Taking covert pics

Discussion in 'UK Photography' started by Alasdair, Jun 5, 2008.

  1. Alasdair

    Chris H Guest

    I am starting to feel old and senile :-(
     
    Chris H, Jun 8, 2008
    #21
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  2. Alasdair

    MB Guest


    I have used my IXUS quite a few times in Archives and Record Offices to
    take a picture of a film or fiche off the screen, last time I went and got
    the bigger camera but the IXUS did the job just as well. It is usually for
    a permanent record and often so I can get a second opinion of some detail.

    There has been no problem in all cases except one.

    But many places are now requiring you to make a payment which can be as
    much as £20 to use a camera, a bit excessive if you only want a detail from
    one page.

    Where it has been possible to print from a film then I done that so I am
    not avoiding paying.

    I have also used my HP Capshare a few times but I would not use on a
    fragile document.

    Perhaps you follow the example of the Archive CD Book Project and come to
    some deal where you scan the books using the right equipment and make a
    copy available to the library?

    MB
     
    MB, Jun 9, 2008
    #22
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  3. Alasdair

    Victor Guest

    In answer to another post books can be damaged by photocopying on normal
    flatbed copier as they're not designed to lie flat, although staff seen
    oblivious to the potential damage being done by having books flattened out
    and hanging half way outside the copier.


    The "low light" requirement is rather confusing as in most libraries
    the level of lighting needs to be sufficiently bright for reading.
    Which is also normally bright enough for photography. I have no trouble
    photographing caption cards in museums hand-held for instance using just
    the available light. Using a bridge camera with a relatively small sensor
    at that.

    V.
     
    Victor, Jul 24, 2008
    #23
  4. This is also true for scanning books and photographing them is much
    'kinder'.
     
    Roger Blackwell, Jul 24, 2008
    #24
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