Tips wanted

Discussion in 'Photography' started by tony cooper, Dec 9, 2012.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    Reflection off eyeglasses is a problem for me, especially in a group
    shot where there are several glasses wearers and one's head is tilted
    right and another one's isn't. It's even worse with flash even if
    bounce is used.

    What technique do others employ?
     
    tony cooper, Dec 9, 2012
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    First there is the obvious, I think that positioning of the group is
    going to be critical, taking light sources into account.

    With flash, consider off camera flash and some sort of diffuser,
    light-box, or umbrella setup.

    Then there is the surefire fix, have everybody take their glasses off. ;-)
     
    Savageduck, Dec 9, 2012
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    : Reflection off eyeglasses is a problem for me, especially in a group
    : shot where there are several glasses wearers and one's head is tilted
    : right and another one's isn't. It's even worse with flash even if
    : bounce is used.
    :
    : What technique do others employ?

    I usually try to use bounce flash and hope for the best. For shots of large
    groups, I just ignore the issue.

    If I'm going to be in a picture myself, I try to remember to take my glasses
    off.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 9, 2012
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    Well, I'm thinking of more spur-of-the-moment stuff where you decide
    to take a photograph. Besides, I don't own a diffuser, light-box, or
    umbrella.
    The people don't look natural if they are people who always wear
    glasses.
     
    tony cooper, Dec 9, 2012
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    Savageduck Guest

    Yup! I am one of those.
     
    Savageduck, Dec 9, 2012
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    Alan Browne Guest

    #1: Get the flash off of the camera and fire it remotely from a
    position where there is no specular reflection to the lens.

    #2: Adjust the angle of the glasses on the wearer and,
    Adjust the angle of the wearers head.

    I've done a lot of these and #1 is the sure fire cure, #2 is a stop gap
    that can make the subject look odd or shot from a bad position.

    Also #1 is usually the better way to light a subject in any case.
    (About 45° off camera axis (from the subject) and somewhat above that line.)

    #3 Use polarizers on both flash and lens set 90° to each other. Not
    practical in most cases. ('cause you don't have the flash pol).
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 9, 2012
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    Alan Browne Guest

    Even with bounce, unless it's straight up, there is a straight line to
    the subject that will reflect off the glasses.

    This could be "gobo'd" to block that path so all the light comes from
    the ceiling.
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 9, 2012
    #7
  8. tony cooper

    Alan Browne Guest

    I'll add what I just replied to Bob.

    Assuming that remote firing is not an option for you, bounce as usual
    but put something between the flash and the subject so there is no
    straight line path for the light from the flash. This might do it.
    Black paper or carton for example.
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 9, 2012
    #8
  9. tony cooper

    Joel Guest

    There is pretty much no way to avoid glaring or reflection problem with
    flash. If photograph 1 or few people you can ask them to tilt their head
    down a little, and hoping everyone tilt far enough and right angle to get
    away with the problem.

    For the group, I guess one of the best tricks you can do is showing off
    your retouching skill. Luckily with group photo it doesn't need small
    detail, so you should be easily getting away with some quick and dirty
    fix(es).

    With group shot, I fix eyeglass glaring and eyes closed pretty often so I
    know you can get away with dirty fix. But you have to have the replacement
    from other photo.

    If you want to talk about all situations then I would say photograph in
    STUDIO with strobe(s) setup (not in front of object like regular flash) it's
    probably the only best way. And for group shot with strobes you still have
    to have a good distance and angle (usually both sides).

    And YES, good distance often (not always) work with regular flash too (I
    often use defuser and bounce off ceiling or wall). Or delivery evenly and
    weaken the strong light source, and with the combination of distance often
    help.
     
    Joel, Dec 9, 2012
    #9
  10. tony cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    :
    : > Reflection off eyeglasses is a problem for me, especially in a group
    : > shot where there are several glasses wearers and one's head is tilted
    : > right and another one's isn't. It's even worse with flash even if
    : > bounce is used.
    : >
    : > What technique do others employ?
    :
    : There is pretty much no way to avoid glaring or reflection problem with
    : flash. If photograph 1 or few people you can ask them to tilt their head
    : down a little, and hoping everyone tilt far enough and right angle to get
    : away with the problem.
    :
    : For the group, I guess one of the best tricks you can do is showing off
    : your retouching skill. Luckily with group photo it doesn't need small
    : detail, so you should be easily getting away with some quick and dirty
    : fix(es).
    :
    : With group shot, I fix eyeglass glaring and eyes closed pretty often so I
    : know you can get away with dirty fix. But you have to have the replacement
    : from other photo.
    :
    : If you want to talk about all situations then I would say photograph in
    : STUDIO with strobe(s) setup (not in front of object like regular flash) it's
    : probably the only best way. And for group shot with strobes you still have
    : to have a good distance and angle (usually both sides).

