Taking pics with no background

Discussion in 'UK Photography' started by R D S, Sep 6, 2005.

  1. R D S

    ah Guest

    Bloody.
     
    ah, Sep 12, 2005
    #41
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  2. R D S

    Phillip Kyle Guest

    Hell.

    --
    Phil Kyle™
    Uno
    Dos
    Tres
    Cuatro
    CINCO!!!!!!

    "Be very aware that my willingness
    to continue to criticise your sig
    is infinite." -- Neil Barker
     
    Phillip Kyle, Sep 12, 2005
    #42
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  3. R D S

    Rob Parry Guest

    Kitchen.
     
    Rob Parry, Sep 12, 2005
    #43
  4. R D S

    Phillip Kyle Guest

    er.


    --
    Phil Kyle™
    Uno
    Dos
    Tres
    Cuatro
    CINCO!!!!!!

    "Be very aware that my willingness
    to continue to criticise your sig
    is infinite." -- Neil Barker
     
    Phillip Kyle, Sep 12, 2005
    #44
  5. R D S

    ah Guest

    th.
     
    ah, Sep 14, 2005
    #45
  6. R D S

    ah Guest

    Sick!
     
    ah, Sep 14, 2005
    #46
  7. R D S

    Rob Parry Guest

    um.
     
    Rob Parry, Sep 14, 2005
    #47
  8. R D S

    Rob Parry Guest

    ag.
     
    Rob Parry, Sep 14, 2005
    #48
  9. R D S

    Phillip Kyle Guest

    Stick!

    --
    Phil Kyle™
    Uno
    Dos
    Tres
    Cuatro
    CINCO!!!!!!

    "Be very aware that my willingness
    to continue to criticise your sig
    is infinite." -- Neil Barker
     
    Phillip Kyle, Sep 14, 2005
    #49
  10. R D S

    ah Guest

    ronomy?
     
    ah, Sep 30, 2005
    #50
  11. R D S

    ah Guest

    eh.
     
    ah, Sep 30, 2005
    #51
  12. R D S

    ah Guest

    Slick!
     
    ah, Sep 30, 2005
    #52
  13. R D S

    Scotius Guest

    Not necessarily. Some of the older CCD or CMOS image capture
    technologies produce that kind of effect. Also, if you have the option
    of taking the image in a different format (some cameras allow TIFF or
    RAW), try one of those.
    Have you considered using a background other than white? You
    can always change the colour from white to black or vice versa with an
    image editing program like GIMP if you want to (and it's a good free
    one if you're on a PC... they may even have a Mac version).
    I'd say try a different background and then change the colour.
    You might get far better results.
     
    Scotius, Jan 22, 2010
    #53
  14. R D S

    Geoff Berrow Guest

    As the original article was posted in 2005, I suspect the guy has it
    sorted by now.

    He actually sent me a very nice pair of rimless specs.
     
    Geoff Berrow, Jan 22, 2010
    #54
  15. R D S

    neilmain Guest

    Metering systems work by trying to set the exposure to a value that
    gives an average brightness, or for spot or point metering that value at
    those points. It follows that if the scene is not 'average' then the
    exposure will be wrong. Very light coloured or very dark coloured
    subjects and backgrounds are not 'average'.

    There are two ways forward.
    Make the scene 'average' - place your spectacles on light to mid grey
    paper. This will make the metering on the camera expose the bulk of the
    scene to mid grey and also render the colours in the spectacles more
    accurately.
    Tel the camera that the scene is not average. Many modern digital
    cameras have an EV (exposure value) compensation adjustment. setting
    this to a plus figure will lighten the white background and make the
    (underexposed) colours in the spectacles more accurate. You will have
    to experiment to see what EV to use. On one of my cameras, while
    viewing a white sheet of paper, adjusting the EV from -2EV to +2EV makes
    the paper go from dark grey to bright white.

    See, for example:- http://www.photography.ca/phototips/meter.html
    Or Google something like 'photo metering mid grey'

    Illuminating with lamps (incandescent?) brings other problems. Google
    'colour temperature photography' or 'photography white balance'.
     
    neilmain, Jan 22, 2010
    #55
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