Thread on lens filter

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Phil, Feb 17, 2013.

  1. Phil

    Phil Guest

    Hi, I'm trying to find/adapt a lens filter to fit my Fujifilm S1800
    bridge camera which has no manufacturer filter available.

    I can buy an adapter to use a 70mm filter but they are huge and tend to
    clip off the corners of the frame.

    The type of filter is not important at this point but what I am trying
    to find out is the relationship between the lens size and the mounting
    thread.

    Does a 42mm filter have a 42mm thread or is there some other factor
    involved?

    Any help welcomed.
     
    Phil, Feb 17, 2013
    #1
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  2. I pulled my 58mm CPL and G9 adaptor out of the desk drawer but, alas, my
    tape measure is too crappy to say accurately. I'll just say the stated size
    and adaptor thread size look close enough to be a yes.

    Adaptors often have vignetting at the widest angle. I hate it but if you
    shoot allowing for cropping room you're good.
     
    Charles E. Hardwidge, Feb 17, 2013
    #2
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  3. Phil

    Whiskers Guest

    One of the square filter systems may be of use - eg Cokin or Lee. They use
    holders which clip onto an adaptor fitted to the lens; quite large filter
    squares are available, so vignetting should be avoidable.
     
    Whiskers, Feb 18, 2013
    #3
  4. Phil

    Joel Guest

    Most if not all camera manufactures don't do lens filter. I don't own any
    Fujifilm to know much about it, but from my understanding the filter size
    usually printed on the lens itself.

    If it's 42mm then it should be 42mm because 42mm always be 42mm. The only
    thing you may need to pay some attention is the thread is INSIDE or OUTSIDE
    of the lens
     
    Joel, Feb 26, 2013
    #4
  5. Phil

    Joel Guest

    Unless the filter is a LONG TUBE else a regular filter should be real tin
    and it shouldn't cause any problem. The only problem that Fujifilm sounds
    like a P&S camera, the quality may not be very high, the price isn't too
    expensive and so on. Now adding a cheapie filter to the lens may not worth
    the trouble, and usually lower the quality of the image.

    Unless some special filter for special photography (like in the bright
    sky, photography water, glass etc..). I am not wild life photographer who
    sometime photograph real poor condition (like wet, mud, branches etc. in the
    forest) who usually use filter to protect the lens from being damaged (eaier
    to clean), so I never use any filter myself. But that's because I use DSLR
    and the lens has a hood for protection.
     
    Joel, Feb 26, 2013
    #5
  6. Phil

    Ian Guest

    Hi.

    I've had a look at the S1800 on a few web pages and can't see any filter
    thread on the lens.
    It also looks as though the front tube of the lens retracts into the back
    tube when the camera is switched off - would this movement be impaired if a
    filter was on the front of the lens?

    There are (or used to be) filter holders which clamped onto the tube or the
    body of a camera. Cokin's A300 holder is fixed to the camera body via the
    tripod socket.
    http://www.cokin.co.uk/pages/filterfast.htm
    http://www.wexphotographic.com/webcontent/pdf/cokin/cokin_brochure_2012.pdf

    Back in the 1960s there were filters that clipped onto the outside of the
    lens tube (i.e. the inside diameter of the metal ring of the filter was just
    wide enough to fit over the lens tube.
    Haven't seen any of these for years.
    Note that clip-on lens caps may clip onto the thread on the inside of the
    lens tube so "clip-on" seems to be used ambiguously.


    Good hunting,
    Ian.
     
    Ian, Feb 26, 2013
    #6
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