Taking Concert Photos and having trouble

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by Augustino Patti, Oct 3, 2005.

  1. Can anyone please let me know if they have trouble using the Canon 300
    Digital Camera, I am trying to shoot in low light as in a concert, bar type.
    All I need is some advice on what lens I need to use are any websites that
    can improve my shooting.

    Thanks,
    Tino
     
    Augustino Patti, Oct 3, 2005
    #1
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  2. I assume you mean the Digital Rebel, the 300D. You need a lens that allows
    wide open shots which can be had with primes but are very expensive with
    zoom lenses. In addition, if you can't use a tripod, you really need Image
    Stabilization (IS) unless you are a rock.

    You don't say whether you can use flash or not, but, in any event, you need
    to use a very high ISO (800 or 1600) in such dark settings.
     
    Steven Blackwood, Oct 3, 2005
    #2
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  3. I am using a Canon Powershot A80 and end up compensating by taking
    literally hundreds of shots knowing that only 1/3 will turn out to be worth
    putting on my website.

    As I shoot in a lot of crowded envrionments a tripod would be a liability
    in my case.

    I was at a live music performance last night and most of the people with
    point and shoot cameras were way back in the crowd trying to take photos.
    Only myself and the one other person there with a high end camera went up
    to the stage and changed position to capture a different perspective.

    Last night I would have taken more photos, but I had a friend with me and
    didn't want to leave her alone.

    Thanks.
     
    Tim Chmielewski, Oct 3, 2005
    #3
  4. Also I have the strong urge to tell people who come up to me with the
    suggestion "you know what'll make a good shot?"

    YES!

    Me kicking you up the arse!
     
    Tim Chmielewski, Oct 3, 2005
    #4
  5. : I was at a live music performance last night and most of the people
    : with point and shoot cameras were way back in the crowd trying to take
    : photos. Only myself and the one other person there with a high end
    : camera went up to the stage and changed position to capture a different
    : perspective.

    And did you notice how many people were WAY back from the stage using
    flashes and wondering why the picture didn't turn out? I always have to
    laugh at the people who seem to think that a flash from 100 yards away
    will help at all. Most consumer type cameras (both digital and film) have
    a flash with about a 10 ft effective range. at 100 yards it is just a
    waste of electricity. :)

    One other thing I have noticed is that most cameras that do an auto
    exposure, set for an average of the entire scene. So if you are far back
    from a brightly lit stage with dark all around it, the people on the stage
    are VERY overexposed. Getting close enough (either physically or with a
    long lens) that the entire frame is filled with well lit people and
    objects on the stage will be much more likely to give acceptable images
    (or at least images that can be adjusted in post production to become
    acceptable).

    Randy

    ==========
    Randy Berbaum
    Champaign, IL
     
    Randy Berbaum, Oct 3, 2005
    #5
  6. Augustino Patti

    Bill Funk Guest

    I imagine that most of those flashes were from cameras that
    automatically flash when the exposure system says to, and the shooters
    don't know how to turn the flash off.
    There's even a battery commercial on TV that shows flashes going off
    in a stadium, with the one camera with their battery flashing for a
    far longer time.
     
    Bill Funk, Oct 3, 2005
    #6
  7. Augustino Patti

    Matt Ion Guest

    You're shooting in very low light situations, so you'll want to find the
    fastest (ie. widest-aperture) lens you can afford, and/or one with IS
    (image stabilization) to allow you to shoot at lower shutter speeds.
    You'll probably want a fair zoom range, but don't overdo it, as the
    longer-range zooms tend to be bulkier, slower (smaller aperture) units
    for a lot more cost - something in a 70-200mm range would be decent.


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    Matt Ion, Oct 3, 2005
    #7
  8. Also I noticed this at a concert where people were not meant to take
    photos, but where taking them anyway. I was way up in the balcony and
    none of the photos people took would turn out.

    I have been trying not to use the flash at all if possible recently by
    shooting at ISO 400, 1/30, f2.8. This makes me more reliant on external
    light sources, but the photos tend to turn out better.

    My favourite photos I have taken this year was at this event:
    http://photos.timchuma.com/TownBikesCookOff/index.html

    Thanks.
     
    Tim Chmielewski, Oct 3, 2005
    #8
  9. Augustino Patti

    Ray Fischer Guest

    The 50mm f1.8 is a good start for a small venue.
    The 200mm f2.8 would be good for a large venue.

    Set the camera to ISO 800 and set the exposure manually by trying a
    few shots and reviewing until the histogram shows a correct exposure.
    Shooting RAW will get you more flexibility if you feel you can handle
    the post-processing.
     
    Ray Fischer, Oct 4, 2005
    #9
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