Thank You All for advice on scanning b/w negatives

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by kenneth.kaiser, Apr 3, 2006.

  1. In my post, I asked for advice on scanning b/w negatives for the
    purpose of making contact prints.
    I received 39 responses that were all usefull, much more than I
    expected.
    I did get the Epson 4990 scanner as suggested, and it does a great job
    of making "contact prints" for the darkroom.
    I also learned that contact prints are not necessary, just look at the
    positive image on the monitor, then classify the negatives as yes, no,
    maybe. I do not have to save the scan or the contact print.
    I can crop and tone on the monitor, but these are secondary features.
    The other consideration in getting the 4990 is to use it as a darkroom
    densitometer. This is the subject of an article in the Jan/Feb 2006
    issue of PHOTO Techniques magazine. I got a calibrated step wedge and
    can now fine tune my developer/time to the print paper.
    This is all very usefull for me and has eliminated much of the darkroom
    drudgery, freeing up more time for print making.
    Thank You All Again
    Ken Kaiser
     
    kenneth.kaiser, Apr 3, 2006
    #1
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  2. kenneth.kaiser

    Lew Guest

    Is there any provision for holding 6 strips of 6 35mm exposures flat a la
    good old fashioned, wet darkroom proof sheets? I'm especially interested in
    those films (eg Efke) that are produced on a curly acetate base.
    -LS
     
    Lew, Apr 3, 2006
    #2
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  3. Hello Kenneth,

    Could you tell a little more about this ?? I'm living in Germany and
    have nor reseller for the Photo Techniques magazine...

    Stéphane.
     
    Stephane Schmuck, Apr 3, 2006
    #3
  4. kenneth.kaiser

    Mike King Guest

    Two things you could try:

    The Print File pages that hold 6 strips of 6 (if the glass plate of your
    scanner will hold these sheets, the size is a mite larger than the 7x5 Print
    File pages. You might have to cut and fit a piece of 1/4" plate glass to
    hold the negatives completely flat. (Have your glass jobber grind the edges
    smooth.)

    Saunders makes a "glassless" plate of plastic that would hold strips of
    negative. Saunders Super Proofer:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/product/46133/SASP35/REG/747

    Bonus idea, take the glass top plate from a Paterson 35mm contact printer
    and use that, it had a plastic holder for the negatives. See:
    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/product/40249/PAPC35/REG/747
     
    Mike King, Apr 3, 2006
    #4
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