telephoto zoom for d40x

Discussion in 'Digital SLR' started by Alan Calan, Oct 22, 2007.

  1. Alan Calan

    Alan Calan Guest

    My friend and her daughter, for whom I bought the D40x are just crazy
    about it. Now they want to buy a longer zoom lens and asked my
    advice. I don't think they want to spend a lot of money and I wrote
    back an email to them trying to find out what they would use it for.

    The first day they got the camera, they went to a pro football game
    and I am sure the 18-55mm seemed anemic to them. However, I don't
    think sports photography will be their specialty. I would think
    parties, weddings, bar mitzvahs, graduations and some candid shots
    would be most of what they would need it for.

    I don't know the difference between a G lens and a DX lens. Does the
    D40x work better with a DX lens?

    I have a feeling the next lens should be a 55 to 200 or something in
    that rannge. B&H has a nice


    Nikon USA Zoom Telephoto AF VR Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G IF-ED
    AF-S Autofocus Lens (Vibration Reduction) - Black

    Mfr # 2161 • B&H # NI7030045AFS For $480

    or

    Nikon Imported Zoom Telephoto AF VR Zoom Nikkor 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6G
    IF-ED AF-S Autofocus Lens (Vibration Reduction) - Black

    Mfr # 2161 • B&H # NI7030045AFS for $470

    or

    Nikon Imported Zoom Normal-Telephoto 55-200mm f/4-5.6G ED AF-S VR DX
    Zoom-Nikkor Autofocus Lens (Vibration Reduction) for Digital Cameras

    Mfr # 2166 • B&H # NI5520045GAF for $225 I didn't see a USA
    version for a few dollars more but there must be one


    So, what do you all think? I kind of like the 70 to 300 VR but that
    is not a DX and that may be more than they want to spend. The 55 -
    200 VR seems like a great price, although it's a little slow for that
    kind of zoom.

    So, what do you all think.

    Alan
     
    Alan Calan, Oct 22, 2007
    #1
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  2. Alan Calan

    RichA Guest

    I think saving $10 on a $480 purchases is stupid, particularly if the
    warranty is effected.
     
    RichA, Oct 22, 2007
    #2
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  3. Alan Calan

    Guest Guest

    g means no aperture ring.

    dx means a smaller image circle and will only work on a nikon dslr; on
    the full frame nikon d3, the camera will use the center portion of its
    full frame sensor. on a film camera, the outer edges will vignette,
    however, it might cover the full frame at some of its focal lengths,
    just not all.

    with the d40x, the lens must have afs or it will not autofocus. a
    non-afs lens will still work, it will just have to be manually focused.

    i'd suggest either of these, depending on your budget:
    the built in stabilization is great, and in the case of the 55-200vr,
    it is very affordable.
     
    Guest, Oct 22, 2007
    #3
  4. Alan Calan

    ASAAR Guest

    Not really, but the D40x is a "DX" camera, which means that its
    sensor is smaller than the size of a traditional 35mm film frame,
    and DX lenses are designed to cover that smaller sensor. A non-DX
    lens, with its ability to provide a larger image than the DX sensor,
    is able to work with not only cameras that have DX sensors, but the
    new Nikon D3 (which has a larger full frame sensor) as well as most
    of Nikon's 35mm film bodies. The G lenses don't have manual
    aperture rings, and rely on using the camera to change aperture.

    That's not a DX lens, so while it will work very nicely on the
    D40x, it will probably be considerably larger and heavier than a
    comparable DX lens, if one existed. I think a better choice would
    be Nikon's 55-200mm AF VR Zoom, which is much lighter and compact,
    and also costs much less than the 70-300mm version. It's Nikon's
    only modestly priced VR lens, and supposedly is better optically
    than the slightly less expensive 55-200mm non-VR version, and is the
    one I bought several months ago.

