Sony or Canon

Discussion in 'Sony' started by Samantha Booth, Dec 9, 2008.

  1. I am a beginner to camera and currently have a Canon G9. I want to get into
    DSLR and have about £450 to spend and have narrowed it down to either the
    Sony A200K or the Canon 450d.

    I would appreciate your view on it please
     
    Samantha Booth, Dec 9, 2008
    #1
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  2. Samantha Booth

    ray Guest

    You said you would appreciate my view, so here it is. 1) I eschew
    everything canon - but probably not for a reason that matters to you. 2)
    there is one distinct advantage to the Sony Alpha line - built in anit-
    shake so you don't have to worry about having same in every lens you buy.

    As another poster suggested it is a great idea to handle whatever you are
    thinking of buying. See how it fits you - run through some of the menus
    and see if they make sense to you. You will probably have this camera for
    some time. Try to objectively categorize the things you don't like about
    each one. Some of them will be minor annoyances you can live with - others
    will bug you every time you turn the camera on - those you want to
    minimize.
     
    ray, Dec 9, 2008
    #2
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  3. Samantha Booth

    ASAAR Guest

    Most DSLR users will never reach their camera's limits either, if
    you're referring to all of the camera's capabilities. Your
    assessment may be correct, but it may also be incorrect if the OP is
    frustrated by having reached some of the G9's limits, and it does
    have them, as do all cameras. A number of advanced amateurs and
    pros use DSLRs as well as P&S cameras such as the G9, G10, F31,
    SD770 etc. and continue using all of them, and being aware of their
    limits, choose which to use as common sense dictates.
     
    ASAAR, Dec 9, 2008
    #3
  4. Samantha Booth

    Jurgen Guest

    The Canon would have a greater resale value and does take some nice
    photos but the kit lens they supply is little better than the bottom of
    a wine bottle. You'd soon be looking for a replacement lens.

    Sony are basically Minolta cameras and have quite good quality kit
    lenses. I'd think this would be a good choice if you remembered they
    don't work as well as the Canon in very low light and you'd need to
    brush up on flash use. (still better than your G9)

    Another alternative you might look at is a D60 Nikon. These have very
    good resale value and also come with good quality lenses. They are very
    suitable for smaller hand and have some nifty features that let you get
    really nice results - once you learn about them.

    There is also Olympus to consider. These have Panasonic sensors which
    are a little noisy at low light scenes but they have the best quality
    kit lenses. They have very little resale value.

    So.
    If you keep in mind that in a year or two you may want to upgrade your
    camera, the Canon will give you a greater price second hand.

    The Nikon is close to the Canon but it's interface and menu system is
    confusing. The Nikon will produce better outdoor shots than the Canon
    and they will be sharper pictures.

    The Olympus is a mixed bag. Plenty of people love their Olympus DSLRs. I
    had one a few years ago and found it a love / hate relationship. When I
    sold it 12 months later, I lost 60% of it's value. No one wanted it.

    I've had Canon and Nikon DSLRs and found selling used Canon's to be the
    easiest and least loss. I haven't ever sold a Nikon, which I am firmly
    devoted to as a loyal customer.

    Feel which one "fits" your hand. Decide if the resale value is
    important or not. All three will take good photos. The Olympus is best
    in shaded or overcast days. The Canon at high ISO speeds and the Nikon
    outside although they do pretty well inside too!

    If I disappointed with little being said about the Sony, it is because I
    don't believe Sony are anything but a hyped up marketing company when it
    comes to consumer good. Their Professional stuff is beyond reproach but
    their consumer goods are built to die early.

    I hope this help you and anyone else looking for their first DSLR.
     
    Jurgen, Dec 9, 2008
    #4
  5. Sorry I dint fully understand this. Are you saying the Canon and Sony are
    not as good as the G9?
     
    Samantha Booth, Dec 9, 2008
    #5
  6. Why did you choose these two DSLRs?
    --

    Alfred Molon
    ------------------------------
    Olympus 50X0, 8080, E3X0, E4X0, E5X0 and E3 forum at
    http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/MyOlympus/
    http://myolympus.org/ photo sharing site

    They were suggested to me and also were recently reviewed on the gadget Show
    as being the best two in this price bracket for the money

    http://fwd.five.tv/gadget-show/bestbuys/slr-cameras
     
    Samantha Booth, Dec 9, 2008
    #6
  7. Is there an AUTO mode on the Nicon until I get used to the settings. I think
    now the Sony is out and its between the Canon and the Nicon, especially when
    I take into account resale. I am just wondering if either of them are as
    good at taking photos as my G9 is in view of what was said earlier. I love
    the G9 just wanted a chpice of zoom lenses in a camera and real clear
    pictures. The G9 is clear but not brilliant in low light.
     
    Samantha Booth, Dec 9, 2008
    #7
  8. Samantha Booth

    Jurgen Guest

    It's commonly referred to as "idiot mode" by the geeks. In reality it is
    called "scene" mode. There is a little green square on the settings dial
    that is basically an auto pilot.

    If you spend a few minutes reading the manual, you can also set it 'fix'
    any highlight issues you might get too. Nearly all entry level and many
    mid range DSLRs have the "green box" as a selection for a shooting modes.

