Sony to ax 10,000 jobs in turnaround bid: Nikkei - (via Reuters)

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Bruce, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. [/QUOTE]
    .... some months or years ago.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, May 3, 2012
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  2. Bruce

    Guest Guest

    no you don't. you only need a router that implements wake on demand,
    which apple airport routers do.

    as for locking it down, that is a separate issue and presumably if you
    can access your computers from the outside, you have good security in
    place.
     
    Guest, May 3, 2012
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  3. Bruce

    Mxsmanic Guest

    Not everything is a tool. A painting is not a tool. A song is not a tool. A
    book may or may not be a tool.
    The alphabet is indeed a tool, except perhaps for calligraphers.
    Tungsten lamps provide a full blackbody spectrum that some people prefer. They
    may also prefer the "warmer" (more reddish) light that they produce, as
    compared to many fluorescent phosphor blends.
    Few tungsten lamps last more than a few hundred hours. Tungsten-halogen lamps
    have a longer life than ordinary incandescent lamps as long as they are
    operated at the proper temperature and in the proper position.
    See my previous comments above.

    I use CFL now, to save electricity and heat, and because I like the higher
    approximate color temperature of fluorescent lamps.
    I imagine it varies, but the power cycle is surely much longer for CFL than
    for incandescents.
    Each lamp type has its uses, no matter what European bureaucrats think.
    Why not?
    It saves on their electric bill, but it doesn't necessarily save power or
    money overall. But if they are in Europe, they aren't given a choice, anyway.
    Rapid cycling wouldn't produce thermal shocks that might shorten life.
     
    Mxsmanic, May 4, 2012
  4. Bruce

    Mxsmanic Guest

    5000 hours with normal power cycling. With no power cycling, the lifetime
    could be far longer. And if the lamp is infrequently used, 5000 hours of
    operation could last a long time.
     
    Mxsmanic, May 4, 2012
  5. I don't keep my lights on 24/7. I have a total of 8 in my lounge/diner
    and expect to change one or two each year.
     
    C. Neil Ellwood, May 4, 2012
  6. I'd say the same for paintings and songs.
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, May 4, 2012
  7. Bruce

    Whisky-dave Guest

    What's normal power cycling.....

    Then again like you do with a PC I thought you left everything on
    even when you go to bed/sleep.

    As with a lot ofg things not using them cam make them last longer.
    Or if switched off an on too often can shorten the lifespan.
    So in order to save money and electricity it takes a little more
    understanding than just reading
    govenment or manufacters specs.
     
    Whisky-dave, May 4, 2012
  8. Bruce

    Whisky-dave Guest

    It seems some think of everythingas a tool and I'm not sure how that
    helps
    describe or explain anything.
     
    Whisky-dave, May 4, 2012
  9. Bruce

    Alan Browne Guest

    It describes when a thread has gone to the point of uselessness to mankind.
     
    Alan Browne, May 4, 2012
  10. Bruce

    Mxsmanic Guest

    You'd have to ask the manufacturer what assumptions it made.
    I leave the computers running most of the time, particularly the server which
    must not be turned off. There is usually at least one light on in the
    apartment, often two, whether I'm awake or asleep, although I do turn the
    lights off if I leave the apartment. I don't cycle the desktop unless I am
    certain that I will not use it all day (as when working). If the system will
    not be used for more than a couple of hours, I turn off the monitor (it is set
    to go off on its own after 2 hours of inactivity).
     
    Mxsmanic, May 4, 2012
  11. Bruce

    Trevor Guest

    }Or if switched off an on too often can shorten the lifespan.

    If it is never switched on it will last longer than if it is left on
    permanently, Guranteed! :)

    Trevor.
     
    Trevor, May 4, 2012
  12. Big Scientists have found that routers are, indeed,
    computers.
    Could you *try* to read what I wrote? Your paragraph is
    completely irrelevant to the problem.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, May 5, 2012
  13. Bruce

    Guest Guest

    you know quite well what is meant by 'computer'.
    how is it irrelevant? you said you don't want j random packet to wake
    your computer. with the proper security, that won't happen.
     
    Guest, May 5, 2012
  14. Bruce

    Mxsmanic Guest

    That's the key: How long will a device actually last before it fails or before
    you need to replace it? Unfortunately, that doesn't equate to the total number
    of operating hours, unless you never turn it off.

    With lots of gadgets, the more you turn them on and off, the fewer hours of
    operation they will provide before they fail. But the total time you'll have
    the gadget is the sum of operating hours plus hours during which the gadget is
    not in use. So the trick is to determine the frequency of power cycling at
    which the total of operating hours plus non-operating hours is greatest.

    Unfortunately, that's a difficult determination to make. Manufacturers often
    don't even bother, and even when they do, unless their test assumptions match
    an acceptable pattern of use for end users, their conclusions are not
    necessarily useful.

    I've never seen a study that provides any useful conclusions for computers,
    electric lamps, fans, disk drives, or displays (TV or computer monitors).
    Extreme tests give expected results (turning the TV on and off a hundred times
    a day definitely reduces life), but anything approaching normal use leaves a
    gray area too large to be useful.

    I think ultimately the solution is to build things that are so reliable that
    it doesn't really matter how you use them, as they will last longer than
    you're ever likely to keep them in any case. This goal is gradually being
    approached in some domains, especially for devices that have no moving parts.

    I've had lots of electronic gadgets that I stopped using long before they
    failed. I've had similar luck with one or two computers, particularly an
    old-school HP computer that would still be in use if software bloat had not
    made it obsolete (current HP computers are throwaway garbage). I'd like very
    much for all my computers and monitors to last forever.
     
    Mxsmanic, May 5, 2012
  15. The general domestic lighting tungsten lamps that are sold in the UK
    are rated for 1,000 hours, and most of them certainly last a lot
    longer than a few hundred hours. The life of a tungsten filament lamp
    depends on the temperature it's run at. You can buy lower temp longer
    lasting lamps rated at 3,000 or more hours, you can buy high temp
    photographic tungsten lamps rated at less than a hundred. You can also
    buy tungsten lamps rated for a higher voltage than your domestric
    supply, e.g. 250V when you have a 235V supply, and they'll last a lot
    longer than they're rated.
     
    Chris Malcolm, May 5, 2012
  16. And as can easily be seen they're running at much lower temperatures
    than modern tungsten bulbs, which is why they're been running so long.
     
    Chris Malcolm, May 5, 2012
  17. I don't know what you mean by 'computer'. I know quite well
    what I mean by it. And a router, CPU, RAM, permanent storage,
    IO and all is one.

    So how would you implement that security? It cannot be implemented
    in the computer, since it's sleeping. It has to be implemented
    in another computer.

    Additionally, tasks running automatically (especially backups)
    need the computer to be awake at the times when the tasks are to
    be performed.

    -Wolfgang
     
    Wolfgang Weisselberg, May 5, 2012
  18. Bruce

    Savageduck Guest

    Abacus?
    The original "wake on demand" computer, 100% zero power draw.
     
    Savageduck, May 5, 2012
  19. Bruce

    Alan Browne Guest

    Still took energy to move the beads. That takes food. Food needs
    sunshine to grow (or to grow and feed other food). Sunshine is fusion
    energy.

    So, abacus' run on fusion energy. Quite sophisticated, n'est pas?
     
    Alan Browne, May 5, 2012
  20. Bruce

    Guest Guest

    the router is a proxy and wakes the computer if needed.
     
    Guest, May 6, 2012
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