    If you're a professional studio photographer, have an array of empty frames
    available to substitute for the subject's glasses. Unless the subject is so
    nearsighted that his/her disorientation can't be hidden, it should work. The
    risk, though, is that not having *any* reflection off the glasses might itself
    be perceived by the viewer as abnormal.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 10, 2012
    #10
  11. tony cooper

    otter Guest

    Kelby showed a technique in one of his books, where he took pictures
    with, and without glasses, and merged them.
    However, probably wouldn't work too well in a spur of the moment group
    shot. You could take multiple pictures and have people move their
    heads around and pick and replace the heads that work best, like you
    see in the ads on TV. I have to admit, I've never tried that, though.

    Posed group shots aren't really my thing, so it is not something I run
    into a lot.
     
    otter, Dec 10, 2012
    #11
  12. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    The only time I do group shots is when the family has a get-together.
    This time, it was my brother and his wife, my son and his wife and two
    kids, and my wife and I. My brother lives in Denmark, so this kind of
    get-together is not all that frequent.

    I use a tripod and a remote, shoot several shots, and hope one comes
    out. There's a limit to how many shots I can get away with. The
    subjects get bored...especially the grandsons.

    The final shot I used has one head - the youngest grandchild - taken
    from another shot in the sequence. Since the photos were taken in
    fairly rapid sequence, the Photoshop head replacement was dead simple.

    I Photoshopped some eyeglass glare out, but didn't knock myself out
    with this. It's not a formal portrait.
     
    tony cooper, Dec 10, 2012
    #12
  13. tony cooper

    qrk Guest

    If angling the flash head towards the subject(s), I use a hotel key
    card as a barn door to prevent direct light from hitting the
    subject(s). Use a rubberband to hold the card in place.
     
    qrk, Dec 10, 2012
    #13
  14. tony cooper

    Robert Coe Guest

    : On Sun, 09 Dec 2012 17:59:30 -0500, Alan Browne
    :
    : >On 2012.12.09 17:09 , Robert Coe wrote:
    : >> On Sun, 09 Dec 2012 16:07:32 -0500, tony cooper <>
    : >> wrote:
    : >> : Reflection off eyeglasses is a problem for me, especially in a group
    : >> : shot where there are several glasses wearers and one's head is tilted
    : >> : right and another one's isn't. It's even worse with flash even if
    : >> : bounce is used.
    : >> :
    : >> : What technique do others employ?
    : >>
    : >> I usually try to use bounce flash and hope for the best.
    : >
    : >Even with bounce, unless it's straight up, there is a straight line to
    : >the subject that will reflect off the glasses.
    : >
    : >This could be "gobo'd" to block that path so all the light comes from
    : >the ceiling.
    :
    : If angling the flash head towards the subject(s), I use a hotel key
    : card as a barn door to prevent direct light from hitting the
    : subject(s). Use a rubberband to hold the card in place.

    Modern flash units have a reflectorized card that pulls out from the top edge
    of the unit to form a "catchlight" to increase the light thrown on the subject
    when the unit is tilted that way. What you're describing could be implemented
    as a similar card that would pull out from the bottom edge to divert light
    away from the subject. Maybe we should patent the idea and split the
    royalties.

    The one drawback I can think of is that such a reverse catchlight might
    actually divert too much light away. In most cases I don't think you want
    *all* of the light to be angling down from the ceiling. Maybe what you really
    want is to extend both the (existing) catchlight and the diffuser. That might
    be a mix of light that wouldn't reflect too badly.

    I once saw a newspaper photographer using a tilted flash with a diffuser (but
    no catchlight) outdoors on a clear day. (We were photographing a parade.) I
    was a bit of a newbie at the time and didn't have the guts to ask him what the
    hell he was thinking. Maybe he just wanted a bit of light off the bottom and
    was willing to send the rest of it in the general direction of the outer
    planets. 'Cause that's pretty much what he was doing.

    Bob
     
    Robert Coe, Dec 10, 2012
    #14
  15. tony cooper

    Alan Browne Guest

    The problem there is that the image of the flash light will appear in
    the glasses no matter how little there is or how diffused.
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 10, 2012
    #15
  16. tony cooper

    Alan Browne Guest

    Sort of opposite to the bouncer extension built in (or the business card
    rubber banded on to the flash).

    I'd use something a little larger I think to be sure there was no "leak"
    around the edges.
     
    Alan Browne, Dec 10, 2012
    #16
  17. tony cooper

    dadiOH Guest


    Time was, flash reflectors were not shaped to put all the light within a
    sharply defined rectangle...the light gradually fell off from the center.
    He was adding light to his subject and was avoiding burning up the
    foreground. Perfectly acceptable procedure. No idea why he bothered with a
    diffuser, it was doing zilch.

    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    Winters getting colder? Tired of the rat race?
    Maybe just ready for a change? Check it out...
    http://www.floridaloghouse.net
     
    dadiOH, Dec 11, 2012
    #17
  18. tony cooper

    otter Guest

    Maybe he was screwing up, like people tend to do from time-to-time.
    Or maybe he was using a sto-fen, with a reflector that you didn't
    notice, to provide some fill-flash.
     
    otter, Dec 11, 2012
    #18
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