Sony's a7, most expensive plastic-bodied camera yet

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by RichA, Feb 17, 2014.

  1. RichA

    RichA Guest

    $1700 and it's plastic!! I can't figure out why either. Even their mid-level, $700 NEX cameras had/have metal bodies. There are other weird differences between it and the a7R such as focusing and lack of sensor cleaning and the AA filters. In addition, they dropped the "NEX" nomenclature in order to go with the far less interesting "a" designation.
     
    RichA, Feb 17, 2014
    #1
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  2. RichA

    Robert Coe Guest

    : $1700 and it's plastic!! I can't figure out why either. Even their mid-level,
    : $700 NEX cameras had/have metal bodies. There are other weird differences
    : between it and the a7R such as focusing and lack of sensor cleaning and the
    : AA filters. In addition, they dropped the "NEX" nomenclature in order to go
    : with the far less interesting "a" designation.

    You're fighting a losing battle against plastic, Rich. I assume you're aware
    that you can now fly across the Pacific Ocean in a plastic airplane.

    And just to satisfy my curiosity, in what way was the "NEX" designation
    interesting?

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Feb 17, 2014
    #2
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  3. RichA

    J. Clarke Guest

    It depends on the part of the engine. Fan and compressor blades are
    often plastic in modern engines. Turbine blades not so much. The hot-
    section stators are often ceramic and GE is trying ceramic blades in the
    first-stage turbine on the F414.
    It has another interesting property. Above a certain temperature it
    melts. Turbine blades already require active cooling to avoid this.
    Ceramics are capable of higher operating temperatures than metals.
    Since turbine inlet temperature is one of the controlling factors
    governing the efficiency of gas turbine engines and since modern jet
    engines operate near the limit of what the best metals can withstand,
    there is a need for higher-temperature materials.
     
    J. Clarke, Feb 17, 2014
    #3
  4. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Because it was different, not the usual boring letter-number classification.
     
    RichA, Feb 17, 2014
    #4
  5. RichA

    RichA Guest

    Cermamics though can be brittle, not capable of sustaining a hit that metalcan without shattering. Turbine blades hit by small debris might survive if metal but might shatter if ceramic.
     
    RichA, Feb 17, 2014
    #5
  6. RichA

    Me Guest

    So you know what nex means in latin?
    I think the was probably a secret joke, suggested by the last person
    there who had a clue about photography, an ex-minolta employee, as a
    parting gift.
     
    Me, Feb 18, 2014
    #6
  7. RichA

    Sandman Guest

    "NEX 5" isn't a "letter-number" classification? I suppose in the same way
    the Nikon D800E isn't a "letter-number" classification...
     
    Sandman, Feb 18, 2014
    #7
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