Tray Siphon Setup Question

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Alan Smithee, Oct 3, 2004.

  1. Alan Smithee

    Alan Smithee Guest

    I scored a used tray siphon from ebay. It seems "too tall" to properly clip
    on to my 11X14 tray. Is there some sort of trick to using these things. BTW,
    I paid $25 for it used...my local photo dealer wanted $120 CDN for a new
    one...must of been a Leica tray siphon...
     
    Alan Smithee, Oct 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. The siphon is supposed to hang down to a much lower level than the bottom of
    the tray. You set the tray down next to the sink, with the siphon hanging
    into the sink.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. Alan Smithee

    Alan Smithee Guest

    My sink is 30"X96". So I need to build a stand for my wash tray to perch
    upon. I notice it does clip nicely to the generic dish trays which I use for
    processing 8X10s. Maybe I'll just buy another. Thx.
     
    Alan Smithee, Oct 3, 2004
    #3
  4. My sink is 30"X96". So I need to build a stand for my wash tray to perch
    You could invert a Rubbermaid basin or something underneath it... no need to
    build a stand.

    BTW, I assume we're talking about the Kodak Automatic Tray Siphon. I've
    found it requires a fairly high flow rate to keep the siphon going. If you
    turn down the water too low, then it stops siphoning and your tray
    overflows! Of course, in an environment where overflow is OK, this may not
    be objectionable; it still gives good agitation.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 4, 2004
    #4
  5. Alan Smithee

    Alan Smithee Guest

    Yes it is the classic auto tray siphon. Seems to do the job. Thanks for the
    tip about using another tray to lift it a bit. Cheers.
     
    Alan Smithee, Oct 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Alan Smithee

    Mike King Guest

    Rather than build a stand I just invert another tray of the same size in the
    sink to get the proper height.
     
    Mike King, Oct 7, 2004
    #6
  7. Alan Smithee

    John McGraw Guest

    $120!! Good lord man! That sounds like ~$100 more than it's worth :eek:)
    John
     
    John McGraw, Oct 8, 2004
    #7
  8. Those are Canadian dollars but...!
     
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 8, 2004
    #8
  9. Leica, heck no, more like Linhoff/HP Marketing.

    $42 at B&H, still too high for a rubber hose and 4oz of badly
    molded plastic.
     
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Oct 8, 2004
    #9
  10. It takes two trays: turn one upside down in the sink. Set the wash tray on
    top of it. Put the siphon into the wash tray that is now elevated above the
    sink.
     
    Maxwell Sandford, Oct 8, 2004
    #10
  11. this is true.

     
    Wm. J. Rentenbach, Oct 12, 2004
    #11
  12. Alan Smithee

    xxx Guest

    I use this set up as a water stop bath. My siphon is in a top tray that sits
    upon a second inverted tray. I run the water fast during the minute
    stop-rinse, then turn it off when I'm ready to tranfer the paper to the
    fixer.

    Why did they make the downspout so dang long? Must be something required for
    the physics of the thing.

    J. Stewart
     
    xxx, Oct 14, 2004
    #12
  13. If it's going to operate by siphoning down the water level in the tray,
    and then letting it rise again, the bottom of the spout must be enough
    lower than the lowest water level (before the siphon breaks) to overcome
    losses and produce a usable flow rate. Most likely that will require
    3-4 inches of drop below the minimum level; less drop will still siphon,
    but the flow rate would be too low to lower the level in the tray.

    What I don't understand about these devices is how they start the siphon
    -- since the internal tube has to go over the lip of the tray, the water
    level can't get high enough to start the siphon "naturally" after it
    breaks at the low point of the cycle, so what starts it!?

    --
    I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz!
    -- E. J. Fudd, 1954

    Donald Qualls, aka The Silent Observer
    Lathe Building Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/HomebuiltLathe.htm
    Speedway 7x12 Lathe Pages http://silent1.home.netcom.com/my7x12.htm

    Opinions expressed are my own -- take them for what they're worth
    and don't expect them to be perfect.
     
    Donald Qualls, Oct 14, 2004
    #13
  14. There is a small internal jet that "helps" the thing start.
     
    Jean-David Beyer, Oct 14, 2004
    #14
  15. I start mine by holding my finger over the output (in the tray) until water
    completely fills the siphon device. I think it will start itself if the
    water flow rate is high enough and it's perfectly clean and crack-free.
     
    Michael A. Covington, Oct 14, 2004
    #15
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