Usage of fiberglasss print drying rack

Discussion in 'Darkroom Developing and Printing' started by Steven Woody, Mar 5, 2008.

  1. Steven Woody

    Steven Woody Guest

    for fiberglass print drying rack, should one put the prints on it with
    emusion side down or up? thanks.
     
    Steven Woody, Mar 5, 2008
    #1
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  2. Steven Woody

    ____ Guest

    Some people will say that depends on the paper type; fiber or RC.

    I use an RC dryer and before that a hair dryer. So I only use the
    screens for Fiber. I also know people that dry fiber face down. People I
    respect their work: However I have always used face up, I squeegee the
    prints and they are dry but morning, without water spots and screen
    marks which if you fail to remove enough water may appear on the paper.
     
    ____, Mar 5, 2008
    #2
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  3. Steven Woody

    Steven Woody Guest

    ok, thanks for the information.
     
    Steven Woody, Mar 5, 2008
    #3
  4. I have always dried fiber face-down on screens. I agree that if you
    squeegee or chamois all the water off first, it doesn't really matter
    which side up you do it.

    When I was in school we often had to produce large numbers of good
    quality prints very fast. At peak periods we would prevail upon the
    other students mixing the fixer in the large group darkrooms to omit
    the hardener so we could cut wash times a bit if we were toning. It
    wasn't uncommon in this environment to see prints damaged in most ways
    you can imagine, for example by being slid into the rack of drying
    screens face-down too vigorously, resulting in scuffing of the emulsion
    surface, or by being squeegeed with a squeegee with some grit or crud
    on it, resulting in discrete surface scratches.

    Either way you can screw up but I've always found it easier to work with
    less stuff to keep clean, so I do it the way I don't have to squeegee
    the emulsion side of the paper -- no squeegee to wipe down for dirt
    first. If I dry face-up without squeegeeing I get water spots that do
    not always come out easily when I flatten the paper in my dry mount
    press, so face-down it is.
     
    Thor Lancelot Simon, Mar 5, 2008
    #4
  5. The traditional way is to dry fiber prints emulsion side down.
    There is a rational to this. The idea is that curling of prints is
    mostly due to the emulsion shrinking more than the support. This
    shrinking is minimized by slowing down the drying. That happens when
    the emulsion is against the screen which limits the contact with the
    air. Old style screens used cheesecloth which held some water making
    the emulsion side dry even more slowly.
    Since the support side of RC paper is dimensionally stable this
    drying scheme is not needed although screens may still be convenient
    for drying. RC is usually dried emulsion side up.
    The differential drying gotten with a screen is also the reason
    blotter books and rolls have a non-permeable sheet, waxed paper in the
    very old ones, interleaved with the blotters. The idea is to put the
    emulsion against the sheet so that the drying takes place mostly from
    the support side minimizing curling.

    Richard Knoppow
    Los Angeles, CA, USA
     
    Richard Knoppow, Mar 5, 2008
    #5
  6. Steven Woody

    Steven Woody Guest

    Thanks for the information. It's good!
     
    Steven Woody, Mar 6, 2008
    #6
  7. Steven Woody

    dan.c.quinn Guest

    Wondered about those "non-permeable" sheets. My blotter
    book was set aside years ago in favor of a corrugated board
    stack dryer. Although the prints do come out of the dryer with
    nothing more than a hint of emulsion side curl they do over
    time, unweighted, develop some more emulsion side curl.

    As it is the stack is built by alternating layers of board,
    hydrophobic sheets, and prints; a same sheeting each
    side of the prints. Perhaps I should be using a less
    permeable sheet emulsion side for long term
    flatter prints. Dan
     
    dan.c.quinn, Mar 9, 2008
    #7
  8. Wondered about those "non-permeable" sheets. My blotter
    book was set aside years ago in favor of a corrugated board
    stack dryer. Although the prints do come out of the dryer
    with
    nothing more than a hint of emulsion side curl they do over
    time, unweighted, develop some more emulsion side curl.

    As it is the stack is built by alternating layers of board,
    hydrophobic sheets, and prints; a same sheeting each
    side of the prints. Perhaps I should be using a less
    permeable sheet emulsion side for long term
    flatter prints. Dan

    Worth a try. The idea of these things, especially the
    blotter rolls, is that there is some air circulation at the
    back side of the blotters allowing faster drying. Kodak used
    to make a print dryer using corrugated blotter rolls with a
    blower.
    The same principle works for flattening prints using a
    dry mounting press. The print is put in the press with
    either several sheets of pre-dryed "kraft" paper on the
    support side or a sheet of blotter paper, also pre-dryed in
    the press there. The emulsion side is covered by release
    tissue. The print is put into the press and heated for a
    minute or two and then the entire sandwich of release
    tissue, print, and backup paper, is placed under a flat
    weight to cool. I've found this method to be very effective
    for fiber based prints and, once flattened this way, the
    prints seem to stay flat regardless of temperature or
    humidity.
    It does not work for RC of course, because the base does
    not absorb or loose water. BTW, RC prints seem to curl right
    up when the RH get really low, as it does here sometimes.
     
    Richard Knoppow, Mar 10, 2008
    #8
  9. Hi all,

    Richard, Thank you for a very lucid explanation of how paper dries?

    I've used screens, face up. From my neighbour who is closing his
    darkroom because he is returning to Switzerland, I recently received 6
    rolls of Kodak Blotting Paper, 11.5" x6'.

    I'll try the blotting paper route, but I would like to know if there are
    pros and cons to each method. And why?

    Thanks!

    Cheers,
    Bogdan

    --
    ________________________________________________________________
    Bogdan Karasek
    Montréal, Québec
    Canada www.bogdanphoto.com

    "I bear witness"
    ________________________________________________________________
     
    Bogdan Karasek, Mar 10, 2008
    #9
  10. Steven Woody

    dan.c.quinn Guest

    Kodak's blotter rolls used a single face corrugated
    board with a length of blotter paper forming the second
    face. I used and liked mine. Prints came out flat but
    with the characteristic bend towards the emulsion.
    Salthill, Burke & James and others offered corrugated
    board stack dryers using BLOTTER PAPER. I've updated
    the old corrugated board stack dryer by using a special
    ventilator grade corrugated board in conjunction with
    non-woven synthetic fiber separators.
    The result is a print dryer which is Very inexpensive,
    Compact, Ultra light weight, and easily stowable. It
    leaves prints dry and Flat. Dan
     
    dan.c.quinn, Mar 12, 2008
    #10
  11. Kodak's blotter rolls used a single face corrugated
    board with a length of blotter paper forming the second
    face. I used and liked mine. Prints came out flat but
    with the characteristic bend towards the emulsion.
    Salthill, Burke & James and others offered corrugated
    board stack dryers using BLOTTER PAPER. I've updated
    the old corrugated board stack dryer by using a special
    ventilator grade corrugated board in conjunction with
    non-woven synthetic fiber separators.
    The result is a print dryer which is Very inexpensive,
    Compact, Ultra light weight, and easily stowable. It
    leaves prints dry and Flat. Dan

    That sounds like a good idea. Now that you remind me I
    do remember very large dryers using blotter stacks, was this
    a Kodak machine?
     
    Richard Knoppow, Mar 12, 2008
    #11
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