    Look again. I bought the USA version from B&H, and even if it is
    out-of-stock, B&H should still have it listed on their website. For
    the few extra dollars you not only get Nikon's one year warranty (as
    opposed to whatever warranty B&H might provide, but also a 4 year
    warranty extension (5 years total) if you register the lens within a
    couple of weeks from the purchase date.
     
    ASAAR, Oct 22, 2007
    #4
  5. It is alleged that Alan Calan claimed:
    Depending on the distance and how "close" they want to get, the first
    three to be considered are the 55-200VR, the 70-300VR, and the
    18-200VR, all AF-S.

    The 55-200 is the longer reach "companion" lens to what they already
    have, this is the lens kit I currently have with my D40x.

    The 70-300 will give a longer reach, but added to what they have now
    will leave a small gap in focal length between 55 and 70. Note, too,
    that it's a larger diameter lens. If they are using any filters
    (polarizer, for example), they will have to get duplicates in the
    larger size.

    The 18-200 would essentially replace their current lens as it will do
    what they already have, plus more.

    Note that third party lens makers such as Sigma are introducing lenses
    that are fully compatible with the D40x, usually at a lower price point
    than Nikon lenses and with the same or better optical quality. Sigma's
    compatible lenses are "HSM" lenses, which is what they call their
    lenses with the internal focusing motor.

    Other options include a teleconverter, Nikon makes three or four of
    different strengths. Some people love them as a relatively inexpensive
    way to increase the focal length of their current lens setup, some
    people hate them because they can, depending on the TC and lens combo,
    degrade the optical quality of the final image (usually by "softening"
    the image).

    --
    Jeffrey Kaplan www.gordol.org
    The from userid is killfiled Send personal mail to gordol

    "Would you buy a book called "The Suggestions Of Acquisition"? (Grand
    Nagus Gint, DS9 "Body Parts")
     
    Jeffrey Kaplan, Oct 22, 2007
    #5
  6. Two totally different things.

    The G designation indicates that the lens does not have an apperture ring on
    the lens. The apperture can only be controlled from the camera, i.e. it will
    not work on (very) old cameras.

    The DX designation indicates that the lens was specifically designed for the
    DX size sensors of Nikon's DSLRs (except for the D3) and will not illuminate
    the full circle that is required for full-frame cameras like all film
    cameras and the D3. DX lenses can be made smaller and are therefore also
    lighter and cheaper than full-frame lenses but they cannot be used on
    full-frame cameras.
    One advantage of using full-frame lenses with DX sensors is that the weak
    spots of a lens are often in the corners (vignetting) or at the edges of the
    picture. Because the DX sensor only captures the center of the picture those
    weaknesses simply don't matter on a DX sensor. With a DX lens those
    weaknesses just move back into the edges and corners of the sensor.
    I bought that one. _Very_ nice consumer lens. Managed to get some some very
    nice photos with it. But it is _not_ a light-weight.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Oct 22, 2007
    #6
  7. Alan Calan wrote:
    []
    In addition to the other comments....

    I have both of these lenses [UK bought] for my D40, although the 70 -
    300mm VR is a very recent purchase and not used in anger as yet. The VR
    in both lenses is great, and works very well. It's really good to see the
    viewfinder image stabilise as the VR winds up. If they want compact and
    light, the 55 - 200mm is the lens to choose, if they /need/ the longer
    focal length (as I think I do after using the 55-200) and can tolerate the
    greater size and weight (and my jury is still out on this!), then the
    70-300mm.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Oct 22, 2007
    #7
  8. Careful. Many consumer-level tele-zoom lenses cannot be used with
    teleconverters in auto-focus mode because the appertures of those lenses is
    too small. Whenever it says xxx-5.6 or slower then that lens is not
    compatible with a TC.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Oct 22, 2007
    #8
  9. Alan Calan

    per Guest

    I've got the 55-200VR, it gives better picture quality than the 18-55 in the
    overlapping range, the size is compact and the weight is not a burdon.
    Highly recommended!
    /per
     
    per, Oct 22, 2007
    #9
  10. Alan Calan

    Guest Guest

    officially, the autofocus system does not support anything smaller than
    f/5.6, but in reality, it works just fine. in good light, there is a
    minor impact in focusing and in not so good light, the lens will hunt a
    lot, but ultimately lock focus. worst case, you can always manually
    focus (although it is kinda dark to do that effectively).

