Still getting spots!!

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by CBlood59, Jul 16, 2003.

  1. CBlood59

    CBlood59 Guest

    Hello,

    I posted a couple of weeks ago about Fuji Acros 100. The problem was spotty
    negatives (airbells). Well I took the advice offered, which was to make sure
    to agitate during the pre-soak, and the spotty negatives persist. Could it be
    that I have a bad batch of film. The film is 120 Fuji Neopan Acros 100. Three
    minute pre-soak. Developer: D76 1:1 per instructions of film box. Stop bath.
    Ilford rapid fixer 4 minutes.

    Curt Blood
     
    CBlood59, Jul 16, 2003
    #1
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  2. I'll take a guess it is your water. You say you are using D-76 1:1, so I take
    it you are diluting just before use. The water you are using for dilution may
    have a lot of dissolved air in it. If you let a glass of tap water sit do you
    get little bubbles on the side of the glass?

    Boiling the water will drive the gas out. Boil it, let it cool and keep it
    a bottle/jug for use at the next developing session. I boil water 1 qt.
    at a time in a Pyrex jug in the microwave.

    You may want to make up your stock D-76 using boiled water. Gas in the water
    shortens developer life.

    An alternative is to use distilled water. At $0.69 a gallon it is pretty cheap
    when considering the cost of a gallon of developer. I use distilled for all my
    film developing, not because of gas, but because of the variability and general
    cruddiness of Cleveland water.
     
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Jul 16, 2003
    #2
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  3. CBlood59

    CBlood59 Guest

    << Subject: Re: Still getting spots!!
    From: "Nicholas O. Lindan"
    Date: Wed, Jul 16, 2003 10:13 AM
    Message-id: <bf3mk7$dbf$>

    I'll take a guess it is your water. You say you are using D-76 1:1, so I take
    it you are diluting just before use. The water you are using for dilution may
    have a lot of dissolved air in it. If you let a glass of tap water sit do you
    get little bubbles on the side of the glass?

    Boiling the water will drive the gas out. Boil it, let it cool and keep it
    a bottle/jug for use at the next developing session. I boil water 1 qt.
    at a time in a Pyrex jug in the microwave.

    You may want to make up your stock D-76 using boiled water. Gas in the water
    shortens developer life.

    An alternative is to use distilled water. At $0.69 a gallon it is pretty cheap
    when considering the cost of a gallon of developer. I use distilled for all my
    film developing, not because of gas, but because of the variability and general
    cruddiness of Cleveland water.

    --
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
    Consulting Engineer: Electronics; Informatics; Photonics.






    I might agree with you, except that I don't have trouble with Tri-X or Plus-X.
    Is it possible that the tape which holds the paper backing onto the film is
    causing this? I tear the paper off, instead of cutting the film past the tape.
     
    CBlood59, Jul 16, 2003
    #3
  4. CBlood59

    Jim Phelps Guest

    Curt,

    One thing you may try is putting two or three drops of wetting agent
    (Photo-Flo, etc) in the developer. I do this with almost all my developers
    used in a tank (even Technidol). Doesn't change the process at all, and
    reduces the surface tension enough to prevent problems like this. You still
    should make sure you tap the tank unless you are using a motor of some type.

    Jim



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    Jim Phelps, Jul 17, 2003
    #4
  5. If you're using an inversion type tank, immediately after agitation,
    rap the bottom edge of the tank, smartly, a couple of time on the
    counter. This should dislodge the air bells.

    Also, you may be agitating too vigorously, creating too many air
    bubbles. 3 inversions in 5 seconds with a quarter turn between each
    inversion should be sufficient.
     
    Stefan Patric, Jul 17, 2003
    #5
  6. What do these spots look like? They may not be air bells.
    Pre-soaks by themselves tend to eliminate air bells as does
    a couple of hard whacks on the tank after putting the film
    in.
    Air bells generally have a dark ring around them and a
    clear center. The ring is from the lack of reaction products
    right at the border of the bubble. While air bells don't
    always have this ring it is typical of them.
    I am suspicious this is something else.
     
    Richard Knoppow, Jul 24, 2003
    #6
  7. CBlood59

    Rick Guest

    I had a persistent problem with Plus-X, mostly in 35mm, developed in D76, in
    Jobo tanks. This was a known problem that both Richard Johnson (former
    head of BW technical assistance at EK) and Jobo acknowledged. The "new"
    Plus has reduced but no completely eliminated the problem, which only seems
    to occur in the Jobo 1500 tank system using hand agitation. The problem is
    emulsion voids, very similiar in appearance but not identical to air bells.
    The emulsion voids tended to occur more in the middle 50% of the negative,
    would look like dark spots agains a light background.

    Perhaps this problem is occuring for you. I have no real absolute cure.
    One idea is to put a drop of LFN for each 16oz of developeing solution.

    Rick Schiller
     
    Rick, Jul 25, 2003
    #7
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