Taking panoramas with the D200 ?

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Don Wiss, May 24, 2006.

  1. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    One of the things I miss with the D200 is the panorama mode. I was aware
    that it wasn't a feature when I bought the camera. I suppose they assume
    anyone that can afford a D200 will have a tripod and panorama head; but
    when traveling I travel without a tripod or head.

    One option is to also take along my Nikon 8400. Going in and out of
    panorama mode automatically turns on and off exposure lock. And you get a
    partial ghost of the prior picture to help you line up the next.

    Of course the D200 has an exposure lock. One option is "AE-L/AF-L Button,"
    the default. The exposure is locked only as long as you hold down the
    AE-L/AF-L button. Not particularly useful when taking a bunch of shots.
    The there is the "AE Lock Hold." Here the AE-L/AF-L button toggles the
    exposure lock on and off. But I can't find any visible indication of which
    mode it is in. This is quite dangerous, as leaving it locked after you take
    a panorama ruins all subsequent pictures. So what are other D200 owners
    doing for panoramas?

    Don <www.donwiss.com/pictures/> (e-mail link at page bottoms).
     
    Don Wiss, May 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. I assume the D200 has a manual mode.

    What I do on my Canon 5 D is use the in camera meter, transfer those
    readings to the Manual mode and fire away. Works great for me.
     
    Scott in Florida, May 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. Don Wiss

    Guest Guest

    doesn't the ae-l indicator in the viewfinder light up?

    item #3:
    http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/NikonD200/Images/viewfinderdiag.jpg
     
    Guest, May 24, 2006
    #3
  4. Don Wiss

    Doug Payne Guest

    Manual exposure mode?
     
    Doug Payne, May 24, 2006
    #4
  5. the AEL indicator in the VF stays on. Or switch to manual. As for
    lining up the shots, I find turning on the gridlines helps (I use a
    ballhead; also I sometimes shoot handheld and then stitch, and the
    gridlines do help).
     
    achilleaslazarides, May 25, 2006
    #5
  6. I hardly ever take panoramas on tripods. When I do it's an ordinary
    tripod, not a special panorama head. I've used this with my Epson
    850Z and my Fuji S2; I haven't done a panorama with my D200 yet, but
    it'll work just the same as the others. (I'm stitching with Panorama
    Factory, the old free version.)

    You mention "exposure lock", but seem to have overlooked the
    possibility of just using manual exposure (hence no button to keep
    pushed).
     
    David Dyer-Bennet, May 25, 2006
    #6
  7. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    Let me see... I tend to not use the indicators in the view finder, but the
    LCD on the top of the camera. With my glasses, and the weight of the camera
    (it usually has the 18-200 on it), looking throuugh the viewfinder isn't
    all that easy, so I do it only to frame the picture. Okay. I found it. I
    suppose it will do.

    Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
     
    Don Wiss, May 25, 2006
    #7
  8. Don Wiss

    Cynicor Guest

    I really just do some tests to get the exposure correct, then set it to
    manual and take as many photos as needed plus a few extra. Then I stitch
    the pictures together. Digital Image Pro and PhotoShop both work well
    for that. The extra photos are handy because more is better than fewer.

    I did this one with the D200 and about seven or eight images stitched
    up. But I did use a tripod (obviously, because it was night.)
    http://trupin.smugmug.com/gallery/1279919/1/60120638
     
    Cynicor, May 25, 2006
    #8
  9. Don Wiss

    Don Wiss Guest

    I've always used PTGui, and I've stitched more than 200.
    I went and ate dinner while it was loading........ I gave up. Smugmug can't
    handle the original size.

    Don <www.donwiss.com/pictures/> (e-mail link at page bottoms).
     
    Don Wiss, May 25, 2006
    #9
  10. Don Wiss

    Frank ess Guest

    It loaded quick and easy for me, but the size of it made scrolling
    difficult. Wait; a second load solved the misplaced controls problem.

    I don't see any sharp objects there, among the lights. Was it fog, or
    blooming from overexposure, I wonder. A terrific view, and while I'm
    not a sharpness fanatic, it seems to me part of the joy in these big,
    detailed efforts is in the inspection.
     
    Frank ess, May 25, 2006
    #10
  11. Don Wiss

    Cynicor Guest

    A bit of overexposure. I got there a bit later than I would've liked.

    But since it's my photo we're talking about, let's overthrow the cult of
    sharpness and proper exposure!
     
    Cynicor, May 25, 2006
    #11
  12. For what it's worth this is a minor issue with the LightBox JS used by
    SmugMug on a small number of machines running Firefox. Unfortunately, I'm a
    small sample where two of my three machines will NOT load the image when
    one just clicks on the thumbnail. I went back and forth with several
    support guys at SM, but we never identified the issue. All you get the
    scrolling "loading" message and never any image. Works fine in IE. I've
    seen a similar issue with another site using LightBox as well IIRC.
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), May 25, 2006
    #12
  13. No tripod head needed. Use Aperture priority mode to set the aperture you
    want then meter across the scene to determine the appropriate average
    exposure to use in full manual mode. The following were done with my older
    D70, all handled:
    http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/dSLR/pano/index.html
     
    Ed Ruf (REPLY to E-MAIL IN SIG!), May 25, 2006
    #13
  14. Don Wiss

    Cynicor Guest

    If you wanna get really fancy with the D200, set the intervalometer on,
    and if you have a steady enough hand, you can just slowly pan while it
    takes the photos for you!

    :-D
     
    Cynicor, May 25, 2006
    #14
  15. The original size loaded OK for me, but because of its size was awkward to
    view. The large size looks great, but too small at 800 pixels wide; 1024
    would have been better and 1280 would be perfect for most of us, I expect.
     
    John Falstaff, May 27, 2006
    #15
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