    a more important issue is if the teleconverter is physically
    compatible. nikon teleconverters have protruding elements which might
    collide with the rear of the lens, whereas third party ones do not.
    some teleconverters support autofocus and vr, and others don't.
     
    Guest, Oct 22, 2007
    #10
  11. Alan Calan

    Guest Guest

    overlapping 'range' ? the only common focal length is 55mm.
     
    Guest, Oct 22, 2007
    #11
  12. Alan Calan

    per Guest

    The 55-200 also has a non overlapping larger aperture at 55 mm! But in the
    overlapping range, the 55-200 takes considerably sharper pics!
    /per
     
    per, Oct 22, 2007
    #12
  13. Alan Calan

    Pboud Guest

    K.. You're obviously not talking focal ranges.. Based on your last, I
    assume overlapping ƒ ranges?

    P.
     
    Pboud, Oct 22, 2007
    #13
  14. Really? That's good to know, thank you.
    I was wondering about it, but didn't dare spending the money only to find
    out that it doesn't work. After all the Nikkor TCs are not exactly cheap.

    jue
     
    Jürgen Exner, Oct 22, 2007
    #14
  15. Alan Calan

    Alan Calan Guest

    On Mon, 22 Oct 2007 09:28:22 -0700, RichA <>
    wrote:

    No, NikonUSA is right up the road and it's not like saving 1/3 or more
    the price for a D200, if even that kind of discount exists. I don't
    understand how Broadway Camera can continue to sell products if they
    are baiting and switching and all the other things they are acused of.
    I don't understand how they don't get shut down. They must get
    stopped by the credit card companies. Sending them a check has to be
    idiotic. If I could get a non-US D200 for $944 with nothing missing
    from the box, like the battery and charger, I'd take the chance rather
    than spending $1,500 with B&H, as long as I use a credit card.

    Saving $10 on a lens is a joke.
     
    Alan Calan, Oct 23, 2007
    #15
  16. Alan Calan

    Alan Calan Guest

    So, that means you cannot adjust the fstop?

    It really does seem like a great price for a VR lens
     
    Alan Calan, Oct 23, 2007
    #16
  17. Alan Calan

    Alan Calan Guest

    So, buying a DX lens would be very limiting but much lighter?
    Wow, I never knew that. That isn't true for camera bodies too, is it?
     
    Alan Calan, Oct 23, 2007
    #17
  18. Alan Calan

    Alan Calan Guest

    Sigma 18-200mm f3.5-6.2 DC OS HSM. This one is expensive. The OS is
    Sigma's VR I think this lens is about $700. It is fast and has a
    pretty big range. The Sigma optics are better than Nikon.

    I bought a Tokina, like a 28 to 80, lens whose optics were the best
    I've ever had. That was about 8 years ago.
     
    Alan Calan, Oct 23, 2007
    #18
  19. Alan Calan

    Alan Calan Guest

    Is it true that a 2x teleconverter doubles the fStop?
     
    Alan Calan, Oct 23, 2007
    #19
  20. Alan Calan

    Guest Guest

    it is controlled electronically via a wheel on the camera, or
    automatically in auto-exposure mode. there is no need for mechanical
    linkages and the aperture ring anymore, and that makes it easier to
    keep dirt and moisture out too. if you put a g lens on an older
    mechanical camera that does not have an electronic control, you are
    restricted to one f/stop, since there is no way to adjust it, as the
    camera lacks the capability.
     
    Guest, Oct 23, 2007
    #20
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