stay in at least a similar quality range as the kit lens
    mentioned, and not go crazy on price. But also a lens that will be
    useful in a wide range of applications but still good for the jobs
    described... like shooting several people in a 12x12 room, not
    necessarily grouped.
     
    Harry Putnam, Apr 8, 2013
    #1
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  2. Harry Putnam

    dadiOH Guest

    For what you want to do you need a lens with a shorter focal length; that
    will give you a wider field of view.

    B&H says the lens 18-135mm lens you have is equivalent to 27-202.5mm on a
    35mm camera. That is wide but not super wide; the next 35mm step wider is
    generally 24mm which would be 16mm in digital speak. You can get even wider
    lenses but they aren't going to be cheap. Also, keep in mind the
    "distortion" from wide angle lenses (close objects will seem insanely
    large).

    Here's a bunch of wider lenses.
    http://www.dyxum.com/lenses/results.asp?IDLensType=3&offset=0
    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

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    dadiOH, Apr 8, 2013
    #2
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  3. Harry Putnam

    dadiOH Guest

    To clarify, the 27 (18)mm setting is wide. The 202.5 (135)mm is not...it is
    about 4X the normal focal length and enables one to make distant objects
    larger.

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    Winters getting colder? Tired of the rat race?
    Taxes out of hand? Maybe just ready for a change?
    Check it out... http://www.floridaloghouse.net
     
    dadiOH, Apr 8, 2013
    #3
  4. Harry Putnam

    Whiskers Guest

    [...]
    If the 16mm wide-angle setting on your lens is not sufficiently wide-angle
    for your purposes, you'll need what Sony call a "super-wide-angle" lens -
    with a focal length of about 10mm.

    But super-wide-angle lenses are tricky to use without getting very
    odd-looking results near the edge of the picture, and they usually need
    more light than less extreme lenses of a similar price and quality.

    Are you sure that you're using the "widest" zoom setting on your existing
    lens?
     
    Whiskers, Apr 8, 2013
    #4
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