The Next "Must-Have" ?

Discussion in 'Video Cameras' started by Tony Morgan, Apr 13, 2006.

  1. Tony Morgan

    Tony Morgan Guest

    A built-in camcorder GPS that stamps the Lat/Long of the shooting
    location on the video?
     
    Tony Morgan, Apr 13, 2006
    #1
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  2. Tony Morgan

    :::Jerry:::: Guest

    That's already been done in the pro ENG world, AIUI it was not a
    great "Must Have" as most camera crews already knew were they were in
    the world...!
     
    :::Jerry::::, Apr 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. Tony Morgan

    G Hardy Guest

    It shouldn't be too difficult with a proper GPS anyway. They maintain a
    track record of where you've been, so as long as the camera's clock is
    reasonably accurate, you can download the track to a spreadsheet to
    "inbetween" your position per minute/second/frame or whatever. Then you
    tally the two and superimpose the GPS data using your editor's titler.

    I think the coolest use for GPS data would be in a "moving map" scenario on
    a rally or expedition DVD, where you can switch angles and get a map of the
    car's location at any point in the event.
     
    G Hardy, Apr 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Not always :)

    regards

    Stuart

    www.mckears.com
     
    Stuart McKears, Apr 13, 2006
    #4
  5. Tony Morgan

    Geir Guest

    I have been thinking of that too, also with a laserbeam so the cam can
    measure the distance to the object and then give the coordinates for what
    you are shooting at. (when shooting on faraway objects then :) ).
     
    Geir, Apr 14, 2006
    #5
  6. Tony Morgan

    :::Jerry:::: Guest

    Actually, on a similar theme (and judging by some of the unintended
    'Dutch pan' footage I seen) rather than a GPS system how about a
    Gyroscope with a 'artificial horizon' display in the viewfinder / LCD
    screen?
     
    :::Jerry::::, Apr 14, 2006
    #6
  7. I would like a real follow focus device - pin a transmitter(???) on the subject
    and the camera would always stay in focus on the subject even if the camera
    and/or the subject moves.


    regards

    Stuart

    www.mckears.com
     
    Stuart McKears, Apr 14, 2006
    #7
  8. Tony Morgan

    Tony Morgan Guest

    You don't need a gyroscope. Just get a bubble leveller, araldite it to a
    hot-shoe fitting (Jessops do a 'blank' plastic hot-shoe fitting) and
    draw a horizontal line on your viewfinder with an OHP pen.
     
    Tony Morgan, Apr 14, 2006
    #8
  9. Tony Morgan

    :::Jerry:::: Guest

    How does one see the bubble when using a viewfinder?
     
    :::Jerry::::, Apr 14, 2006
    #9
  10. Tony Morgan

    Tony Morgan Guest

    Perhaps I should have mentioned it - use a tripod.
     
    Tony Morgan, Apr 14, 2006
    #10
  11. Tony Morgan

    :::Jerry:::: Guest

    Well yes, and all the professional tripods I've seen / used have a
    bubble level, I was thinking more about an aid when using the camera
    in the hand (or dare I say it, on the shoulder).
     
    :::Jerry::::, Apr 14, 2006
    #11
  12. Tony Morgan

    Ed Chilada Guest

    Still cameras have already started introducing this. I think it's
    rather cute, but I wouldn't pay much more for it and I wouldn't want
    it to result in a big bulge on the side of the camera.

    http://www.geospatialexperts.com/ricoh.html


    Still, I wouldn't be surprised if most cameras have them in within 3
    or so years.
     
    Ed Chilada, Apr 19, 2006
    #12
  13. Tony Morgan

    RobDee Guest


    My Nikon D200 connects via a cord to my GPS unit. At first I thought this
    was something of a gimmick. However, as one of my major occupations is
    photography / videography of Wild Animals / Wild Places in various
    out-of-the-way parts of the World (along with the exploits of my
    accompanying Adventurers), it has proven to be really useful.

    Just been looking at some exif data of a series of pics of Iberian Wall
    Lizards - these are currently undergoing reclassification and the gps data
    is proving invaluable in finding the range limits of the various subspecies
    without having to pour through reams of notes!

    Rob
     
    RobDee, Apr 19, 2006
    #13
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