Sun glasses with an SLR + polarizing filter

Discussion in '35mm Cameras' started by Scott W, Sep 9, 2008.

  1. Scott W

    Scott W Guest

    I have polarizing sunglasses, which are very nice for most things.
    But when I add a polarizer to my camera and then try to use it the
    viewfinder is all but useless, there is enough birefringence in the
    optical path that I get a really odd pattern of light and dark.

    I don’t use a polarizer that much so I keep forgetting about this
    problem, and often leave my normal glasses in the car. My correction
    is just a bit too strong for the diopter adjustment on the camera, for
    me to use it without glasses.

    Anyone else run into this same problem?

    I have to remember to take my non-polarizing sunglasses when I think I
    am going pop a filter onto the lens.

    I might start wearing my contact lenes more when I am photographing,
    at least then I can take off the sunglasses and still see through the
    viewfinder.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Sep 9, 2008
    #1
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  2. Scott W

    Eric Miller Guest

    I have polarizing sunglasses, which are very nice for most things.
    But when I add a polarizer to my camera and then try to use it the
    viewfinder is all but useless, there is enough birefringence in the
    optical path that I get a really odd pattern of light and dark.

    I don’t use a polarizer that much so I keep forgetting about this
    problem, and often leave my normal glasses in the car. My correction
    is just a bit too strong for the diopter adjustment on the camera, for
    me to use it without glasses.

    Anyone else run into this same problem?

    I have to remember to take my non-polarizing sunglasses when I think I
    am going pop a filter onto the lens.

    I might start wearing my contact lenes more when I am photographing,
    at least then I can take off the sunglasses and still see through the
    viewfinder.

    Scott


    Yes, I used to have that problem. The answer is Lasik.

    Eric Miller
    www.dyesscreek.com
     
    Eric Miller, Sep 9, 2008
    #2
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  3. Scott W

    RobertL Guest


    Won't the camera take a correcting lens added to the eyepiece?

    Robert
     
    RobertL, Sep 9, 2008
    #3
  4. Scott W

    Scott W Guest

    I have gotten so use to being able to take off my glasses and see
    really well up close that I don't think I would do well with Lasik.
    Just wearing contact lenses gives me a good clue as to what Lasik
    would be like, I don't know if I would want to go through life like
    that, with the contacts I can take them out.

    Scott
     
    Scott W, Sep 9, 2008
    #4
  5. Scott W

    Eric Miller Guest

    I have gotten so use to being able to take off my glasses and see
    Having had Lasik and being a former wearer of contact lenses for many years,
    other than corrected vision, I cannot understand why anyone would think that
    there is any similarity. There is nothing to "take out" after you have had a
    Lasik procedure and it doesn't leave you with the desire to take anything
    out.

    If your concern is presbyopia, then Lasik is a simple trade. Instead of
    taking your glasses off to view up close, you put them on to view up close,
    if you really need them. I have a little presbyopia, but do a lot of reading
    and do not need glasses. My post-lasik vision is somewhat better than 20/20.

    Eric Miller
    www.dyesscreek.com
     
    Eric Miller, Sep 11, 2008
    #5
  6. Scott W

    Eric Miller Guest

    It's been around nearly ten years. I had my procedure done in 2002. My
    impression of most of the complaints is that some people are bigger whiners
    than others. For a short while after the surgery, I had most of the
    side-effects that most of the whiners complain about, but even mentioning
    them gives more emphasis than they are due and, on the whole, I found
    contact lenses more troublesome than the temporary, post-surgery side
    effects. They all resolved, the inconvenience of contact lenses and
    eyeglasses never does. But if you want to focus on the 4.5 percent of Lasik
    patients who aren't "satisfied" (whatever that means), or even the ones who
    write articles in the New York Times complaining about it before they have
    fully recovered, then so be it.

    Some small percentage of people have probably died on the operating table.
    That means Lasik is deadly.

    Some other small percentage of people have probably died in a car on the way
    to their Lasik procedure: Yep, deadly again.

    Some achieved a level of correction that was not 20/20. Never mind that that
    level of vision wasn't promised to them, they aren't satisfied.

    Some ignored the disclosures that specifically tell them about the possible
    side-effects. So Lasik doesn't offer all it promises as far as they are
    concerned.

    I personally signed a disclosure that indicated, inter alia, that further
    follow-ups may be required and then I was personally told by my
    opthalmologist (sp?) that further correction might be necessary and that it
    was covered by the original fee. I didn't need it, but some do, so Lasik is
    a risky procedure that may require additional surgery.

    What is interesting is the actual metric that is being used in the oft-cited
    poll and that it is *satisfaction*. The *satisfaction* rate is 95%. How many
    surgical procedures have that high of a satisfaction rate? I wonder what the
    *success* rate is - how many people actually receive significant correction
    of their vision without significant side-effects?

    In any event, I certainly understand the reluctance to allow someone to cut
    on your eye and the clinging to any perceived negative comments, articles,
    studies or other publications as justification thereof. However, my
    Lasik-corrected vision is better than most people who don't need any
    correction (to be fair, before I started using eyeglasses, my vision was
    just as good as it is now) and I don't personally know of anyone who has had
    Lasik that regrets having the procedure.

    Now if I could just get a fully frame sensor implanted in one eye so I don't
    have to carry a camera around . . .

    Eric Miller
    www.dyesscreek.com
     
    Eric Miller, Sep 11, 2008
    #6
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