    If you do decide on the Nikon, you can get a deal with an 18 - 200 lens
    and that will fill about 95% of your needs - all of them initially.
     
    Jurgen, Dec 9, 2008
    #8
  9. This is utter rubbish!
     
    Malcolm Smith, Dec 10, 2008
    #9
  10. Samantha Booth

    Mark Thomas Guest

    Yes, *if* the noise levels are an issue. But if you check the
    performance of the later 4/3 sensors, you'll see they are a lot closer
    to APS-C than they are to any p&s:
    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympuse420/page16.asp
    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/olympuse420/page28.asp

    The good thing about the Olympus has always been the quality of the two
    kit lenses. The twin lens kit is very capable and very good value.

    Having said that, I would probably go Sony, as I'm not a Canon/Nikon
    sort of person. They are all very comparable, and you won't be buying a
    bad camera. So whatever feels good in your hand..
     
    Mark Thomas, Dec 10, 2008
    #10
  11. Samantha Booth

    ASAAR Guest

    Wow, you're almost sounding like SMS with his "mandatory"
    reommendations. DX DSLRs have also noise bounded resolution growth
    compared with FX DSLRs. The bigoted anti-Olympus_4/3 techno-weenies
    have been spouting this nonsense for years, and just as the Canon
    and Nikon DX DSLRs have been steadily improving over the years, so
    have the Olympus DSLRs. Perhaps you should complain to DPR, who
    said in their recent Canon 450D review :
     
    ASAAR, Dec 10, 2008
    #11
  12. Samantha Booth

    DRS Guest

    [...]
    That is true. The original 18-55 was junk. The 18-55 IS is a vast
    improvement for only a little extra money and is respectable for a kit lens.
    However, the OP needs to be aware that both are still offered with various
    Canon packages and it is easy to get them confused.
     
    DRS, Dec 10, 2008
    #12
  13. Samantha Booth

    Ray Fischer Guest

    That's patent bullshit, of course. The kit lens isn't excellent but
    it's capable.
     
    Ray Fischer, Dec 10, 2008
    #13
  14. Samantha Booth

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Given a choice between those two I'd pick the Canon. There are many more
    lenses to choose from.
     
    Ray Fischer, Dec 10, 2008
    #14
  15. Samantha Booth

    Mark Thomas Guest

    As already pointed out, the old 18-55 is a bit of a dog. The new IS
    version is much improved but the old one is still out there, ready to
    bark at the unwary..
     
    Mark Thomas, Dec 10, 2008
    #15
  16. Samantha Booth

    Pete D Guest

    Actually it is not called "scene" mode, the little pictures of "scenes" are
    the scene modes. It is the full auto mode.
     
    Pete D, Dec 10, 2008
    #16
  17. "David J Taylor"
    David

    Can you point me to the Nicon and the lens your wife has please. I think its
    a toss up between this and the canon although I still dont know if the two
    will be better than the G9 I already have.

    Do they do a lense whereas I can zoon in real well for long distances and do
    close up portrait shits too. is this available for either camera in one
    lense. Sorry if its a dumb question I just dont know Sorry
     
    Samantha Booth, Dec 10, 2008
    #17
  18. Samantha Booth

    J. Clarke Guest

    That's not necessarily so any longer. The newest 18-55 IS from Canon
    is optically a surprisingly good lens that does a credible job even on
    the 50D. Mechanically it's pretty much what you'd expect for a 150
    buck lens.
    Yep. Best advice. Take an SD card and a CF and take some shots and
    take them home and examine them at your leisure.
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 10, 2008
    #18
  19. Samantha Booth

    J. Clarke Guest

    He said it was a D60 with the 18-200 zoom. Nikon doesn't package that
    particular set as a kit--you'd have to get a D60 body and the lens
    separately.

    That would be
    http://nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon/Product/Digital-SLR/25438/D60.html
    with
    http://nikonusa.com/Find-Your-Nikon...VR-Zoom-NIKKOR-18-200mm-f/3.5-5.6G-IF-ED.html.

    The Canon equivalent would be
    http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelInfoAct&fcategoryid=139&modelid=16307
    (note that you can get the body without the lens even though it's not
    shown on the Web site--note that there is also a cheaper model but it
    is generally agreed that the cheaper model is not good value) with
    http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=ModelInfoAct&fcategoryid=149&modelid=17518.

    The Sony would be I believe
    http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs...10151&langId=-1&productId=8198552921665345641
    (there's a cheaper model but it's not feature-equivalent to the Canon
    or Nikon) with
    http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs...51&storeId=10151&langId=-1&productId=11040385.

    For any of these cameras you can also get 18-200mm lenses from Sigma
    or Tamron for less money but at a sacrifice of performance. Tamron
    also has an 18-270 which takes the zoom range out even farther.
     
    J. Clarke, Dec 10, 2008
    #19
  20. Can you point me towards the 450d with the good lense please. I will have a
    serious look at this. My friend has the 450 he tells me but I havent seen it
    yet but he swears by it and uses it weekly in the lakes. He has taken some
    real good shots with it. A web address would be handy for the 450 with lens
     
    Samantha Booth, Dec 10, 2008
    #20
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