Suggestions for photo ideas?

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by K W Hart, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. K W Hart

    K W Hart Guest

    So, I've got this lens- a 1200mm Canon. It's a pretty piece of glass, but I
    haven't come up with any ideas of what to use it for.

    So far, I've got two nice shots: one is a beautiful picture of the moon
    (nearly full) where the moon fills a major portion of the 35mm frame. The
    other is a picture of a courthouse clock tower taken from 1/2 mile away. I
    wasn't able to get the entire tower in frame, only the clock and part of the
    cupola. I thought of shooting a sunset, but (a) the sun fills the width of
    the frame and (b) I thought that might be dangerous, either to my sight or
    the camera's shutter.

    Sports pics are out, as the the lens must be tripod mounted (it's 3.5 feet
    long), so following the action would be difficultt at best.

    Basically, you cannot clearly see with the naked eye what the lens will see-
    it's a 24 power magnification. The setup time and effort requires that a
    stationary subject and some pre-planning.

    I'm in a rural area; the nearest building over three stories tall is over
    sixty miles away, so cityscapes are out. I'm also not a heights-friendly
    person, so getting permission to climb a water tower, while possible, is a
    none starter! I'm not an astronomy person, but I wouldn't mind learning if
    someone could point me in the right direction.

    Any suggestions for that award-winning shot?
    (If you're in the Indiana area, are shooting with an FL or FD lens mount
    Canon, and you want to borrow this lens, let me know- I've got two of them!)
     
    K W Hart, Sep 19, 2010
    #1
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  2. K W Hart

    dickr2 Guest

    Wow! If I lived closer to you I'd borrow one of those lenses to use on my
    Canon FD system, and use it for bird photography.
    BTW: What's the max lens opening? Minimum focus distance?

    Dick in Minnesota
     
    dickr2, Sep 19, 2010
    #2
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  3. K W Hart

    K W Hart Guest

    f/11, 135 feet. Focus scale is marked out to 1000 feet. Focus travel is
    about two inches, sufficient to throw the lens off-balance on the tripod.
    I assume that for birding, you would focus on a nest and wait for some
    action to take place there. Obviously, you couldn't follow a bird in flight.
    Is there a time of year when birds are in their nest a lot? I'm guessing
    spring.(Excuse my stupidity re birds!)
     
    K W Hart, Sep 19, 2010
    #3
  4. K W Hart

    Tim Conway Guest

    Spring is the best time for nesting activity. But, you can also catch them
    by watching them a while. Find a place where you can set up out of sight or
    not too obtrusively - with that lens, you should have room. A bird will
    frequently return to a favorite perch. Find one of those spots where they
    return to and focus on that and wait. Early morning and late afternoon are
    the best times for bird activity.
     
    Tim Conway, Sep 19, 2010
    #4
  5. K W Hart

    dickr2 Guest

    That's what I was thinking. To focus on an Eagle or Osprey nest might be
    ideal.
     
    dickr2, Sep 19, 2010
    #5
  6. K W Hart

    Robert Coe Guest

    : So, I've got this lens- a 1200mm Canon. It's a pretty piece of glass, but I
    : haven't come up with any ideas of what to use it for.
    :
    : So far, I've got two nice shots: one is a beautiful picture of the moon
    : (nearly full) where the moon fills a major portion of the 35mm frame. The
    : other is a picture of a courthouse clock tower taken from 1/2 mile away. I
    : wasn't able to get the entire tower in frame, only the clock and part of the
    : cupola. I thought of shooting a sunset, but (a) the sun fills the width of
    : the frame and (b) I thought that might be dangerous, either to my sight or
    : the camera's shutter.
    :
    : Sports pics are out, as the the lens must be tripod mounted (it's 3.5 feet
    : long), so following the action would be difficultt at best.
    :
    : Basically, you cannot clearly see with the naked eye what the lens will see-
    : it's a 24 power magnification. The setup time and effort requires that a
    : stationary subject and some pre-planning.
    :
    : I'm in a rural area; the nearest building over three stories tall is over
    : sixty miles away, so cityscapes are out. I'm also not a heights-friendly
    : person, so getting permission to climb a water tower, while possible, is a
    : none starter! I'm not an astronomy person, but I wouldn't mind learning if
    : someone could point me in the right direction.
    :
    : Any suggestions for that award-winning shot?
    : (If you're in the Indiana area, are shooting with an FL or FD lens mount
    : Canon, and you want to borrow this lens, let me know- I've got two of them!)

    Haul it to the zoo and see if you can get a picture of a white elephant. The
    lens may even turn out to be the elephant's brother. (I'm assuming, without
    any actual evidence, that the term "white elephant" has the same meaning in
    the rest of the English-speaking world as it does in the U.S.)

    There must be an interesting backstory regarding how and why you managed to
    acquire two(!) of those beasts. My best guess is that you're a bankruptcy
    liquidator. ;^)

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Sep 19, 2010
    #6
  7. K W Hart

    K W Hart Guest

    snip>
    Actually, I collect the Canon FX camera and Canon-brand lenses for it.
    Currently my collection has over 350 Canon FX (and co-branded
    Bell&Howel/Canon FX) bodies, and over 500 Canon FL-mount lenses. Over half
    of the lenses of course are the f/1.8 50mm 'normal' lens. I have examples of
    every lens in the origianl lineup except the 300mm Flourite.

    The 1200mm lens is part of a system of four: 400mm, 600mm, 800mm, and
    1200mm. The system consists of a focusing unit with aperature and a 'head
    end' that determines the focal length. The system was sold separately: you
    bought the focusing unit and the head end you wanted. It's fairly rare to
    have the entire system now, 40+ years later.

    I'm guessing that 'white elephant' status will kick in for my heirs! (Except
    for my nephew who is a very talented photographer- but he'll have to learn
    how film works!)
     
    K W Hart, Sep 19, 2010
    #7
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