Tri-X turns 60

Discussion in 'Digital Cameras' started by George Kerby, Mar 13, 2014.

  1. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    George Kerby, Mar 13, 2014
    #1
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  2. George Kerby

    newshound Guest

    newshound, Mar 13, 2014
    #2
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  3. I still have a freezer full of Tech Pan, which I would argue was
    Kodak's best B&W film.
     
    Oregonian Haruspex, Mar 13, 2014
    #3
  4. George Kerby

    Savageduck Guest

    The last time I used Tri-X was back in 1971 when I still had a wet darkroom.
     
    Savageduck, Mar 13, 2014
    #4
  5. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    Tech pan was know for being grain-free, however the slow ASA kept it from
    being a good general-purpose film. I used it a lot for copy work...
     
    George Kerby, Mar 13, 2014
    #5
  6. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    Stainless steel reels, or those plastic ones where you "worked" the roll on
    from the outside to the center?

    When I conquered the ss reels and loaded film without any crimps,
    undeveloped area, or resulting 'half-moons', I thought I was king of the
    world!
     
    George Kerby, Mar 13, 2014
    #6
  7. George Kerby

    Savageduck Guest

    I don't know about real "plastic", I had two of my father's 1947-1950
    vintage bakelite tanks which did a great job and were quite smooth
    loaders. Then sometime around 1968 I got a stainless tank with the
    notorious wire spiral holder which could be a royal PIA.
    Yup!
     
    Savageduck, Mar 13, 2014
    #7
  8. George Kerby

    J. Clarke Guest

    Now try doing that in the trunk to a Volvo sometime because it's the
    only place to which you have access that is dark enough after your
    changing bag blew away.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 14, 2014
    #8
  9. George Kerby

    RichA Guest

    Kodak's best was Tech Pan, it was beyond the capability of lenses. Tri-X was grainy and only used by news photogs because they understood how it functioned. HP-5 was better in the 1980's and currently, T-Max is much better as is XP-2, a chromogenic B&W film. The best developer for conventional black and white films, if you can still find it, is Agfa Refinal.
     
    RichA, Mar 14, 2014
    #9
  10. George Kerby

    RichA Guest

    The article itself was very good, the writer did their homework. Whenever people write articles about technical subjects, if you are involved in those subjects yourself, you can instantly spot the fact a writer might be unfamiliar with that subject. Errors and use incorrect use of jargon are the major giveaways. This one was good, thanks.
     
    RichA, Mar 14, 2014
    #10
  11. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    Nope, Microdol-X...
     
    George Kerby, Mar 14, 2014
    #11
  12. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    You're welcome...
     
    George Kerby, Mar 14, 2014
    #12
  13. George Kerby

    Mr. Strat Guest

    Mr. Strat, Mar 14, 2014
    #13
  14. George Kerby

    Whisky-dave Guest

    I didn't think Tr-X was similar use to FP4. I prefered HP4 over tri X not sure why, might have been because it was cheaper, and could be brought on 50ft rolls.
     
    Whisky-dave, Mar 14, 2014
    #14
  15. George Kerby

    J. Clarke Guest

    Depends on what you're trying to do. Microdol softens grain boundaries
    a bit making for a less grainy appearance. OTOH you can achieve usable
    images at 4000 ISO from Tri-X using HC-110 Replenisher (not the
    developer) (and no, I don't have the procedure--it was on a note tucked
    into my Photo Lab Index that was destroyed when the basement flooded a
    while back). Saying that one process is "the best" ignores the issue of
    purpose.
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 14, 2014
    #15
  16. George Kerby

    Martin Brown Guest

    I liked Ilford FP4 for general use back then.
    Kodak D-11 used to be good for pushing Tri-X hard (and some other
    scientific films). It all depended what effect you needed.

    I don't really miss wet chemistry darkroom work. I have had more than my
    fill of stop bath and fixer smells and still vividly recall choking on
    the fumes from Cibachrome colour print chemistry - as the instructions
    so coyly put it this solution may dissolve some metals - like chrome,
    iron, lead and copper. Fail to put the neutraliser powder in before
    disposing of it and you ended up choking in clouds of SO2.
     
    Martin Brown, Mar 14, 2014
    #16
  17. I don't know, I like UFG single mix, but I'm lazy and it is very
    forgiving. Everybody eventually finds a favorite developer.
     
    Oregonian Haruspex, Mar 14, 2014
    #17
  18. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    So could most all of Kodak's B&W line.
     
    George Kerby, Mar 14, 2014
    #18
  19. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    Agreed. There is NO best for anything, but Microdol-X was what was the most
    popular and what Kodak recommended on it's enclosed data sheet. And I do
    remember those Kodak Data guide for B&W recommending HC110. I can't find
    mine right now either, but came across the Color Data guide which listed the
    procedure of processing E-3 Ektachrome. (remember the step where you pull it
    out and expose it to light?)
     
    George Kerby, Mar 14, 2014
    #19
  20. George Kerby

    George Kerby Guest

    I spent so much time in the B&W darkroom that the finger nails turned
    yellow. That wasn't as bad as a guy I knew back then who would eat his lunch
    by the glow of the amber safelight.
     
    George Kerby, Mar 14, 2014
    #20
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