upgrdading from fuji sensia 100 => ???

Discussion in 'Fuji' started by Philippe Lauwers, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. Hello,

    As a (35 mm) slide-film, up to now I've been using Fuji Sensia 100, and I've
    been thinking about an upgrade to Velvia 100F, of maybe Provia 100F(they
    have finer grain, don't they ?).
    Since I'm leaving to Morroco for a two-week trip next week, I don't have
    time to do a lot of testing so I hope someone can give me some valuable
    advice ...

    1. Which 'professional' film comes closest to Sensia, as far as the
    (neutral) color-balance is concerned.
    2. I've read that Velvia yields much more saturated colors; is it
    possible to obtain slightly less saturated colors (for instance) by rating a
    Velvia 100F @ 120 ISO instead of 100 ISO, or will I only get a slight blue
    cast ?
    3. Other suggestions are welcome too, of course

    I've heard horrible stories about the pricing of the Provia films, hence my
    question about underexposing Velvia ...

    Thx,

    Philippe
     
    Philippe Lauwers, Mar 6, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Philippe;

    Sensia, is essentially Provia. The difference being the batch to batch
    consistancy of Provia and Provia is also supposed to be kept refrigerated
    when you buy it. I know pro's that shoot Sensia instead of Provia because they
    shoot 35mm. I would do the same. Sensia is not available in medium and large
    format films which I shoot.

    Velvia 100F is slightly different than Provia the grain structure of
    Velvia 100F could be a benefit for 35mm , but
    the balance and saturation of 100F are no better or worse than Provia.
    Velvia 50 is the saturated film people talk of and has very tight grain.

    Basically to get consistant balance you must use a prolab, the same lab
    on a regular basis....and even then its debatable imop. You really have to
    test and determine this for your own circumstances where you want to be
    for exposing the the film.
     
    Gregory W Blank, Mar 6, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertisements



  3. Kodachrome 64 Professional. I would not even consider taking anything else.
     
    Michael Scarpitti, Mar 6, 2004
    #3
  4. Too bad that it's getting harder to find (I haven't seen it near me).
    And Kodachrome processing is too expensive and fussy for casual users.
    In any fairly big city it's still possible to get one-day or even
    three-hour E-6 processing done.

    -Luigi
     
    Luigi de Guzman, Mar 7, 2004
    #4
  5. Philippe Lauwers

    thigmo Guest

    Fuji Astia (now called Astia 100F)

    Finer grain, perfectly neutral. Essentially, professional Sensia.
     
    thigmo, Mar 7, 2004
    #5
  6. Philippe Lauwers

    Frank Pittel Guest

    No offense but since you don't have time to do a reasonable amount of film
    testing before leaving I would suggest that you stick with the film that you
    are familiar with.

    : Hello,

    : As a (35 mm) slide-film, up to now I've been using Fuji Sensia 100, and I've
    : been thinking about an upgrade to Velvia 100F, of maybe Provia 100F(they
    : have finer grain, don't they ?).
    : Since I'm leaving to Morroco for a two-week trip next week, I don't have
    : time to do a lot of testing so I hope someone can give me some valuable
    : advice ...

    : 1. Which 'professional' film comes closest to Sensia, as far as the
    : (neutral) color-balance is concerned.
    : 2. I've read that Velvia yields much more saturated colors; is it
    : possible to obtain slightly less saturated colors (for instance) by rating a
    : Velvia 100F @ 120 ISO instead of 100 ISO, or will I only get a slight blue
    : cast ?
    : 3. Other suggestions are welcome too, of course

    : I've heard horrible stories about the pricing of the Provia films, hence my
    : question about underexposing Velvia ...

    : Thx,

    : Philippe




    --




    Keep working millions on welfare depend on you
     
    Frank Pittel, Mar 7, 2004
    #6
  7. Philippe Lauwers

    Mike King Guest

    I'll second that!! If you don't have time to thoroughly test a new film
    before a (for me anyway) once in a lifetime trip, you'd be taking an
    enormous risk to use anything but what you already know and understand.
    (Better the devil you know.)

    The color palettes of all three are similar, Velvia is more contrasty.As far
    as grain, ALL modern ISO 100 color slide films are pretty darn good, much
    better than anything available even a few years ago.

    ON the other hand, if you get to Morocco every few weeks (grin) shoot a
    different type of film each time you go.
     
    Mike King, Mar 7, 2004
    #7
  8. Well, I think I haven't been telling you guys everything : I aim to make
    ilfochrome prints of my best pictures (probably 12*16). That's why I want
    the finest grain possible (with a film that I can use @ 100 ISO). I've been
    doing a batch of 12*16 prints from TMX negatives last year, and I have a
    feeling that any more grain wouldn't be desirable.

    It wouldn't be impossible to do any testing at all, it's just that I don't
    have the time to test 10 different emulsions. I was hoping to get to one
    suggestion, and to shoot the same pictures on both a roll of Sensia, and the
    other film (I have two SLR's, so that's something I could easily do in a day
    or two).
    As far as testing is concerned, can anyone give me some tips on what kind of
    pictures to shoot. Please don't say I have to shoot the same kind of
    pictures I plan to shoot in Morocco, since I don't know what to excpect
    there. So I might even end up going there every few weeks after all ;-)
     
    Philippe Lauwers, Mar 7, 2004
    #8
  9. You want something with a grey card so you can evaluate the color balance,
    maybe a scene near a beach under the time of day you typicall shoot, a parking lot
    may also work... or other paved surface which would be "like" a desert area.

    The Kodak E films have very tight T Grain, for enlarging. E 100VS
    is very saturated. I would at least try that and possibly Fuji Astia
    for lower contrast, but nice saturation....just a couple added thoughts.
     
    Gregory W Blank, Mar 7, 2004
    #9
  10. Philippe Lauwers

    mr. chip Guest


    Unless I am mistaken, Sensia is the 'unripened' version of Astia. Astia have
    recently upgraded Astia and therefore there is a new Sensia too. I think
    they have finer grain than just about any film out there. Even Velvia 50.

    Simon.
     
    mr. chip, Mar 7, 2004
    #10
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.